The Pentagon Papers’ Legacy After 50 Years, by Peter Van Buren

Compare the Pentagon Papers to what Julian Assange has had to endure and it shows just how far journalism has fallen the last fifty years. From Peter Van Buren at theamericanconservative.com:

The courage of all those involved, including journalists at the New York Times, has all but vanished after half a century.

Pentagon Papers leaker Daniel Ellsberg speaks at a rally in Washington, D.C. (Joseph Sohm/Shutterstock)

It was a humid June on the east coast 50 years ago when the New York Times began publishing the Pentagon Papers. The anniversary is worth marking, for reasons sweeping and grand, and for reasons deeply personal.

In 1971 Daniel Ellsberg leaked the Pentagon Papers, a secret U.S. government history of the Vietnam War, to the Times. No one had ever published such classified documents before, and reporters feared prosecution under the Espionage Act. A federal court ordered the Times to cease publication after an initial flurry of excerpts were printed, the first time in U.S. history a federal judge had invoked prior restraint and shattered the First Amendment.

In a legal battle too important to have been written first as a novel, the NYT fought back. The Supreme Court on June 30, 1971 handed down a victory for the First Amendment in New York Times Company v. United States, and the Times won the Pulitzer Prize. The Papers helped convince Americans the Vietnam War was wrong, their government could not be trusted, and The People informed by a free press could still have a say in things. Today, journalists expect a Pulitzer for a snarky tweet.

In our current shameful state, where the MSM serves as an organ of the deep state, the Papers also serve as a reminder to millennials OnlyFansing as journalists that there were once people in their jobs who valued truth and righteousness. Perhaps this anniversary may inspire some MSM propagandist to realize he might still run with lions instead of slinking home to feed his cats.

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