Tag Archives: central bank policies

The Trade War Distraction: Huawei And Linchpin Theory, by Brandon Smith

The trade war will serve as a convenient scapegoat for crashing markets when its actually central bankers who are responsible. From Brandon Smith at alt-market.com:

Since the beginning of this year, I have been warning that trade tariffs initiated by Donald Trump would develop into a full-blown trade war with China, and perhaps other nations, and that the timing of this trade war is rather suspicious. Suspicious how? Almost every instance of further escalation was made by Trump around the exact time that the Federal Reserve was also making a large cut to its balance sheet or raising interest rates. Instead of focusing on the fact that extreme volatility has returned to markets because central banks are pulling the plug on life support, the mainstream media is holding up the trade war as the ultimate culprit behind the accelerating crash.

In other words, Trump’s trade war is acting as a perfect distraction from the crisis which the banking establishment has now deliberately triggered.

The initial response to my suggestion by a minority of liberty movement activists and skeptics was outright denial. Some people argued that the trade war would be over before it even began and that China would immediately capitulate in fear of losing the U.S. consumer market. Others argued that the trade war “had been started by the Chinese years ago” and Trump was simply “fighting back.”

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It’s possible the decline has already begun. . . by Simon Black

It is quite possible the stock market has already put it a top that will stand for many years. From Simon Black at sovereignman.com:

October can be an unforgiving month.

The terrible stock market crash that signaled the beginning of the Great Depression was in October of 1929.

The stock market crash known as Black Monday was in October of 1987.

In 1997, the Asian financial crisis sparked another stock market crash in… you guessed it—October.

And back in 2007 at the height of the giant bubble that almost brought down the entire financial system, the stock market peaked once again in… October.

It’s not that October is particular cursed. Maybe it’s just a coincidence. But I do find it strangely ominous that asset prices seemed to have peaked last month (October) and have been in decline ever since.

Real estate prices are starting to show signs of strain; more than one-third of homes for sale had a large price cut in October– the most discounting in the past eight years.

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Understanding the Global Recession of 2019, by Charles Hugh Smith

More debt as a solution to the 2008-2009 debt crisis was never going to work out. From Charles Hugh Smith at oftwominds.com:

Isn’t it obvious that repeating the policies of 2009 won’t be enough to save the system from a long-delayed reset?

2019 is shaping up to be the year in which all the policies that worked in the past will no longer work. As we all know, the Global Financial Meltdown / recession of 2008-09 was halted by the coordinated policies of the major central banks, which lowered interest rates to near-zero, bought trillions of dollars of bonds and iffy assets such as mortgage-backed securities, and issued unlimited lines of credit to insolvent banks, i.e. unlimited liquidity.

Central governments which could do so went on a borrowing / spending binge to boost demand in their economies, and pursued other policies designed to bring demand forward, i.e. incentivize households to buy today what they’d planned to buy in the future.

This vast flood of low-cost credit and liquidity encouraged corporations to borrow money and use it to buy back their stocks, boosting per-share earnings and sending stocks higher for a decade.

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The Demise Of Bubble Finance And The Folly Of Trump-O-Nomics, by David Stockman

Central banks are pulling the rug out from other bubble finance and other Wall Street fun and games. From David Stockman at davidstockmanscontracorner.com via zerohedge.com:

We are at a decisive pivot point and its far more consequential than the mid-term elections. Even then, we cannot but marvel at the utter complacency which still prevails in the casino.

We even heard one bubblevision talking head today suggesting that on the off-chance that the GOP retains the US House of Representatives (the Senate is virtually guaranteed to stay Republican), it will be mighty bullish for stocks. That’s because it would mean more fiscal stimulus, presumably another tax cut of the 10%/$200 billion cost variety that the Donald has been plugging out on the hustings.

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Where The Next Financial Crisis Begins, by Global Macro Monitor

The central banks will not be monetizing as much government debt as they have been, they may become net sellers. This has profound implications for financial markets. From the Global Macro Monitor at macromon.wordpress.com:

We are not sure of how the next financial crisis will exactly unfold but reasonably confident it will have its roots in the following analysis.   Maybe it has already begun.

The U.S. Treasury market is the center of the financial universe and the 10-year yield is the most important price in the world, of which, all other assets are priced.   We suspect the next major financial crisis may not be in the Treasury market but will most likely emanate from it.

U.S. Public Sector Debt Increase Financed By Central Banks 

The U.S. has had a free ride for this entire century, financing its rapid runup in public sector debt,  from 58 percent of GDP at year-end 2002, to the current level of 105 percent, mostly by foreign central banks and the Fed.

Marketable debt, in particular, notes and bonds, which drive market interest rates have increased by over $9 trillion during the same period, rising from 20 percent to 55 percent of GDP.

Central bank purchases, both the Fed and foreign central banks, have, on average, bought 63 percent of the annual increase in U.S. Treasury notes and bonds from 2003 to 2018.  Note their purchases can be made in the secondary market, or, in the case of foreign central banks,  in the monthly Treasury auctions.

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It Ain’t So, Alan! Why Greenspanian Central Banking Is the Mortal Enemy of Capitalist Prosperity, by David Stockman

By David Stockman’s calculations, US unemployment is 40 percent. From Stockman at davidstockmanscontracorner.com via lewrockwell.com:

We can thank bubblevision and the Maestro himself for a splendid reminder today that Greenspanian central banking is the greatest menace to capitalist prosperity ever invented. This was made abundantly clear by his pronouncement on CNBC regarding the current labor market:

Tightest labor market I’ve ever seen.” – Greenspan on @CNBC

As an empirical matter, of course, that’s rank nonsense – and is among the stupidest quips the Maestro has ever uttered. That’s because the law of supply and demand dictates that if the labor market is actually the tightest since Greenspan began his career in the 1950s, wage rates should also be rising at the highest rate ever.

In fact, at 2.8% year-year-over year for September 2018, nominal wage growth (red line) is the lowest it’s been since the late 1960s; and in real terms, the story is even worse.

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Robert Gore Said That? 10/10/18

On Septemeber 30, at Murphy, North Carolina, I addressed the Appalachian Network PATCON, a gathering of very bright people on the cutting edge of preparation for the coming catastrophe. The topic was: “How to Survive an Economic Collapse.”

And the Q & A: