When the “Fix” Increases Systemic Fragility, Things Fall Apart, by Charles Hugh Smith

Sometimes purported cures don’t cure anything, they just mask the patient’s deterioration. Such has been the case with the economic cures for the last financial crisis peddled by policymakers. From Charles Hugh Smith at oftwominds.com:

All the “fixes” have fatally weakened the real economy, and created a dangerous illusion of “wealth,” “growth” and solvency.

The “fix” of the last eight years worked, right? This was the status quo’s “fix”:
1. Massive expansion of debt: sovereign, household and corporate, all in service of a) bringing consumer demand forward b) fiscal stimulus funded by debt c) corporate stock buybacks to boost stock valuations d) asset bubbles in real estate, bonds, stocks, bat guano futures, etc.
2. Monetary stimulus, i.e. creating and distributing money at the top of the wealth/power pyramid so corporations and the super-wealthy could buy more assets with free money for financiers issued by central banks.
3. Gaming statistics such as unemployment and metrics such as stock indices to generate the illusion of “growth,” “stability” and “wealth.”
4. Saying all the right things: the “recovery” is creating millions of jobs, inflation is low, virtue-signaling is more important than actual increases in inflation-adjusted wages, etc.
As Dave of the X22 Report and I discuss in Central Banks Weakened The Economy To The Point Of No Return, Day Of Reckoning Has Arrived (42 min. podcast), this “fix” has fatally weakened the real economy. The cost of maintaining the illusions of “growth,” “stability,” “wealth” and solvency is extremely high, and hidden from view: systemic fragility has increased to the point of brittleness.
What is fragility? Fragility is the result of an erosion of resilience, redundancy, adaptability, accountability, honesty, feedback and willingness to sacrifice today’s consumption for tomorrow’s productivity and systemic stability.
The status quo “fix” has gutted resilience, redundancy, adaptability, accountability, honesty, feedback and willingness to sacrifice today’s consumption for tomorrow’s productivity. Can anyone who isn’t a lackey on the payroll of the Powers That Be provide any credible evidence that the U.S. economy is more resilient after eight years of debt-dependent “recovery”?
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s