Black Appraisals of Black Lives Matter – Part II, by Soeren Kern (with link to Part I)

Perhaps the most egregious denigration of blacks in America today comes from those who think that blacks are a monolith, and only think one way, particularly about matters of race. Many blacks are quite skeptical of and even hostile to Black Lives Matter and its agenda. From Soeren Kern at gatestoneinstitute.org:

  • “BLM are basically, in my opinion, profiteers. They are profiting on trying to give a narrative, a false narrative, that is: ‘white racist cops are destroying the black community.’ No BLM presence walking through Chicago protesting black-on-black crime. You know why? Because it is not profitable. There is no money to be made.” — Leo Terrell, civil rights attorney and lifelong Democrat.
  • “Black Lives Matter does not support the critical civil rights issue of this day… educational freedom. How many young black kids are relegated to failing public schools in failing neighborhoods? Where does BLM stand on that issue? They stand with the progressive socialist left and the teachers unions. Ask yourself, has BLM ever condemned the action of Barack Obama in April 2009 to cancel the DC school voucher program?” — Allen West, former U.S. Congressman for Florida and retired U.S. Army lieutenant colonel.
  • “The dubious goal of the politics of racial grievance exploited by BLM and others is to finance their causes. Thus, in order to advance their agendas, they have to come up with a negative narrative regardless of its veracity. The story must pull on the heartstrings of blacks to ensure solidarity and of whites to keep them feeling guilty and compliant. Hence, the false narrative that ‘Blacks are being gunned down by white cops’ excites those who have been conditioned to accept the claim regardless of its factual accuracy.” — Dr. Eric Wallace, President of the Freedom’s Journal Institute for the Study of Faith and Public Policy.
  • “We now find ourselves in a place that I feel is the antithesis of the Civil Rights Movement. Instead of marching toward a world that deemphasizes the importance of skin color, we instead find ourselves pursuing a world where skin color is placed firmly and proudly at the forefront of identity, where Martin Luther King’s idea of judging people by the content of their character takes a decided backseat to a person’s ancestry…. a world where white people must apologize and atone for sins that they never committed and black people claim victimhood for horrors that they never experienced…. It is the exact thing the Civil Rights Movement aimed to defeat. — Leonydus Johnson, actor.
  • “Racism as a factor has never been more insignificant in American life…. you know who knows that? Barack Obama. Because when Barack Obama gives a commencement address at Howard University, he says that if you could be born at any time, anywhere, he said that it would be here and now. And this is a guy whose last name is Obama, born in Hawaii, middle name Hussein, knocks off Hillary Clinton and beats John McCain. And he believes racism is a major problem in America? Nonsense….” — Larry Elder, radio talk show host and bestselling author.
  • “The most important thing is helping people realize to how important their own attitudes are. I would argue that a person’s attitudes are more important than race, gender, social class in determining whether or not they are going to be successful.” — Dr. Carol M. Swain, former professor of political science and law at Vanderbilt University.
“Black Lives Matter does not support the critical civil rights issue of this day… educational freedom. How many young black kids are relegated to failing public schools in failing neighborhoods? Where does BLM stand on that issue? They stand with the progressive socialist left and the teachers unions.” — Allen West, former U.S. Congressman for Florida and retired U.S. Army lieutenant colonel. (Photo by Kevin Hagen/Getty Images)

This multi-part series (Part I here) focuses on the perspectives of blacks — conservative, liberal or libertarian — who appraise Black Lives Matter and its agenda. The following selection of commentary by blacks from all walks of life — actors, athletes, businesspeople, civil rights activists, clergy, commentators, physicians and politicians — demonstrates that black public opinion is not monolithic, and that BLM does not speak for all African Americans.

Continue reading→

 

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