The Rise of Utilitarian Extremism, and How to Recognize It, by Joseph Mercola

Utilitarian extremism is a fancy way of saying if the people who decide such things decide that the greater good is served by screwing individuals, that’s okay. From Joseph Mercola at articles.mercola.com:

Story at-a-glance

  • Proof of vaccination requirements for travel are rare, and limited to travel to certain destinations where the risk of contracting a disease and bringing it back to a population with nonexistent immunity against it is high
  • The U.S. government’s job is to protect the Constitutional rights of all Americans. Allowing or encouraging businesses to create a two-tier society where unvaccinated people are barred from participating in civic society is unconstitutional
  • Proof of vaccination against COVID-19 will not ensure safety. It won’t even promote it, as the so-called vaccines are designed to merely reduce symptoms of the infection
  • Utilitarianism, which is now being increasingly promoted, is a discredited pseudo-ethic that has repeatedly been used to justify horrific human rights abuses. It is based on a mathematical equation that some individuals can be sacrificed for the greater good of the majority
  • Utilitarianism appears to be at work already. The European Union’s vaccine injury reporting system had logged 330,218 adverse event reports, including 7,766 deaths, as of April 17, 2021, and the U.S. reporting system had logged 118,902 adverse event reports as of April 23, including 3,544 deaths and 12,618 serious injuries, yet all of these injuries and deaths are simply ignored and people are told to get the shot, no matter what

In an April 29, 2021, opinion piece published by Newsday,1 Arthur Caplan and Dorit Reiss, Ph.D., argue for the implementation of vaccine passports as a strategy to regain our freedom to travel and the “safe” reopening of schools and businesses.

Caplan is the director of medical ethics at NYU Grossman School of Medicine and Reiss is a law professor at UC Hastings College of the Law and a member2 of the Parent Advisory Board of Voices of Vaccines.

Caplan is also co-chair of the Vaccines Working Group on Ethics and Policy, a group formed specifically to address “key policy challenges associated with the testing and distribution of vaccines intended to prevent COVID-19 transmission in the United States,” and Reiss is a member of the board.3

Part of their argument is that vaccinations have “always” been “necessary for travel,” which is patently false. Proof of vaccination requirements are rare, and strictly limited to travel to certain destinations where the risk of contracting a disease and bringing it back to a population with nonexistent immunity against it is high. You’ve never had to show proof of vaccination when flying to Paris, France, for example.

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One response to “The Rise of Utilitarian Extremism, and How to Recognize It, by Joseph Mercola

  1. This perversion of utilitarianism could bite the elite in the ass. Sacrificing some for the benefit of all points directly at them.

    Like

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