Category Archives: Society

He Said That? 4/21/18

From Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900), German philosopher, cultural critic, composer, poet, philologist, and a Latin and Greek scholar, Beyond Good and Evil (1886):

Madness is something rare in individuals — but in groups, parties, peoples, and ages, it is the rule.

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Doug Casey on the Demise of Nation States

Doug Casey thinks nation-states are slated for extinction, not to be replaced with something even bigger and more centralized, but rather towards decentralization, autonomy, and interaction among those with common interests. From Casey at caseyresearch.com:

Justin’s note: Longtime readers know what Doug Casey thinks of nation states. He says they’ve mostly been an “inefficient, counterproductive, and expensive nuisance” and a “testimony to how thoughtless the average person is.”

He also says nation states are going out of business.

I recently called him up to get an update on where we are today… and what to expect going forward.

Today and tomorrow, I’m sharing our discussion. I think you’ll enjoy…


Justin: So, Doug. Are nation states really in decline?

Doug: They’re definitely in decline, and that’s a good thing—nothing to be concerned about. It’s cause for optimism. The question is why are they falling apart?

Some background. The concept of the nation state came about with the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648, something that everybody only vaguely remembers from a college history class. Actually, today’s students will probably never even hear of it. That class has likely been replaced with Gender Studies or Black History.

Why was it so important? It redirected the concept of “loyalty” away from an individual—a prince or a king—to the State itself. A geographical area now wasn’t so much the possession of a ruler, as a possession of a State. This really got the concept of nationalism going; nationalism is just tribalism writ large.

That’s how the concept was born. But the idea of a nation state is coming to an end. Now almost anybody can go almost anywhere thanks to jet travel; you’re no longer married to one place, like a medieval serf. And you can communicate with anybody anywhere on the planet thanks to the Internet; that makes it much harder to keep all the sheep thinking the same thing.

So, first, people realized that it’s completely ridiculous and dysfunctional to be loyal to some thug who, through an accident of birth or through military competence, set himself up as a prince. Now they’re discovering that it’s equally stupid to be loyal to a government that’s running a country.

To continue reading: Doug Casey on the Demise of Nation States

 

The New Yorker Warns of ‘Creepy Infiltration’ of Chick-Fil-A Restaurants in New York City, by Thomas D. Williams

That “infiltration” couldn’t have anything to do with the fact that Chick-Fil-A makes darn good chicken sandwiches, could it? From Thomas D. Williams at breitbart.com:

The New Yorker announced in a blatantly anti-Christian essay Friday that the arrival of Chick-fil-A restaurants in New York City “feels like an infiltration, in no small part because of its pervasive Christian traditionalism.”

The April 13 article by Dan Piepenbring, ominously titled “Chick-fil-A’s Creepy Infiltration of New York City,” reads like old Ku Klux Klan propaganda against Catholics, Jews, and blacks. It is evident from the first line through the last that the only thing that disturbs Mr. Piepenbring about the restaurant chain is the overt Christian faith of its owners.

Apparently unaware of just how bigoted his essay sounds, Piepenbring offers as evidence of Chick-fil-A’s “creepiness” that its corporate headquarters in Atlanta “is adorned with Bible verses and a statue of Jesus washing a disciple’s feet. Its stores close on Sundays.”

It makes one shudder just to imagine it.

Mr. Piepenbring suggests, moreover, that there may be a sinister, “ulterior motive” behind the restaurant’s work, other than just selling chicken sandwiches, and it has to do with the G-word.

“The restaurant’s corporate purpose still begins with the words ‘to glorify God,’ and that proselytism thrums below the surface of the Fulton Street restaurant, which has the ersatz homespun ambiance of a megachurch,” the essay announces in what is clearly meant to be a frightening revelation.

As one observer has pointed out, the New Yorker would never dream of asking if Muslim- or Jewish-owned businesses should be allowed to “join” the New York community, but they believe it is perfectly acceptable to do so in the case of Christians.

Mr. Piepenbring has a particular issue with the Chick-fil-A “Cows,” which serve as the chain’s unofficial mascots.

The omnipresent Cows, he states, have “remained one of the most popular, and most morbid, advertising campaigns in fast-food history,” due in part to their mantra of “eat mor chikin.” What Piepenbring apparently finds to be “morbid” about the cows is their willingness to suggest that humans consume a fellow farm animal.

If this seems like a bit of a stretch, well, that’s because it is, but this does not deter Piepenbring in his quest to make readers believe there is something deeply troubling about Chick-fil-A.

“It’s worth asking why Americans fell in love with an ad in which one farm animal begs us to kill another in its place,” he writes.

“The joke is that the Cows are out of place in New York—a winking acknowledgment that Chick-fil-A, too, does not quite belong here,” he declares peremptorily.

To continue reading: The New Yorker Warns of ‘Creepy Infiltration’ of Chick-Fil-A Restaurants in New York City

Sincere Questions in a World of Lies, by Doug “Uncola” Lynn

Doug “Uncola” Lynn asks a timeless and provocative question. From Lynn at theburningplatform.com:

When I was in high school we had an English teacher who had the kids carry the ring of a toilet seat to the bathroom instead of asking him for a hall pass.  Although this took place before the selfie and social media days, it was mentioned in passing as a humorous anecdote in a story printed in the school newsletter.  In turn, it was picked up by the city paper, then a regional publication, and by the time the “story” hit the national news, it had been twisted into the teacher forcing the students into wearing the toilet seat around their necks.

That was my first personal experience with hot air expanding up through the media stratosphere before, quite unscientifically, converting into bullshit raining down from on high.  It was like watching a game of “telephone”, whereby one media representative whispered “truth” into the earpiece of another, and onward up the line, until the national media was shouting “child abuse” through their collective bullhorns. Although each media outlet should have individually vetted the story they, instead, repeated the error of an earlier source.

Indeed, there are many reasons why lies travel around the world twice as the truth ties its shoes.  When searching for veracity in a world of deception, it’s like a wind forever blowing in our faces.  Fighting that gale is comparable to swimming the breast-stroke against a raging rapids, or rock-climbing in a bad hailstorm without a helmet: We get nowhere fast and end up with a thundering headache.

We stand at the edge of the abyss, at one-minute to midnight, in the black of a storm.  Pummeled by crosswinds of lies, we hear the sounds of war drums in the distance as the roar of economic uncertainty, and waves of debt and currency fluctuations pound the shoreline all around.

To continue reading: Sincere Questions in a World of Lies

Europe’s Civilizational Exhaustion, by Giulio Meotti

Europe and its culture are dying and may already be doomed. From Giulio Meotti at gatestoneinstitute.org:

  • Islam is filling the cultural vacuum of a society with no children and which believes — wrongly — it has no enemies.
  • In Sweden, by 2050, almost one in three people will be Muslim.
  • The European mainstream mindset now seems to believe that “evil” comes only from our own sins: racism, sexism, elitism, xenophobia, homophobia, the guilt of the heterosexual white Western male — and never from non-European cultures. Europe now postulates an infinite idealization of the “other”, above all the migrant.
  • A tiredness seems to be why these countries do not take meaningful measures to defeat jihadism, such as closing Salafist mosques or expelling radical imams.
  • Muslim extremists understand this advantage: so long as they avoid another enormous massacre like 9/11, they will be able to continue taking away human lives and undermining the West without awakening it from its inertia.

In a prophetic conference held in Vienna on May 7, 1935, the philosopher Edmund Husserl said, “The greatest danger to Europe is tiredness”. Eighty years later, the same fatigue and passivity still dominate Western European societies.

It is the sort of exhaustion that we see in Europeans’ falling birth rates, the mushrooming public debt, chaos in the streets, and Europe’s refusal to invest resources in its security and military might. Last month, in a Paris suburb, the Basilica of Saint Denis, where France’s Christian kings are buried, was occupied by 80 migrants and pro-illegal-immigration activists. The police had to intervene to free the site.

Pictured: French police eject some of the 80 migrants and pro-illegal-immigration activists who occupied the Basilica of Saint Denis, on March 18, 2018. (Image source: Video screenshot, YouTube/Kenyan News & Politics)

Stephen Bullivant, a professor of theology and the sociology of religion at St Mary’s University in London, recently published a report, “Europe’s Young Adults and Religion”:

“Christianity as a default, as a norm, is gone, and probably gone for good – or at least for the next 100 years,” Bullivant said.

According to Bullivant, many young Europeans “will have been baptised and then never darken the door of a church again. Cultural religious identities just aren’t being passed on from parents to children. It just washes straight off them… “And we know the Muslim birthrate is higher than the general population, and they have much higher [religious] retention rates.”

To continue reading: Europe’s Civilizational Exhaustion

They Fight the Law and the Law Wins, by Doug “Uncola” Lynn

A corrupt nation veers towards collapse. What happens afterwards? From Doug “Uncola” Lynn at theburningplatform.com:

I saw the tears of the oppressed—

and they have no comforter;

power was on the side of their oppressors….

–  Ecclesiastes 4:1

 

In viewing the daily headlines and reading various online blogs, it appears many of these have converged into discussions on law and rights.  Two examples of ongoing national conversations include mass shootings versus theSecond Amendment and Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s preference for prosecution of process crimes in a bogus election hacking conspiracy, over a real investigation into documented corruption at the highest levels of American government.

On April Fools Day it was revealed the Washington DC permits for the March 24, 2018 “March for Our Lives” event were acquired months before the Parkland Shooting even took place. The irony is palpable.  One would think that would be the smoking gun (pun intended) evidence of a conspiracy, but no.  Nothing shall prevent the children from wielding their emotional wounds, like a Samurai sword in a Tarantino flick, against the Second Amendment; and Laura Ingraham’s right to free speech.

The very next day, on April 2, 2018, Deerfield, Illinois nullified the U.S. Constitution and gave their residents 60 days to turn in their guns or face fines of $1,000 per day per gun.

The day after that, on April 3, 2018, a previously undisclosed memo was unveiled proving illegal collusionbetween Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and his co-conspirator, Robert Mueller, in the special counsel investigation of President Trump.

 

An August 2017 memo from Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein to Special Counsel Robert Mueller surfaced late Monday evening in a court filing. Mueller used the memo to defend his scope of the investigation against a recent motion Manafort filed to dismiss his case.

In the heavily redacted memo, Robert Mueller admits Rosenstein’s order appointing him to Special Counsel was intentionally vague.

‘This violates the special counsel law that requires a specific statement of facts to be investigated’, says Attorney Gregg Jarrett.

So let’s get this straight: Rosenstein, who appointed Mueller to be special counsel, signed off on at least one of the misrepresented, and therefore illegal, FISA applications on Team Trump for a counterintelligence investigation.  His aforementioned August 2, 2017 memo to Mueller is now being used to justify the July 26, 2017 home invasion on Paul Manafort after it happened.  Now Mueller is, instead, investigating Trump for possible obstruction of justice for firing former FBI Director, James Comey.

To continue reading: They Fight the Law and the Law Wins

A Last Look at The West That Was, by John Moon

Within the memory of one generation, America was a very different place than it is now. From John Moon at thesaker.is:

Then:

Sputnik 1 was launched in October, 1957. I remember exactly where I was when the news story broke on the radio. My friend and I were being driven to a high school football game by his father, an aeronautical engineer at one of the largest manufacturers of helicopter rotor blades in the world. News of Sputnik was so important that he pulled the car to the side of the road so the three of us could listen to the lengthy newscast without distraction.

The following year in 1958, at the height of the Cold War, an unknown 23 year old American pianist won the International Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow. Despite the tension between the two countries, the Soviets treated him graciously before he returned home to a hero’s welcome. A fine example of the “promotion of world friendship through the universal language of the arts”, which was a sentiment inscribed prominently at the venue where I met Van Cliburn less than a decade later.

At age 11 I joined the Boy Scouts. Our troop was led by an exceptional man, kind, strict, and strong, who believed that the best way for boys to learn was by doing. Every three weeks during the school year, we went on a weekend camping trip. Good weather or bad, we went.

Building fires, we were each allowed one kitchen match, whether the firewood was wet or dry; whether it was windy or not. Success was anticipated, and so usually internalized. Failure meant (marginally) good natured jeers from the others, and the next boy would test his skill and try his match.

Occasionally on a moonlit night we’d be awakened at 1 AM, and told to collect a compass, matches, canteen, and flashlight, as we were going on a hike. We’d be led along a river or road for a ways, and then led off into the woods on one side or the other. After a kilometre or two of fast walking away from the road through the bush in the dark, we’d be broken into groups of 3 or 4, with one being an older boy. The group would be told to wait for 15 minutes, and then find its way back to camp. More experienced groups would be led farther on and told the same. Other than illuminating the compass from time to time, use of a flashlight was discouraged, and shouting was strictly forbidden. We learned to keep calm, and realize that all we had to do was use our compass and common sense to intersect the road or stream, which would then lead us back to camp. Sounds easy now, but when you’re 12 years old it was less so.

To continue reading: A Last Look at The West That Was