Tag Archives: immigrants

Nearly Two-Thirds of Non-Citizen Households on Welfare, by Joe Schaeffer

SLL has said ad nauseum that open arms welfare states are not compatible with welcome mat immigration policies. From Joe Schaeffer at libertynation.com:

Another day, another revelation as the great fleecing of the U.S. taxpayer continues unabated. A Center for Immigration Studies review of U.S. Census Bureau data reveals a stunning 63% of households in the U.S. headed by non-citizens are on some form of welfare. That’s just shy of two out of every three proving to be a burden to the American people. So much for the lie that massive immigration enriches our nation.

Dead Weight

The information CIS uncovered is infuriating in a number of ways. The 63% figure is almost twice the rate of native-headed American households that use welfare, which is a disturbingly high 35% as it is. But non-citizen households (45%) also utilize food programs at a much higher rate than natives (21%), and disproportionately tap into Medicaid programs as well (50% vs. 23%).

The most telling statistic in the review, however, is that welfare use rises among non-citizens the longer they are in our country. “Of households headed by non-citizens in the United States for fewer than 10 years, 50 percent use one or more welfare programs; for those here more than 10 years, the rate is 70 percent,” CIS discovered.

Rather than serving as a temporary safety net, our welfare programs are proving to be a lifestyle staple for non-citizens sponging off the American taxpayer. Of course, many of these non-citizens do work, but they are low-skilled Hispanics from Central America laboring at poverty-level jobs. A 2015 CIS report found that 67% of households headed by immigrant farm workers are on public assistance of some form. Swollen-eyed Big Ag industrial farmers crying out about the need to find workers willing to do “the jobs Americans won’t do” are in fact having their cheap payrolls subsidized by the welfare programs of this nation.

Bitter Factors

At a time when native-born Americans are working long hours with less vacation time and fewer benefits, we are being forced to carry the millstone of foreign squatters on our backs. Massive immigration has led to overcrowded cities and towns, aggravating traffic congestion that leads to an even more draining daily commute for Americans just so we can we have the privilege of having our wages heavily taxed to financially support the very same invaders who are making our work day more exhausting. This is madness.

Immigrants also suppress wages, especially for low-skilled workers, so that 35% figure of natives utilizing some form of welfare may be so high in part due to the fact that the non-citizens abusing our welfare programs are also making it impossible for a portion of our citizen population to find decent-paying jobs. Thus non-native interlopers are increasing the welfare burden beyond just what they actively take for themselves.

The Trump administration’s Department of Homeland Security has released a draft proposal to prevent immigration by those who are likely to be a public burden on the American people. This new CIS report overwhelmingly confirms the urgent need for such a policy. Anyone opposing this sane safeguard through hollow accusations of “racism” or self-serving pleas for cheap labor is an enemy to the American working man and woman. And we will remember them for it.

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Choosing Your Immigrants, by Jeff Thomas

Once upon a time immigrants didn’t come to America for handouts, because there wasn’t any. From Jeff Thomas at internationalman.com:

In the 18th century, America was made up primarily of people who, of necessity, had had to work hard. Had they not taken full responsibility for their own welfare, there was no one else to do it for them and they would have starved. As this was the case, anyone who did arrive on American shores who was unwilling to work and wanted others to provide for him, could expect to find no sympathy and might well starve.

In the 19th century, the former colonies had become the United States. Expansion was underway and the young people of the 18th century became the entrepreneurs of the 19th century. In order to continue to get the menial tasks accomplished, millions of immigrants were needed. Those who were welcomed were those who were prepared to start at the bottom, often live in poor conditions, receive no entitlements and compete for even menial jobs. If they accepted these terms, they received the opportunity to immigrate and work.

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