Category Archives: Collapse

Full Circle: Lessons of the Lost City in the Sands of Time, by Doug “Uncola” Lynn

Is a strange circular formation in the western Sahara the lost city of Atlantis? Doug “Uncola” Lynn ponders this question and what it means for our understanding of history. From Lynn at theburningplatform.com:

This post will be a little “outside of the box” so to speak. It’s more of an afterthought, really.  Therefore, it may not tie into current events and, specifically, the upcoming midterms and aftermath.  Or, in a roundabout way, it could be exactly about those coming events. Regardless, as always, it is the reader’s choice to tag along while simultaneously, and at your whim, possessing the power of the click.

Of course, that’s just one of the bonuses of being an internet animal.

Another includes the occasional morsels discovered when hunting and gathering online. These may often be feel-good stories that reassure one’s belief in humanity. Other examples might include new scientific breakthroughs that, at the time, are only reported on the shadowy fringes of the interwebic blogosphere.  Or maybe the tidbit is about a social, or health, tip that enriches one’s life. And, oftentimes, other postings are historical; even connecting antiquity with modernity in ways that resurrect the imaginations of childhood.

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You Want to Make America Great Again? Start by Making America Free Again, by John W. Whitehead

America is at its greatest when it is most free. From John W. Whitehead at rutherford.org:

“If the freedom of speech be taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter.”—George Washington

Living in a representative republic means that each person has the right to take a stand for what they think is right, whether that means marching outside the halls of government, wearing clothing with provocative statements, or simply holding up a sign.

That’s what the First Amendment is supposed to be about.

Yet through a series of carefully crafted legislative steps and politically expedient court rulings, government officials have managed to disembowel this fundamental freedom, rendering it with little more meaning than the right to file a lawsuit against government officials.

In the process, government officials have succeeded in insulating themselves from their constituents, making it increasingly difficult for average Americans to make themselves seen or heard by those who most need to hear what “we the people” have to say.

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The Lathe of Hell, by Holly O

Holly O is one of the best writers and stylists on the internet. Here she laments the fate of her country, continent, and what remains of Western Civilization. From theburningplatform.com:

There we were, having a good time, making money, making love and good music, bringing beauty into the world, building new things and Bang! we awakened to find totalitarian assholes in charge via some back door we were too busy, too happy and too satisfied to keep an eye on. The bill for those good times has now been delivered to our table and via some arcane calculus it appears we are presently held to account for all the bad in the world. It is time to pay up and pay up and pay up again until the parasites at last kill off their host and then I expect we will be blamed for desertion as well.

I was fined Ten Thousand Pounds Sterling for three essays I wrote last year. I like to think they may have been the most expensive essays anyone has ever paid to publish—cold comfort but I am willing to settle for it. All this left me in a bit of a strop so I flounced off for Points More Free, though so far my quest has proved fruitless; simply stated, for my kind—white and English-speaking—there appears to be nowhere left to run.

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Deregulation, by Tom Woods

Deregulation’s many benefits are seldom noticed, and it’s often blamed for the sins of regulation. From Tom Woods at lewrockwell.com:

Ten years after the financial crisis of 2008, your friends are still saying the same thing:

“Don’t you libertarians know the financial crisis was caused by deregulation?”

It was not in any way caused by deregulation. We have to get this right, and we can’t let it pass.

F.A. Hayek once noted how important history was to current events: if we misunderstand history, we’re going to do the wrong things in the present. So if we think the late nineteenth century was characterized by “monopolies” from which wise government officials rescued us (and, unfortunately, this is indeed what most people believe), we’ll have different views on antitrust law than we otherwise would. Likewise, if we think the Great Depression was caused by “laissez faire,” that will influence the kind of economic policy we advocate today.

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Robert Gore Said That? 10/10/18

On Septemeber 30, at Murphy, North Carolina, I addressed the Appalachian Network PATCON, a gathering of very bright people on the cutting edge of preparation for the coming catastrophe. The topic was: “How to Survive an Economic Collapse.”

Erasing History, Diplomacy, Truth, and Life on Earth, by Paul Craig Roberts and Stephen F. Cohen

You can make up fake history and news, but you can’t make up reality. From Paul Craig Roberts at paulcraigroberts.com:

One of the reasons that countries fail is that collective memory is continually destroyed as older generations pass away and are replaced by new ones who are disconnected from what came before.

Initially, the disconnect was handled by history and by discussions around family tables. For example, when I was a kid there were still grandparents whose fathers had fought for the Confederacy. They had no slaves and owned no plantations. They fought because their land was invaded by Lincoln’s armies. Today if Southern families still know the facts, they would protect their children by not telling them. Can you imagine what would happen to a child in a public school that took this position?

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The World Is Quietly Decoupling From the U.S. – And No One Is Paying Attention, by Brandon Smith

The world is finding ways to get around the US’s currency and its payment mechanisms. From Brandon Smith at birchgold.com:

Blind faith in the U.S. dollar is perhaps one of the most crippling disabilities economists have in gauging our economic future. Historically speaking, fiat currencies are essentially animals with very short lives, and world reserve currencies are even more prone to an early death. But, for some reason, the notion that the dollar is vulnerable at all to the same fate is deemed ridiculous by the mainstream.

This delusion has also recently bled into parts of the alternative economic movement, with some analysts hoping that the Trump Administration will somehow reverse several decades of central bank sabotage in only four to eight years. However, this thinking requires a person to completely ignore the prevailing trend.

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