It Got Serious In A Hurry, by Robert Gore

He’s a joke, but nobody’s laughing.

Trump’s five years were fun. He said things that provoked outrage among all the right people, often because they were true. You could laugh at their hypocritical idiocies, hysterical posturing, and sputtering anger. To paraphrase Oscar Wilde, anyone who can watch Keith Olbermann or Rachel Maddow without laughing has a heart of stone. Frothing anger fueled effort after effort to depose Trump until success was realized with overblown pandemic panic, riots, and a clearly rigged election. If nothing else, Trump exposed the mendacity, arrogance, incompetence, venality, and criminality of the Corruptocracy.

Reality doesn’t invert. A corollary is that the severity of consequences from an inversion is the square of the distance between the inversion and reality. Consider the US military. It has disregarded the realities of the wars it has fought—the relative difficulty of invasion versus defense, the deadly effectiveness of guerrilla warfare and insurgency, the corruption, tyranny, and lack of domestic support for our puppets, and so on—losing every conflict since WWII, often after lengthy and in some cases ongoing engagements.

The current crop of corruptocrats have introduced yet another inversion in the military, the woke inversion. The military will now be graded on its commitment to combat-irrelevant factors: the racial, ethnic, gender, sexual preferences and political creeds of its forces, and their professed fealty to regnant political dogma. In other words, “diversity” in everything but thought.

This inversion is huge and given the distance squared corollary, it will soon render the armed forces incapable of fighting even a war for the protection of the United States proper. Given its ineptitude fighting offensive wars, the military will be completely useless. The defense budget, however, will grow ever more bloated.

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Joe Biden aspired to mediocrity in his prime and it’s been downhill ever since. As for Kamala Harris: some are born hacks, some achieve hackness, and some have hackness thrust upon them. She’s all three. They and their string-pullers have taken things from fun to serious—deadly serious—in a little over two months.

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No posting Sunday, May 16

I will not be posting today, May 16, and will resume posting tomorrow, May 17.

Lawn Sign of the Year

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A Primer for the Propagandized: Fear Is the Mind-Killer, by Margaret Anna Alice

No land or people is exempt from totalitarianism, it can happen anywhere. From Margaret Anna Alice at off-guardian.org:

Totalitarianism, if not fought against, could triumph anywhere.”
George Orwell

The noose is dangling gently around our necks. Every day, they cinch it tighter. By the time we realize it’s strangling us, it will be too late.

Those who – gradually and gleefully – sacrifice their freedoms, their autonomy, their individuality, their livelihoods, and their relationships on the altar of the “common good” have forgotten this is the pattern followed by every totalitarian regime in history.

Everyone wonders how ordinary Germans could have been manipulated to participate or stand dumbstruck while their government was transformed into a genocidal juggernaut. This is how. Read Sebastian Haffner’s Defying Hitler memoir to see how this can happen anywhere—including here.

Everyone wonders how Russians could have permitted and even zealously reported fellow citizens for imprisonment and execution under Article 58, the penal code invented to incarcerate anyone who dared express the slightest whisper of noncompliance under Stalin’s homicidal state. This is how. Read Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s meticulously documented The Gulag Archipelago to witness this progression of authoritarian lunacy.

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If I Had Made the Closing Argument in Defense of Derek Chauvin…, by Robert S. Griffin

Monday morning quarterbacks are not always wrong, and Derek Chauvin may not have gotten a very good closing argument from his attorney. From Robert S. Griffin at unz.com:

At this writing, in mid-May, 2021, former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin has been convicted by a jury of second-degree murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd during Floyd’s arrest. Chauvin hasn’t been sentenced yet. The first charge carries a maximum of forty years in prison.

Chauvin was one of four officers involved in the arrest of Floyd on May 25th 2020 for passing a counterfeit $20 bill. They handcuffed him but were unable to get him to go into the back seat of a police car. While Floyd was lying face down in the street, Chauvin had his knee on Floyd’s neck and shin on his back for over nine minutes and he died. Mobile phone video taken by a bystander recorded the episode. The autopsy revealed that Floyd had COVID, heart disease, and high amounts of fentanyl and methamphetamine in his system at the time of his death. The medical examiner’s opinion was that Floyd died of cardiac arrest and that his health condition contributed to his death, which he ruled a homicide. The case received extensive attention because of its racial angle: Chauvin is White, Floyd was Black. It fit the current widely-believed narrative of an epidemic of racism-motivated killings of blameless Blacks by White cops.

I didn’t follow the Chauvin case all that closely. I sampled front-page news accounts in the paper and read daily summaries of the trial on the internet. I watched the defense closing argument on television, which brought up questions for me and prompted this writing. Later, I read a transcript of it.[1]

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The Voyage Begins, by Ray Jason

Where we’re headed, from Ray Jason at theseagypsyphilosopher.blogspot.com:

This is a fictional exploration of the near future.

It was the Field of Gold incident that convinced me that it was time. That was when I sailed away … probably forever.

For years, many truth-tellers had warned that there was a gigantic, half-hidden Evil steadily suffocating Humanity. Many pointed out that when the Malignant Overlords proclaimed that “You will own nothing, and be happy” this also meant that THEY would own everything … and be ecstatic. I was one of those who were shouting such warnings from the World-Wide Watchtowers.

But I was different. I could escape. This was not an accident. I had mastered the art of living aboard a self-sufficient sailboat that could flee to any of our ocean planet’s uninhabited islands. There are thousands of them. For years, I had been charting hundreds of possible options. I achieved this by gleefully using satellite images from the very same technocrats who were trying to enslave me.

Since I was forsaking civilization and embracing solitude, the mandatory vaccine passports would not restrain me. That’s because the islands I chose, were not defiled by “officials.” And since I use “the old ways” to navigate, I cannot be tracked. My sextant is not connected to their global control network.

Plus, I had never owned a smart phone or even spent a minute on social media. My path and past disappeared astern of me like the wake of my sturdy sailing boat. Hell, I am so far off the Gryd, that I’m not sure if I remember how to spell it.

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On the Hypocrites at Apple Who Fired Antonio Garcia-Martinez, by Matt Taibbi

One guy makes some statements that might arguably be construed as misogynistic, the other sings songs that leave no doubt about their misogyny. Which guy gets fired and which guy has a seat on the Apple board? From Matt Taibbi at taibbi.substack.com:

Much easier to ruin a career than mess with a corporate cash cow

I’m biased, because I know Antonio Garcia-Martinez and something like the same thing once happened to me, but the decision by Apple to bend to a posse of internal complainers and fire him over a passage in a five-year-old book is ridiculous hypocrisy. Hypocrisy by the complainers, and defamatory cowardice by the bosses — about right for the Invasion of the Body Snatchers-style era of timorous conformity and duncecap monoculture the woke mobs at these places are trying to build as their new Jerusalem.

Garcia-Martinez is a brilliant, funny, multi-talented Cuban-American whose confessional memoir Chaos Monkeys is to big tech what Michael Lewis’s Liar’s Poker was to finance. A onetime high-level Facebook executive — he ran Facebook Ads — Antonio’s book shows the House of Zuckerberg to be a cult full of on-the-spectrum zealots who talked like justice activists while possessing the business ethics of Vlad the Impaler:

Facebook is full of true believers who really, really, really are not doing it for the money, and really, really will not stop until every man, woman, and child on earth is staring into a blue-framed window with a Facebook logo.

When I read Chaos Monkeys the first time I was annoyed, because this was Antonio’s third career at least — he’d also worked at Goldman, Sachs — and he tossed off a memorable bestseller like it was nothing. Nearly all autobiographies fail because the genre requires total honesty, and not only do few writers have the stomach for turning the razor on themselves, most still have one eye on future job offers or circles of friends, and so keep the bulk of their interesting thoughts sidelined — you’re usually reading a résumé, not a book.

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The US Government Is On Track to Top Last Year’s Record-Breaking Deficits, by Ryan McMaken

The US government goes from new high to newer high in deficits. The chances it will ever repay its debt with dollars whose value is anything approaching the value of dollars today is infinitesimal. From Ryan McMaken at mises.org:

The Treasury department has issued its spending and revenue report for April 2021, and it’s clear the US government is headed toward another record-breaking year for deficits.

According to the report, the US federal government collected $439.2 billion in revenue during April 2021, which was a sizable improvement over April 2020 and over March 2021. Indeed, April 2021’s revenue total was the largest since July of last year when the federal government collected 563.5 billion following several months of delays on tax filing deadlines beyond the usual April 15 deadline. (Not surprisingly, in most years, April tends to be the federal government’s biggest month for tax collections.)

In spite of April’s haul, however, the federal government managed to spend much more than that, with spending topping $664 billion during April. This means the federal government ran a sizable deficit in April of 225.6 billion. This was a middling sum compared to other monthly deficits this fiscal year (which began on October 1), but deficits are adding up fast.

For the first seven months of this fiscal year combined, the US government collected $2.1 trillion in revenue, yet it spend nearly twice as much: $4.1 trillion, or 90 percent more than it collected.

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Biden’s State-Sponsored Labor Shortage, by Greg Orman

Businesses are crying for workers and the government is paying people not to work. From Greg Orman at realclearpolitics.com:

Biden's State-Sponsored Labor Shortage

Huh)

President Biden spoke at the White House earlier this week to address an unsettling national trend – millions of jobs going unfilled in an economy still struggling to right itself. The president couldn’t deny the existence of the paradox: His own administration’s numbers show that millions of Americans are drawing unemployment while millions of jobs are going unfilled. But he and his top economic officials dismissed the most obvious explanation for April’s dismal job numbers – generous unemployment benefits eroding the incentive to work. “We don’t see much evidence of that,” Biden said.

It was a line dutifully echoed by his designee to run the Commerce Department, the Cabinet department tasked with compiling employment numbers. But it’s a disingenuous argument. The Commerce Department, through the Bureau of Labor Statistics, derives employment numbers by compiling two surveys of employment – one completed by roughly 144,000 employers and another completed by approximately 54,000 American citizens. Neither of these surveys actually ask if an employee has been offered a job and turned it down. And it’s awfully hard to find evidence of something when you’re not actually looking for it.

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A Society Based on the Social Credit System is Closer Than You Think, by Robert Wheeler

There are a gaggle of US politicians who are looking at China’s Social Credit System with lust in their hearts. From Robert Wheeler at theorganicprepper.com:

The social credit system took yet another step forward—this time, from Down Under. Under the guise of a welfare crackdown, Australia moved 25,000 people onto a cashless card system that restricts non-essential purchases. 

Aussie welfare recipients only access to funds is via a cashless debit card

Australia’s government forced thousands of welfare recipients on to Centrelink, a cashless debit card. Under a massive expansion of the plan and new Federal Budget, immigrants have no access to most kinds of welfare for four years after attaining residency. However, the most crucial aspect of Centrelink is Aussies cannot use the cards for gambling, alcohol, or cigarettes. Only necessities like groceries and food can be purchased with the cards. 

East Kimberley and Goldfields in Western Australia, Ceduna in South Australia, and the Bundaberg-Hervey Bay region of Queensland trialed the cards beginning in 2016. Under this scheme, 80 percent of welfare recipients’ Centrelink payment will go directly to the card rather than a bank account. That is supposed to keep recipients from wasting the welfare on unnecessary items.

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg unveiled the plan to make the scheme permanent in the trial locations. The plan also includes extending it to 25,000 people in the Northern Territory and Cape York.

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Biden’s Green “No” Deal Exposes Virtue-Signaling Americans’ NIMBY Views On Wind Power, by Tyler Durden

Lots of people are all for wind power, but not in their backyard. From Tyler Durden at zerohedge.com:

The Biden administration’s infrastructure proposal layouts 100% carbon-free or clean electricity by 2035. Such an ambitious goal will require a massive new workforce, hundreds of billions of dollars in funding, and community support.

But all is not kosher as wind turbine projects across the country have hit turbulence among local officials and residents.

President Biden’s proposed Energy Efficiency and Clean Electricity Standard calls for tens of thousands of wind turbines. These massive windmill-looking machines destroy any beautiful landscape and are noisy.

WSJ explains since 2015, about 300 government entities across the US have rejected wind farm projects. In Scituate, Massachusetts, people complained to local officials that a wind turbine in the coastal town was noisy and prevented them from sleeping. Officials restricted the operation of the wind turbine to only daytime use.

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