Black Political Power Means Zilch, by Walter E. Williams

The way upward mobility generally works in America is economic power and wealth come before political power. Many blacks think the opposite can work just as well, but it doesn’t. From Walter E. Williams at lewrockwell.com:

It’s often thought to be beyond question that black political power is necessary for economic power and enhanced socio-economic welfare. That’s an idea that lends itself to testing and analysis.

Between 1970 and 2012, the number of black elected officials rose from fewer than 1,500 to more than 10,000. Plus, a black man was elected to the presidency twice. Jason Riley, a fellow at the Manhattan Institute, tells how this surge in political power has had little beneficial impact on the black community.

In a PragerU video, “Blacks in Power Don’t Empower Blacks” (http://tinyurl.com/y84psoyt), Riley says the conventional wisdom was based on the notion that only black politicians could understand and address the challenges facing blacks. Therefore, electing more black city councilors, mayors, representatives and senators was deemed critical. Even some liberal social scientists now disagree. Gary Orfield says, “There may be little relationship between the success of … black leaders and the opportunities of typical black families.” Riley says that while many black politicians achieved considerable personal success, many of their constituents did not.

After the 2014 Ferguson, Missouri, riots, which followed the killing of Michael Brown after he charged a policeman, much was made of the small number of blacks on the city’s police force. Riley asks: If the racial composition of the police force is so important, how does one explain the Baltimore riots the following year after Freddie Gray died in police custody? Baltimore’s police force is 40 percent black. Its police commissioner is black. Its mayor is black, as is the majority of the City Council. What can be said of black political power in Baltimore can also be said of Cleveland, Detroit, Philadelphia, Washington, Atlanta and New Orleans. In these cities, blacks have been mayors, police chiefs, city councilors and superintendents of schools for decades.

To continue reading: Black Political Power Means Zilch

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2 responses to “Black Political Power Means Zilch, by Walter E. Williams

  1. I respect Mr. Williams as a voice of reason. But political power while it may not change the general position of blacks, has created a grievance industry, affirmative action, and allowed the black elites to line their pockets while most blacks have seen their social-economic situation collapse.

    It parallels what has happened in society at large.

    Like

  2. Pingback: Black Political Power Means Zilch, by Walter E. Williams | MemePosts

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