Tag Archives: Ray Dalio

Some common sense advice from two billionaires, by Simon Black

Be prepared, the U.S. government’s unsustainable debt will have disastrous consequences. From Simon Black at sovereignman.com:

Elon Musk didn’t have a care in the world last week as he hilariously mocked questions in a live interview with the Wall Street Journal.

The Journal’s reporter had essentially prepared a number of softball questions designed for Elon to praise the US government’s new ‘Build Back Better’ bill.

If you haven’t heard, the legislation contains a number of provisions which should greatly benefit Tesla, including major subsidies to build electric vehicle charging stations across the US.

But Elon had no interest in the puff piece.

“Unnecessary,” he interjected when the reporter started to ask what he thought of the subsidies.

“Do we need support for gas stations? We don’t. So there’s no need for support for a charging network. I’d delete it. Delete.”

This left the reporter flummoxed… how could Elon possibly not be excited about “free” government money that would support his business?

But Elon’s point seemed completely lost on her.

“Seriously we shouldn’t pass it,” Elon continued, almost exasperated.

“If we don’t cut government spending, something really bad is going to happen. This is crazy. Our spending is so far in excess of revenue its insane. You could zero out all billionaires in the country… you still wouldn’t solve the deficit.”

So the reporter said, well, let’s change the subject.

Elon then sounded-off on issues like the rise of China and corresponding decline of the US. He also called declining birth rates “one of the biggest risks to civilization.”

Now, Elon Musk is a famously eccentric character.

But another more ‘traditional’ billionaire is also on board with this ethos.

Ray Dalio founded and runs the largest hedge fund in the world, Bridgewater Associates.

He has been very vocal over the past several years about the pathetic state of US government finances, and obvious shift of wealth and power away from the US.

Continue reading→

Dalio’s $13 Billion Short: Bridgewater Unveils Its Biggest Ever Short Position, by Tyler Durden

The world’s largest hedge fund complex is making a big bet against Italian and Spanish financial stocks, and a few European industrial concerns. From Tyler Durden at zerohedge.com:

Last October, Italy’s government was angry when the world’s largest hedge fund, Ray Dalio’s Bridgewater unveiled it had amassed a sizable  $713 million short against Italian financial stocks, its biggest disclosed bearish bet in Europe.

Then last week, and just one month before Italy’s March 4 elections – which the broader market stubbornly refuses to acknowledge are a risk factor – Bridgewater tripled down on its bearish bets against Italian banks and insurers, making the position the largest thematic short carried by the world’s biggest hedge fund.

As we reported last Thursday, Bridgewater boosted its bearish bets against Italian companies to $3 billion and 18 firms, up four-fold from just over $713 million in early October, further infuriating Italian authorities. As Bloomberg added, Bridgewater’s bearish bets against European companies as a whole totaled $3.3 billion, spread among 20 names.  In addition to his previous negative exposure, Dalio disclosed a short position in transport-infrastructure provider Atlantia and added to its largest short bet, against lender Intesa Sanpaolo SpA.

The growing short comes just days after Dalio told a Davos audience that “holding cash is now stupid”… and literally days before the biggest market crash since Lehman.

Fast forward to today, when Dalio’s bearish fascination is starting to get a little concerning, because according to the latest Bloomberg summary, Bridgewater now has at least $13.1 billion in European Union shorts, quadrupling the $3.2 billion short from last week, and over 18 times more than the fund’s original position last October.

In the past week, Bridgewater put more than $1 billion to work betting against oil giant Total SA – making it the firm’s largest disclosed short holding in Europe. 

As Bloomberg notes, Europe’s energy titan has been riding out the biggest industry downturn in a generation by selling assets and cutting spending. The hedge fund also started a bearish Airbus SE position, investing about $381 million against the aircraft maker. Among other short positions, it disclosed wagers against BNP Paribas SA, ING Groep NV and Banco Santander SA.

Amusingly, since the Feb. 8 regulatory filings were made public, Total fell 1% as markets slumped, while Dalio’s other shorts, Airbus, BNP Paribas, ING Groep and Banco Santander sank roughly 2%.

To continue reading: Dalio’s $13 Billion Short: Bridgewater Unveils Its Biggest Ever Short Position

 

Ray Dalio’s Shorting The Entire EU, by Raúl Ilargi Meijer

The head of the world’s biggest hedge fund complex is bearish on Europe. From Raúl Ilargi Meijer at theautomaticearth.com:

A point BOE Governor Mark Carney made recently may be the biggest cog in the European Union’s wheel (or is it second biggest? Read on). That is, derivatives clearing. It’s one of the few areas where Brussels stands to lose much more than London, but it’s a big one. And Carney puts a giant question mark behind the EU’s preparedness.

Carney Reveals Europe’s Potential Achilles Heel in Brexit Talks

Carney explained why Europe’s financial sector is more at risk than the UK from a “hard” or “no-deal” Brexit. [..] When asked does the European Council “get it” in terms of potential shocks to financial stability, Carney diplomatically commented that “a learning process is underway.” Having sounded alarm bells about clearing in his last Mansion House speech, he noted “These costs of fragmenting clearing, particularly clearing of interest rate swaps, would be born principally by the European real economy and they are considerable.”

Calling into question the continuity of tens of thousands of derivative contracts , he stated that it was “pretty clear they will no longer be valid”, that this “could only be solved by both sides” and has been “underappreciated” by Europe . Carney had a snipe at Europe for its lack of preparation “We are prepared as we should be for the possibility of a hard exit without any transition…there has been much less of that done in the European Union.”

In Carneys view “It’s in the interest of the EU 27 to have a transition agreement. Also, in my judgement given the scale of the issues as they affect the EU 27, that there will ultimately be a transition agreement. There is a very limited amount of time between now and the end of March 2019 to transition large, complex institutions and activities…

If one thinks about the implementation of Basel III, we are alone in the current members of the EU in having extensive experience of managing the transition for individual firms of various derivative and risk activities from one jurisdiction back into the UK. That tends to take 2-4 years. Depending on the agreement, we are talking about a substantial amount of activity.” [..] “I wouldn’t want to use financial stability issues as leverage. I wouldn’t want them to be addressed in a bloodless technocratic way in the interests of all the citizens.”

To continue reading: Ray Dalio’s Shorting The Entire EU

Why Hedge Fund Hot Shots Finally Got Hammered, by David Stockman

From David Stockman at davidstockmanscontracorner.com:

The destruction of honest financial markets by the Fed and other central banks has created a class of hedge fund hot shots that are truly hard to take. Many of them have been riding the bubble ever since Alan Greenspan got it going after the crash of 1987 and now not only claim to be investment geniuses, but also get downright huffy if the Fed or anyone else threatens to roil the casino.

Leon Cooperman, who is an ex-Goldman trader and now proprietor of a giant fund called Omega Advisors, is one of the more insufferable blowhards among these billionaire bubble riders. Earlier this week he proved that in spades.

It seems that his fund had a thundering loss of more than 10% in August during a downdraft in the stock market that the Fed for once took no action to counter. But rather than accept responsibility for the fact that his portfolio of momo stocks took a dive during a wobbly tape, Cooperman put out a screed blaming the purportedly unfair tactics of other casino gamblers:

Lee Cooperman, the founder of Omega Advisors, has joined the growing chorus of investors blaming last week’s stock market sell-off — and his own poor performance in August — on esoteric but increasingly influential trading strategies pioneered by hedge funds like Bridgewater.

Well now. Exactly how was Bridgewater counting the cards so as to cause such a ruction at the gaming tables?

In a word, Ray Dalio, the storied founder of the giant Bridgewater “All-Weather” risk parity fund, has been doing the same thing as Cooperman, and for nearly as many decades. Namely, counting the cards held-out in plain public view by the foolish monetary central planners domiciled in the Eccles Building.

To be sure, Dalio’s fund has had superlative returns and there is undoubtedly some serious algorithmic magic embedded in Bridgewater’s computers. But at the end of the day its all a function of broken capital markets that have been usurped and rigged by the Fed.

To continue reading: Why Hedge Fund Hot Shots Finally Got Hammered

They Said That? 3/6/15

Oh what do these guys know? Two of the all-time most successful hedge fund operators, Ray Dalio and Stan Druckenmiller, and one of the all-time most successful bond fund managers, Bill Gross, have this to say about debt:

“It’s the end of the supercycle. It’s the end of the great debt cycle.” -Ray Dalio

“Corporate debt was $3.5 trillion– in 2007, arguably a period and– many would describe as bubbly. It’s 7 trillion now. So it’s gone from 3.5 trillion to 7 trillion. As you know, most of that mix has been in more highly leveraged stuff, Covenant-Lite loans– high yield, that’s where the majority of the rise has been. And if you look at corporations have been using it for, it’s all financial engineering.” -Stan Druckenmiller

“In the past 20 to 30 years, credit has grown to such an extreme globally that debt levels and the ability to service that debt are at risk, relative to the private investment world. Why doesn’t the debt supercycle keep expanding? Because there are limits.” -Bill Gross

“The process of lowering interest rates causing higher levels of debt, debt service and spending, I think is coming to an end.” – Ray Dalio

“The implications are much lower growth, less inflation, lower interest rates, and less profit growth.” -Bill Gross

“We brought consumption forward and issued one giant credit card for the past 30 years. Now the bill is coming due. Investors need to get used to low returns, and low growth, inflation, and interest rates for a long time.” -Bill Gross

“Central banks have largely lost their power to ease… We now have a situation in which we have largely no spreads and so as a result the transmission mechanism of monetary policy will be less effective. This is a big thing… So I worry on the downside ’cause the downside will come.” -Ray Dalio

All quotes are from “Scary Words From Dalio, Druckenmiller & Gross,” davidstockmanscontracorner.com.