The New Yorker Warns of ‘Creepy Infiltration’ of Chick-Fil-A Restaurants in New York City, by Thomas D. Williams

That “infiltration” couldn’t have anything to do with the fact that Chick-Fil-A makes darn good chicken sandwiches, could it? From Thomas D. Williams at breitbart.com:

The New Yorker announced in a blatantly anti-Christian essay Friday that the arrival of Chick-fil-A restaurants in New York City “feels like an infiltration, in no small part because of its pervasive Christian traditionalism.”

The April 13 article by Dan Piepenbring, ominously titled “Chick-fil-A’s Creepy Infiltration of New York City,” reads like old Ku Klux Klan propaganda against Catholics, Jews, and blacks. It is evident from the first line through the last that the only thing that disturbs Mr. Piepenbring about the restaurant chain is the overt Christian faith of its owners.

Apparently unaware of just how bigoted his essay sounds, Piepenbring offers as evidence of Chick-fil-A’s “creepiness” that its corporate headquarters in Atlanta “is adorned with Bible verses and a statue of Jesus washing a disciple’s feet. Its stores close on Sundays.”

It makes one shudder just to imagine it.

Mr. Piepenbring suggests, moreover, that there may be a sinister, “ulterior motive” behind the restaurant’s work, other than just selling chicken sandwiches, and it has to do with the G-word.

“The restaurant’s corporate purpose still begins with the words ‘to glorify God,’ and that proselytism thrums below the surface of the Fulton Street restaurant, which has the ersatz homespun ambiance of a megachurch,” the essay announces in what is clearly meant to be a frightening revelation.

As one observer has pointed out, the New Yorker would never dream of asking if Muslim- or Jewish-owned businesses should be allowed to “join” the New York community, but they believe it is perfectly acceptable to do so in the case of Christians.

Mr. Piepenbring has a particular issue with the Chick-fil-A “Cows,” which serve as the chain’s unofficial mascots.

The omnipresent Cows, he states, have “remained one of the most popular, and most morbid, advertising campaigns in fast-food history,” due in part to their mantra of “eat mor chikin.” What Piepenbring apparently finds to be “morbid” about the cows is their willingness to suggest that humans consume a fellow farm animal.

If this seems like a bit of a stretch, well, that’s because it is, but this does not deter Piepenbring in his quest to make readers believe there is something deeply troubling about Chick-fil-A.

“It’s worth asking why Americans fell in love with an ad in which one farm animal begs us to kill another in its place,” he writes.

“The joke is that the Cows are out of place in New York—a winking acknowledgment that Chick-fil-A, too, does not quite belong here,” he declares peremptorily.

To continue reading: The New Yorker Warns of ‘Creepy Infiltration’ of Chick-Fil-A Restaurants in New York City

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One response to “The New Yorker Warns of ‘Creepy Infiltration’ of Chick-Fil-A Restaurants in New York City, by Thomas D. Williams

  1. New Yorkers cannot deal with courtesy, politeness, nor superior food. This is one reason its such a hell hole.

    Liked by 1 person

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