In Florida, You Can’t Use Your Own Solar Panels in a Crisis, by Michael Krieger

There is something wrong when people who have solar panels can’t use them when regular power is down. From Michael Krieger at libertyblitzkrieg.com:

When it comes to the U.S. economy, the “con” part offers the best description of the current relationship between business, government and the preyed upon consumer. The way things work in early 21st century America is large businesses bribe politicians in a variety of ways at both the local and federal level, and the end result is laws that are designed to increase corporate profits at the expense of the wellbeing and freedom of the American public. Politicians end up with financial war chests to run their next campaign, while bureaucrats see a lucrative opportunity to swing through the ever spinning revolving door should they play ball with lobbyists and their patrons. Yes, there’s always some degree of corruption within any society of humans, but there are peaks and valleys in such cycles. I’d argue we are somewhere in the peak corruption phase.

Today’s article focuses on one of the most highly regulated industries in the country, electric utilities. It’s one of the most boring businesses in America. I know this because it fell under the umbrella of my responsibilities during my last Wall Street job, and I could barely read a utilities research report without immediately falling asleep. Nevertheless, as you’ll see in today’s piece, the industry still finds a way to generate large profits while simultaneously harming the people it’s supposed to service.

When I think about solar panels, it’s not just the use of a renewable resource I find appealing, but also the potential to take energy generation into your own hands; something that can prove quite useful in a major global crisis, or even something more minor like Hurricane Irma’s impact on Florida. The latter could’ve been a lifesaver for some Florida residents recently, but a local electric utility has done everything in its power to deny its customers such freedom.

To continue reading: In Florida, You Can’t Use Your Own Solar Panels in a Crisis

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2 responses to “In Florida, You Can’t Use Your Own Solar Panels in a Crisis, by Michael Krieger

  1. It is “The Sunshine State” after all. Thus I presume they own the rights to the Sun and it’s products. Lawyers think of everything!

    Like

  2. I am thinking of having my own solar panels. To be legally sure, I make sure that it is separate from any grid system and has nothing to do with the grid !

    Like

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