Nothing Exceeds Like Excess, by Jeff Thomas

There’s no way the US government gets a dollar’s worth of defense per dollar spent. From Jeff Thomas from internationalman.com:

Nothing Exceeds Like Excess

The first panacea for a mismanaged nation is inflation of the currency; the second is war. Both bring a temporary prosperity; both bring a permanent ruin. But both are the refuge of political and economic opportunists.

—Ernest Hemingway

Military spending is the second largest item in the US federal budget after Social Security. It has a habit of increasing significantly each year, and the proposed 2019 defense budget is $886 billion (roughly double what it was in 2003).

US military spending exceeds the total of the next ten largest countries combined. Although the US government acknowledges 682 military bases in 63 countries, that number may be over 1,000 (if all military installations are included), in 156 countries. Total military personnel is estimated at over 1.4 million.

The reader could be forgiven if he felt that a US military base was rather unnecessary in, say, Djibouti or the Bahamas, yet the US Congress will not allow the closure of any military bases. (The Bi-partisan Budget Act of 2013 blocked future military base closings under the argument that they’re all essential for “national security.”) And Congress has a vested interest in keeping all bases open and consuming as much in tax dollars as possible (more on that later).

Of course, those bases need to be kept well-stocked with small arms, tanks, missiles and aircraft. Yet, in spite of the admittedly incredible number of US military bases across the globe, the additional stockpile of weaponry is so great that the government has difficulty finding places to put it all.

One storage location is pictured in the photo above—Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson, Arizona. In spite of the size of the photo, it shows only a portion of the aircraft located there. (And bear in mind, such aircraft often cost over $100 million each.)

If asked, the military states that, although these aircraft are in dead storage and many have never seen any use whatever, they might possibly be called up for service, “if needed.” Of course, if they’re needed, they’re unlikely to be of use if located in Arizona. And, in addition, they may not be useful for warfare, as war technology has moved on since the days when such aircraft designs were suitable.

To continue reading: Nothing Exceeds Like Excess

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One response to “Nothing Exceeds Like Excess, by Jeff Thomas

  1. One question for the awesome expert. How does the writer equate the amount of wages paid to its military (non voluntary) and about double the size of the US if one includes its paramilitary formations, when we pay our troops about 100 times the wages the PRC pays?

    If the USA pays more than the next ten nations, how did the Chinese manage to tripe the size of their fleet in the past ten years while Obama reduced our fleet by 30%, despite spending more?

    I wonder why spending ten times for bio diesel as opposed to normal diesel has something to do with this. Perhaps its the use of the military for social justice experiments for the environment, diversity and transgenders all paid out of the military budget that have zero to do with defending the nation that wastes the defense dollar?

    Like

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