How the British Invented Globalism, by Richard Poe

During good times and bad, for better or worse, many British intellectuals have stayed married to the idea of Anglo-American run globalism. From Richard Poe at lewrockwell.com:

MOST PATRIOTS agree that we’re fighting something called “globalism.”

But what is it?

First and foremost, it is a British invention.

Modern globalism was born in Victorian England, and later promoted by Britain’s Fabian socialists.

It is now the dominant belief system of today’s world.

George Orwell called it Ingsoc.

In his novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, Orwell foretold a future in which the British Empire merges with the United States to form Oceania, a superstate driven by an evil ideology called Ingsoc (an abbreviation for English Socialism).

Orwell’s dystopia was based on his knowledge of actual globalist plans.

“Federation of the World”

As British power expanded in the 19th century, global dominion seemed inevitable.

Imperial administrators laid plans for a world united under British rule.

The key to making it work was to join forces with the United States, just as Orwell described in his novel.

Many Anglophiles in the U.S. were more than eager to go along with this plan.

“We are a part, and a great part, of the Greater Britain which seems so plainly destined to dominate this planet…” enthused The New York Times in 1897, during the festivities for Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee.

In 1842, Alfred Tennyson — soon to become Queen Victoria’s official poet laureate — wrote the poem “Locksley Hall.” It envisioned a golden age of peace, under “universal law,” a “Parliament of man” and a “Federation of the world.”

Tennyson’s words foreshadowed the League of Nations and the UN. But Tennyson did not invent these concepts. He merely celebrated plans already underway among British elites.

Generations of British globalists have cherished Tennyson’s poem as if it were Holy Writ. Winston Churchill praised it in 1931 as “the most wonderful of all modern prophecies.” He called the League of Nations a fulfillment of Tennyson’s vision.

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One response to “How the British Invented Globalism, by Richard Poe

  1. Carroll Quigley, author of Tragedy and Hope(1966) and The Anglo-American Establishment(1981) would have been proud of this “globalism”

    Like

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