Another Brick in the Great Wall of Coolangatta, by Simon Black

People always think “they” would never do that or that it will never get that bad. But they do do that and it does get that bad. From Simon Black at sovereignman.com:

Ursula Bach was 18 years old… and six months pregnant… when she heard the news.

It was August 13, 1961. And East Germany’s government started building a wall to separate East Berlin from West.

Moreover, tens of thousands of East German troops had been deployed overnight to suppress protests and erect makeshift barricades to prevent people from leaving.

Ursula Bach had crossed the border back in May, rightaroundthe time that East Germany’s leader quipped, “Nobody has the intention of building a wall…”

And then it happened. Her world changed overnight.

Ursula’s fiance Fried (the father of their child) was still in East Berlin. And she knew that she would never see him again.

Their son Andreas was 28 years old before the wall came down; he grew up never knowing his father, even though Fried technically only lived a few blocks away. But he might as well have been on Mars.

There are countless other stories like this from the days of the Berlin Wall– families torn apart and separated for decades.

Obviously what’s happening today is nowhere near as heinous as the Berlin Wall. But it’s difficult to ignore the whispers of history.

Australia is a unique example, with some of the most severe Covid protocols on the planet.

The entire state of New South Wales (population: 7.4 million) was locked down a few weeks ago because 4 people died of Covid.

In the neighboring state of Victoria, Emperor Dan Andrews announced yet another lockdown on August 21. It was originally supposed to end on September 2, but the Emperor has predictably extended the lockdown for several more weeks.

Some Australians are starting to realize the truth– even when certain restrictions are eased, they’re never quite ‘out’ of lockdown; they’re merely ‘in between’ lockdowns.

The most notable example, however, may be the border between the states of Queensland and New South Wales.

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One response to “Another Brick in the Great Wall of Coolangatta, by Simon Black

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