Category Archives: Uncategorized

Joe Biden’s ‘conspiracy theory’ memo to U.S. media doesn’t match the facts, by John Solomon

It’s a wonder that anyone thinks this man is fit to be president. From John Solomon at johnsolomonreports.com:

Former vice president Joe Biden’s extraordinary campaign memo this week imploring U.S. news media to reject the allegations surrounding his son Hunter’s work for a Ukrainian natural gas company makes several bold declarations.

The memo by Biden campaign aides Kate Bedingfield and Tony Blinkenspecifically warned reporters covering the impeachment trial they would be acting as “enablers of misinformation” if they repeated allegations that the former vice president forced the firing of Ukraine’s top prosecutor, who was investigating Burisma Holdings, where Hunter Biden worked as a highly compensated board member.

Biden’s memo argues there is no evidence that the former vice president’s or Hunter Biden’s conduct raised any concern, and that Prosecutor General Viktor Shokin’s investigation was “dormant” when the vice president forced the prosecutor to be fired in Ukraine.

The memo calls the allegation a “conspiracy theory”  (and, in full disclosure, blames my reporting for the allegations surfacing last year.)

But the memo omits critical impeachment testimony and other evidence that paint a far different portrait than Biden’s there’s-nothing-to-talk-about-here rebuttal.

Here are the facts, with links to public evidence, so you can decide for yourself.

Continue reading

The Unexpected Consequences Of Germany’s Anti-Nuclear Push, by Irina Slav

How about that, there are no free lunches in energy production. From Irina Slav at oilprice.com:

Nuclear plant Germany

Germany, the poster child for renewable energy, sourcing close to half of its electricity from renewable sources, plans to close all of its nuclear power plants by 2022. Its coal-fired plants, meanwhile, will be operating until 2038. According to a study from the U.S. non-profit National Bureau of Economic Research, Germany is paying dearly for this nuclear phase-out–with human lives.

The study looked at electricity generation data between 2011 and 2017 to assess the costs and benefits of the nuclear phase-out, which was triggered by the Fukushima disaster in 2011 and which to this day enjoys the support of all parliamentary powers in Europe’s largest economy. It just so happens that some costs may be higher than anticipated.

The shutting down of nuclear plants naturally requires the replacement of this capacity with something else. Despite its reputation as a leader in solar and wind, Germany has had to resort to more natural gas-powered generation and, quite importantly, more coal generation. As of mid-2019, coal accounted for almost 30 percent of Germany’s energy mix, with nuclear at 13.1 percent and gas at 9.3 percent.

Continue reading

Who Can Complain? By Bionic Mosquito

Shut up and enjoy the panopticon and your guaranteed income. From Bionic Mosquito at lewrockwell.com:

In seventy-five jaw-dropping graphs, Pinker shows that life, health, prosperity, safety, peace, knowledge, and happiness are on the rise….

Such is the Amazon blurb on Steven Pinker’s Enlightenment Now.  You think I would disagree; let’s see.

Who can complain about a longer and healthier life, safety and peace, more food and shelter than almost any of your contemporaries and certainly more than those who came before you?

Photo source

Yes, who can complain?  Peace and material comfort beyond compare.  Better health care too.

Of course, one must subtract the violence inflicted on you by your keeper, and life couldn’t be better.  Unless, of course, you are after meaning in life.  And liberty.

Is this lion happy?  Enjoying a meaningful life?

John Vervaeke made an interesting comment about Pinker’s work (I think during this conversation, but I am not sure).  Something along the lines: the most ironic thing about Pinker’s book is the fact that he had to write it.  If life was really so wonderful, why would we need to be convinced?

Conclusion

Wouldn’t the lion consider this his gulag?

No Posting 1/14/20-1/17/20

I’ll be traveling from Tuesday, 1/14/20 through Friday, 1/17/20, so there will be no posting on those days. Posting will resume Saturday, 1/18/20.

Avoid Vipers’ Nests, by William Gudal

The US goes around poking vipers’ nests, then complains when the vipers strike. From SLL reader William Gudal:

The United States has been poking, prodding and punching Iran ever since 1953 when Kermit Roosevelt, the CIA and Britain overthrew the government of Iran and installed and then financed and supported one of the most brutally repressive, police state, jackbooted governments ever. If the people of Iran were a little upset in 1979, well you can only wonder.

The United States, implementing its guiding policy of “exceptionalism” inaugurated its quest for empire in 1898 when it acquired and colonized Cuba (puppet government), Guam, Puerto Rico and the Philippines (million dead). Since then there has existed almost no restraint on the U.S. thirst for power and control. The list is almost endless.  The central guiding foreign policy objective of the United States is to install U.S. controlled puppet governments whenever and wherever it can. When it meets resistance, it gets angry, to wit: Iraq, Libya, Panama, Afghanistan.

The U.S. has had its beady eye on Iran for over 70 years. Britain began ogling Iran early in the twentieth century, for geopolitical, economic (world’s 2nd largest non-sand oil reserves) and geographic reasons. The U.S. adamantly seeks to deny Iran its naturally significant role in its sphere of the world. Like the United States, Iran has what the U.S. calls its “significant interests”. Apparently the U.S. is entitled to its significant interests and “security” concerns, but others are not. It’s a one way street.

Iran is a large country with a large population. It has an ancient history. Ever hear of the Persian Empire which stretched from Greece to Egypt to India? It has a well-educated citizenry. Its economy has been squeezed dry by U.S. economic sanctions which until recently would have been equated with a declaration of war.

A military officer vising a neighboring country is mutilated by a drone from a country located 5000 miles away. Who granted the approval to take this life? Who has the right to take this life? This can only be described as insanity. The world has truly lost its mind. The best U.S. policy would be to let Iran alone. But the military industrial complex must be thrown its red meat. The U.S. economy is almost entirely dependent on war or preparation for war, at least at the  critical margin. Moreover, it’s time to rally around the leader in time of the November election. We worry about the Middle East yet the U.S. southern border is wide open to any evil which comes this way. Madness.

Pompeo: I Lied About Soleimani ‘Imminent Attacks’, by Daniel McAdams

Mike Pompeo seems genuinely proud of his lies. From Daniel McAdams at ronpaulinstitute.org:

Trump’s neoconservative Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo, is a man unafraid to admit to being a liar. In fact he seems to revel in his ability to lie to the American people.

Remember just a week ago when Pompeo told us that the US absolutely HAD to send in a drone to assassinate Iran’s top general, Qassim Soleimani, while he was in Iraq on a peace mission because he was planning “imminent attacks” on US personnel and interests in the Middle East.

These claims were crafted to blunt any criticism of the blatantly illegal act of killing a top military officer of a country with which you are not at war in a third country (which forbade the attack on its soil) with which you are allied. Americans raising concerns about the murder of Soleimani were to be made to look unpatriotic if they objected: “you mean you WANT Americans die?

Continue reading

The Kerfuffle War – Trump’s Iran De-escalation Succeeds, by Joaquin Flores

This article has one of the better What’s Going On With Iran hypotheses because it looks a multiplicity of factors instead of one or two, and the hypothesis is consistent with those factors. From Joaquin Flores at strategic-culture.org:

Just like that, it was over. General Mark Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff called it ‘a kerfuffle’. A letter was sent to their Iraqi peers that the U.S was repositioning troops out of Iraq in accordance with legislation from Iraq ending the U.S military presence in the war-torn country, and suddenly then it was retracted by higher-ups. Running interference, Mark Esper backed Milley and said it was ‘an honest mistake’. It all went down within a day of the irrational assassination of Iran’s Soleimani.

The immediate termination of Chewning and Sweeney, at the same time as the assassination of Soleimani and Iran’s response raises some big questions. In the near future it will be of critical importance to get to the bottom of any possible relationship that Esper and his subordinates Chewning and Sweeney – who both served as Defense Secretary Esper’s Chiefs of Staff – had to the assassination of Soleimani. The assassination and any number of possible Iranian responses, can push the U.S into a broad and open military conflict with Iran. Such a war would also be Trump’s undoing.

Continue reading