Category Archives: Society

Feeling the Heat Yet? by James Howard Kunstler

Nothing either party does is going to prevent the house from burning down, and most of what they do only fan the flames. From James Howard Kunstler at kunstler.com:

The loyal opposition is the party out-of-power in a polity that stands divided into two factions — assuming the polity can still function as such, which, apparently, it no longer can. Historically in the USA, this used to allow for the tempered regulation of changing conditions during two hundred years of a rapidly evolving techno-industrial economy that pumps out more goodies year after year while the population grows and grows.

Much of America, political leaders especially, assume that this arc of growing goodies and more people will just keep trending up forever. They are just plain mistaken about that. Rather, the whole industrialized, wired-up world is rolling over into the greatest contraction ever witnessed. The only thing that’s postponed the recognition of this reality is the profligate borrowing of money, or shall we say “money” — data entries that pretend to represent secure wealth. This amounts to borrowing from the future to pay for how you live today. Of course, the act of borrowing is based on the supposition that there will enough future productive activity to allow you to pay back your borrowings with interest. This is obviously not the case now, in the face of epochal contraction, especially of affordable energy to keep things running hot.

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The Lathe of Hell, by Holly O

Holly O is one of the best writers and stylists on the internet. Here she laments the fate of her country, continent, and what remains of Western Civilization. From theburningplatform.com:

There we were, having a good time, making money, making love and good music, bringing beauty into the world, building new things and Bang! we awakened to find totalitarian assholes in charge via some back door we were too busy, too happy and too satisfied to keep an eye on. The bill for those good times has now been delivered to our table and via some arcane calculus it appears we are presently held to account for all the bad in the world. It is time to pay up and pay up and pay up again until the parasites at last kill off their host and then I expect we will be blamed for desertion as well.

I was fined Ten Thousand Pounds Sterling for three essays I wrote last year. I like to think they may have been the most expensive essays anyone has ever paid to publish—cold comfort but I am willing to settle for it. All this left me in a bit of a strop so I flounced off for Points More Free, though so far my quest has proved fruitless; simply stated, for my kind—white and English-speaking—there appears to be nowhere left to run.

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Most of Us Are NOT Participating in the Hysterical Rage You See on the News, by Daisy Luther

When was the last time you slugged someone? For most of us the answer is probably years, if not decades. From Daisy Luther at theorganicprepper.com:

If you were to read about the United States of America from someplace else, you’d probably think it was a nation full of people who are gearing up to go to war. Anyone would think the same thing from what they saw in the media. You would see hysterical rage fueling terrible acts. You’d see the intense hatred between people who belong to different political parties. You’d believe this is nationwide.

But it’s not. Sure, there’s some tension if you talk politics, but in most places, it isn’t crazy in a life-threatening kind of way. Mostly, it’s pretty friendly.

But this isn’t the America of the media.

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A Clockwork Orange: Waiting for the Sun, by Doug “Uncola” Lynch

This will appeal to a certain type of philosophically speculative mind. From Doug  “Uncola” Lynn at theburningplatform.com:

 Society should not do the wrong thing for the right reason, even though it frequently does the right thing for the wrong reason.

History has shown us what happens when you try to make society too civilized, or do too good a job of eliminating undesirable elements. It also shows the tragic fallacy in the belief that the destruction of democratic institutions will cause better ones to arise in their place.

Stanley Kubrick on “A Clockwork Orange”, an interview with film critic Michel Ciment

An obscure Texas political consultant named Bill Miller once said “politics is show business for ugly people”.  It’s true for the most part, aside from the consequences.  This is because the theatrics of politicians result in policies that affect the lives of others; often against the will of the governed. In books and movies, however, the characters are much ado about nothing. Until, that is, life imitates art.

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Doug Casey on the “Politically Correct” Movement

The problem with the politically correct movement is not so much their weird tenets, but that they insist everyone accept those tenets as normal. From Doug Casey at caseyresearch.com:

Justin’s note: As regular Dispatch readers know, every Friday we feature no-filtered insights from Doug Casey. You see, Doug isn’t just a world-class speculator. He’s a rare, independent thinker and a walking encyclopedia. Best of all, he isn’t afraid to speak his mind. It’s no surprise that these interviews have been a favorite among our readers.

Today, Doug and I talk about why the “politically correct” or “PC” movement is destroying America…


Justin Spittler: Doug, I want to ask you about political correctness. Obviously, PC culture’s nothing new, but it kind of seems like it’s spreading like cancer these days. Terms like “gender inclusivity,” “cultural appropriation,” and “white privilege” are everywhere.

A good example is last year’s announcement by the University of Minnesota… saying it was dropping the names “Homecoming King and Queen” in favor of “Royals.” It did this in the name of “gender inclusivity.”

Is PC culture getting totally out of hand, or am I going crazy?

Doug Casey: Parts of the culture are borderline insane. There’ve been news items regarding this on scores of different colleges and universities across the US. What you mentioned at the University of Minnesota was just part of a greater movement. Although I’ve got to say that I find the use of “Royals” objectionable. I dislike the idea of a hereditary aristocracy—kings and queens and royals. They’re basically just successful, silk-clad gangsters. Why the royal family in Britain is looked up to is a mystery to me. They, like all royals in the world, historically are just descendants of successful thugs Continue reading

Towers to Heaven: The Alchemy of Prophecy, Terror, and Unity, by Doug “Uncola” Lynn

Does evil signal its intentions in popular culture? As usual, Doug “Uncola” Lynn asks this and other provocative questions. From Lynn at theburningplatform.com:

They had as king over them the angel of the Abyss, whose name in Hebrew is Abaddon and in Greek is Apollyon (that is, Destroyer).

– Revelation 9:11

 

At the end of last month, I read an article that claimed Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation was foretold by a “20 Year Old Movie”. The film was a 1998 thriller entitled “Enemy of the State” starring Will Smith and Gene Hackman.

My curiosity aroused, I selected the show from my electronic catalog and watched it unwind; similar to the way I once queued up songs on jukeboxes in the halcyon days preceding the matrix.

In the film, Gene Hackman played an Edward Snowden-type National Security Agency (NSA) contractor gone rogue who revealed to the viewers the U.S. government’s high-tech surveillance capabilities. Two decades ago when the film was released, the surveillance grid disclosed therein would have seemed far-fetched. But not today. Now, in the aftermath of 911, the Patriot Act, and the Snowden revelations, those capabilities are not only common knowledge, but are the subjects of ongoing daily headlines.

The antagonist in the film was played by Jon Voight, a power-hungry NSA bureaucrat who assembled a team of technology experts and security agents that blackmailed Congress and even murdered a senator.  The politician was killed to aid the passing of a Patriot Act-style bill that would have, in effect, drilled the final screw into the coffin of the Fourth Amendment.

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Apocalypse, Or Not? by Alasdair Macleod

The end of the American government as we know will be traumatic, but it need not be the end of the world. From Alasdair Macleod at goldmoney.com:

Members of the American libertarian movement, particularly extremist preppers, are often associated with a belief that a complete breakdown in society is the only outcome from government economic policies and will lead to complete social disintegration. At the centre of their concerns is monetary destruction, with other issues, such as the erosion of personal freedom and the right to bear arms, important but peripheral. They cite history, particularly the hyperinflationary collapses, from Rome to Zimbabwe, and now Venezuela. They draw on Austrian economic theory, which fans their dislike of government and their expectation of total chaos.

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