OTC COVID Rxs, Azelastin to Zinc, by John Day, MD

This is a public service for those who think there has to be better ways of either protecting themselves from Covid or treating themselves if they do get it. From John Day, MD at theautomaticearth.com:

The Automatic Earth’s resident doctor, John Day MD, who’s about to lose his job for refusing to be vaccinated, has compiled a list of OTC prophylactics and treatments for Covid, and specified dosages.

John Day MD: I have gotten a lot of questions from people during the Delta-COVID peak this summer about OTC supplements and repurposed medicines to self-treat COVID, other than staying home alone and awaiting the inevitable, as is routinely advised. All of this advice applies to pregnant women. That is a group with a lot of questions. I am deeply disturbed at how expectant-mothers are being treated by the medical machine these days.

Firstly, don’t use ibuprofen or Aleve. Do not use NSAIDs when sick with COVID-19. I saw information from China in February 2020, and again from France in April 2020 that NSAIDs like these worsened hospital patient outcomes. I don’t know how confirmed that is, nor do I want to await further word. It is easy to avoid them, and they interfere with the anticoagulant effects of aspirin, anyway, which matters, as will be explained.

Support the normal functioning of your immune system with Vitamin-D. Every B-cell and T-cell in your immune system has vitamin-D receptors on it and won’t work properly and intelligently if a lot of them are empty. For most people, in the long term, 5000 units per day of vitamin D-3 (the kind you can buy) is a good dose, and will get people into the normal range. Exceptions to that are people who absorb it poorly and metabolize it poorly. Those people are the ones who still have a low level after months of taking 5000 units per day. You have to do the test to know you need more. People with a lot of body fat distribute their dose into a larger fat volume, and often need more.

A person who has a body weight over 100 kg (220 lb.) might do better to take 10,000 units per day. Checking a blood test after at least 3 months would help confirm what is best. Taking 10,000 units per day for the first month or 2, in order to normalize blood level is good. What is the ideal one time dose of vitamin-D to normalize one’s blood level, assuming a low starting point? A lot of effort has gone into answering that question, and it can be found here:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC4128480/#R34

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