Category Archives: Government

Why Big Pharma Is Desperate to Get COVID Jab Into Babies, by Dr. Joseph Mercola

It’s probably not so the babies will be customers for life, because it’s somewhat problematic how long children jabbed from birth will live. But big pharma has its reasons. From Dr. Joseph Mercola at theburningplatform.com:

Story at-a-glance

  • The rate of COVID-19 associated hospitalization among children aged 5 to 11 is just 0.0008%. In real-world terms, that’s so close to zero you basically cannot lower it any further
  • Despite that, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s vaccine advisory panel — the Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC) — on June 15, 2022, unanimously approved to grant Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) to Pfizer’s and Moderna’s COVID shots for infants and young children
  • Pfizer’s EUA is for a three-dose regimen (3-microgram shots) for children 6 months to 5 years old; Moderna’s EUA is for a two-dose regimen (25-microgram shots) for children 6 months to 6 years
  • In granting this EUA, the FDA again ignored injury and death data and swept medical ethics aside

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Just Paddling While The Empire Burns, by Jim Quinn

In Nero’s Rome, in present-day America, in any system headed towards collapse, there’s always a remnant who sees what’s happening and understands the consequences. Because there’s little we can do about it except criticize and adjust our own personal circumstances the best we know how, we may lose sight of the fact that we’re not the only members of the remnant. It’s possible to find others. From Jim Quinn at theburningplatform.com:

The phrase “fiddling while Rome burns” is an intriguing idiom, referencing the great fire which ravaged Rome for six days in 64 A.D. and the legend that Nero, one of the most sadistic, decadent, and cruel rulers of all-time, instead of taking action to stop the fire, played his lyre while composing a song about Rome’s destruction. The Roman historian Tacitus wrote that Nero was rumored to have sung about the destruction of Rome while watching the city burn but it’s likely this was just a myth.

The fire destroyed seventy percent of the city and left half the population homeless. There are those who believe Nero set the fire on purpose, especially after he used land cleared by the fire to build his Golden Palace and its surrounding pleasure gardens. Being a soulless autocrat at heart, Nero did what all feckless politicians do, he blamed the Christians (an obscure religious sect at the time) for the fire and had many arrested and executed.

Bill Kristol on Twitter: "1952 years ago: Nero fiddled while Rome burned. Today: GOP bigs fiddle while the Republican Party burns. https://t.co/gnFUu1MoaJ" / Twitter

Whether this story is true or just a parable, the messages are pertinent throughout history, and never more so than now. Occupying one’s time doing inconsequential things while a catastrophic event is underway is the ultimate in leadership failure. Focusing on trivial matters while your people are suffering during a time of crisis is the mark of an ineffectual irresponsible leader or one whose true purpose is to burn down society so it can be “built back better” in the form of a communist totalitarian state ruled by a globalist elite cabal.

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The Time of Our Time, by James Howard Kunstler

Something is going to give, sooner rather than later. From James Howard Kunstler at kunstler.com:

We have not been so ripe for regime change since 1776. A ruling Party of Chaos is doing absolutely everything to disorder our lives and there really is no generous interpretation for its motives

Let’s face it: most people will not read Justice Alito’s carefully crafted arguments about what the constitution says or doesn’t say about abortion, or the meaning of “ordered liberty” through our history. We do not live in history. We live in the time of our time. And, until just recently, this has been a time that discarded former modes of conduct between men, women, and children as inconvenient to the presumably greater project of self-actualization.

To be-all-that-you-can-be is a stirring notion, and it seemed to work nicely within the colossal techno-industrial armature of the past century, with all its inducements to thrive personally, at least for the comfortable elites who pulled the levers of that system — though not so much for those below caught in the gears, who produced children despite all the novel means for avoiding it. For the fortunate, motherhood became just another “no” box to check off, while fatherhood merged into the odious mists of obsolete patriarchy. History is made up of things that seem like good ideas at the time. The hard part now is moving out of a familiar time into the undiscovered country of a new time.

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America Is More Fragile Than the Left Understands, by Victor Davis Hanson

Ayn Rand said the U.S. was more fragile than it looked . . . back in 1957. She also had a pretty good idea of why that was so. Writers and commentators have recycled her arguments for years, usually without attribution and usually without delving into deeper causes. Victor Davis Hanson does the same, but this article won’t take you as long to read as Atlas Shrugged. At least he cited Adam Smith. From Hanson at amgreatness.com:

Like a stunned adolescent whose reckless incompetence totaled the family car, the Left seems shocked that America proved so fragile after all.

“There is a great deal of ruin in a nation.”
— Adam Smith

The Left has been tempting fate since January 2021—applying its nihilist medicine to America on the premise that such a rich patient can ride out any toxic shock.

Our elites assume that all our nation’s past violent protests, all its would-be revolutions, all its cultural upheavals, all its institutionalized lawlessness were predicated on one central truth—America’s central core is so strong, so rich, and so resilient that it can withstand almost any assault. 

So, we can afford 120 days in 2020 of mass rioting, $2 billion in damage, some 35 killed, and 1,500 police injured. 

We can easily survive an Afghanistan, and our utter and complete military humiliation. There was no problem in abandoning some $70-80 billion in military loot to terrorists. Who cares that we tossed off a billion-dollar new embassy, and jettisoned a $300-million refitted air base, as long as our pride flags were waving in Kabul?

Certainly, we can afford to restructure all our universities, eliminate free expression and speech, and institute Maoist cultural revolutionary fervor in our revered institutions of higher learning—once the world’s greatest levers of scientific advancement and technological progress. 

We can jettison merit in every endeavor, from banning the world’s great books to grading math tests to running chemistry experiments. And still, a resilient America won’t notice.

We assumed that our foundational documents—the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution—our natural bounty in North America, our cherished rule of law, our legal immigration traditions that drew in the most audacious and hardworking on the planet, and our guarantees of personal freedom and liberty led to such staggering wealth and affluence that nothing much that this mediocre generation could do would ever endanger our resilience.

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Doctor says Pfizer’s COVID shot trial should be ‘null and void’ after ‘twisting’ data, by David McLoone

Hard is this is too believe, a major pharmaceutical company may have lied to us. From David McLoone at lifesitenews.com:


Pathologist Dr. Clare Craig found that Pfizer’s trial data for COVID jabs in 6-month old babies was ‘ignored’ and ‘twisted’ to satisfy FDA regulations.

Featured Image
Dr. Clare CraigChiefNerd/Rumble Screenshot

A British pathologist and researcher has said that Pfizer’s clinical trial for its COVID jabs in babies as young as six months old contains so many egregious flaws and misrepresentations that “the trial should be deemed null and void.”

Diagnostic pathologist and co-chair of the Health Advisory and Recovery Team (HART) group, Dr. Clare Craig recorded a six-minute video analyzing the data from Pfizer’s COVID jab trial in children aged between six months and four years old.

Collating information from Pfizer’s June 15 Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) application with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use of the drug in young children, Craig discovered that the vaccinated cohort contracted the virus in greater numbers than the placebo group, but that the pharmaceutical giant misreported the data to instead show that the “vaccine” was marginally more effective at preventing infection than foregoing the shot.

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On Losing “Roe”, by Dr. Naomi Wolf

The pro-abortion crowd kept pushing its limits beyond what millions of Americans would support. From Dr. Naomi Wolf at naomiwolf.substack.com:

How Could this Possibly have Happened? Easy. Pro-Choice Movement, Look in the Mirror

Last Friday, in a 6-3 ruling, the Supreme Court struck down the ruling Roe v Wade via its decision on Dobbs v Jackson Women’s Health Organization. Across the country, understandably, frightened and angry young women are protesting; screaming and weeping.

The organized, institutional, heavily funded US feminist movement, which for fifty years has predicated American feminist ideology, and its own donor appeals, on the foundation of defending Roe, is calling this ruling a travesty.

I am going to argue that the defeat of Roe is not in fact a defeat of women but a necessary evolution in the law, in response to women’s ascendancy in America over the last fifty years.

Before I do, though, I warn that the Roe decision is being used as a pretext for a campaign to delegitimize the Supreme Court. This anti-SCOTUS campaign fits in as part of the larger war on our democratic institutions, about which I have been writing in The Bodies of Others, and elsewhere.

Members of the Court are being abused, intimidated and threatened in ways that are the definition of “un-American.”

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A Victory for Life and Liberty, by Ron Paul

Abortion should, as a matter of constitutional law, be left to the states. From Ron Paul at ronpaulinstitute.org:

The Supreme Court undid one of its worst mistakes last week when it overturned Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision declaring a constitutional right to abortion. The Constitution reserves to the states the authority to write and enforce laws regarding murder. Since the question of whether or not to legalize abortion revolves around whether abortion is murder, it is not a federal issue. Roe was thus an illegitimate usurpation of state authority.

The Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization decision last week will not stop the federal government from using the tax dollars of those who believe abortion is murder to fund abortion and family planning both in the United States and abroad. Those opposed to abortion, and in favor of constitutional government, must continue their efforts to end all federal funding of abortion.

Some state governments, such as in Texas and Mississippi, have adopted laws against abortion that are “triggered” after Roe is overturned. Now, additional pro-life state legislators and activists are no doubt planning to push other states with pro-life majorities to pass legislation outlawing abortion.

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BlackRocking . . . by Eric Peters

As homeowners become involuntary renters, the homeowners who are left will end up subsidizing those rents. From Eric Peters at ericpetersautos.com:

 

Why are billion-dollar “capital” entities like BlackRock buying up hundreds of millions of dollars of formerly privately owned homes? It may be possible to divine the answer by looking at another number:

The millions of people on the cusp of being evicted from the places they rent.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, there are some 6.7 million of these people – who’ve had their rents increase by $250 per month, on average. The majority of these people earn less than $25,000 annually – and all of them have had the buying power of whatever they earn reduced by about 15 percent, via what is styled “inflation,” in order to make the victims of it think that the things they need to buy or pay for (like rent) cost more. In fact, their money just buys – and pays for – less.

Many of these renters have had their rent subsidized as part of what was styled “pandemic” relief,” an odd way of putting it since the “pandemic” didn’t force anyone to stop working (or hiring workers).

Rather, it was the government that did it.

The same government also told landlords they could not evict renters who weren’t paying rent. Which meant that landlords were being forced by the government to pay their rent – via the cost of paying the property taxes the government didn’t hold in abeyance, as well as all the associated carrying costs of owning a rental property – including the monthly mortgage payment.

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The Illinois Political Establishment’s Shameful Response To The Departure Of Ken Griffin And Citadel – Wirepoints, by Mark Glennon

In their arrogance, Illinois leaders are disparaging a business leader who’s leaving the state and taking his business with him. From Mark Glennon at wirepoints.org:

On a wall in Ken Griffin’s office at Citadel in Chicago, I’m told by people who worked there, hangs a thank you note from a six-year old. Like many kids that age, he was enthralled by prehistoric creatures so he wrote to thank Griffin for funding Evolving Planet, a permanent wing in Chicago’s Field Museum.

The six-year old was my son, who asked if he could write it after my wife had taken him for what must have been the fifth time to the exhibit.

I was proud that he had the simple decency to feel a need to thank somebody.

I wish I could say the same about the Illinois political establishment’s send-off to Griffin and Citadel, who are leaving for Florida. There was no decency in any of it.

Griffin is among the most successful financial entrepreneurs in history and Citadel was a crown jewel in Illinois’ economy. But the decency of a proper send-off was nowhere to be found in Illinois’ leadership. There wasn’t even the standard, “we’re disappointed to see them go,” which they usually say about corporate departures. Just a kick out the door for a golden goose.

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It Costs $22,648 And Requires 11 Agencies To Start A Restaurant In San Francisco, by Simon Black

Those costs are in addition to the regular costs of opening a restaurant. Anybody who has eaten a meal in a San Francisco restaurant has paid those costs; meals are exorbitant. From Simon Black at zerohedge.com:

In a report called Barriers to Business, the Institute for Justice (IJ) analyzed 20 US cities for how easy it is to open five different types of businesses. To cover a range, those businesses included a restaurant, a retail bookstore, a food truck, a barbershop, and a home-based tutoring business.

Entrepreneurs who want to start a restaurant, for example, have 13 different fees totaling $5,300, on average across the 20 cities. In San Francisco, those fees reach $22,648.

Remember, these costs and regulatory hurdles are all in addition to the normal costs and work of opening a restaurant.

The IJ also looked at the number of regulatory steps, and the number of government agencies it took to open a business. On average, across the 20 cities, it took 55 steps and eight government agencies just to open a barbershop.

And as if the cost and time burden wasn’t enough, the report found that in many of the cities, it was not even clear what all the requirements were to start a business.

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