Tag Archives: Brain Drain

Get ready for the brain drain from US healthcare, by Simon Black

Medicine as a line of work grows increasingly unpalatable from a financial, quality of work, intrinsic rewards, and moral perspective. From Simon Black at sovereignman.com:

Between 1956 and 1960, 600 doctors annually emigrated from the UK to find employment in the US, Australia, New Zealand, and other countries.

At the time, the UK was graduating about 1,800 doctors annually— meaning about a third of new doctors were leaving the county.

A 1962 paper published in the British Medical Journal tried to explain this trend:

“A possible explanation of the phenomenon is that practice in the National Health Service is relatively unattractive to young doctors economically, professionally, and idealistically.”

The number of British doctors leaving to practice abroad increased sharply in 1946, after the UK implemented its socialized healthcare system.

Even today the UK is still dealing with overworked and underpaid doctors who quit the NHS to find greener pastures abroad.

In fact a 2016 survey from the British Medical Association found that 90% of junior doctors would be willing to quit over a pay dispute with the government.

To fill the gap, the UK relies on foreign-born doctors. Over 28% of NHS doctors are not of British nationality. But even still the system is short-staffed by about 100,000 positions.

Because of these failures, as of April, about 4.7 million patients in the UK were sitting on wait-lists until the NHS can get around to treating them.

Now the US is trying to one-up the UK by engineering an even bigger shortage of healthcare professionals.

New York’s governor has already declared a State of Emergency due to hospital worker shortages, because tens of thousands were fired for refusing to take the [unmentionable word that starts with a ‘V’].

One hospital had to stop delivering babies because they lost too many healthcare workers in their maternity ward.

Now that Hunter Biden’s dad has issued a national order, this problem is only going to intensify.

Healthcare professionals who choose to make their own personal health decisions— the same people who were celebrated last year a front-line heroes— are now being fired or forced to resign because of this mandate.

That’s bad enough.

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The Brain Drain, by Jeff Thomas

The best and the brightest are always the first to read the writing on the wall and are always the first to flee. From Jeff Thomas at internationalman.com:

In 1933, Albert Einstein renounced his German citizenship soon after Adolf Hitler became Chancellor. Although that left him without a legal home, he was welcomed in England and later, the US, and eventually became a US citizen in 1935.

This was quite a risky move at the time, as he had no certainty of a better life outside of Germany, or even a prospective job. But he saw the writing on the wall. As a man of reason, he focused not on the present condition in Germany, but where events would ultimately lead. His focus was on the Germany of the future and he made a difficult call that those with less vision might not have made.

In 1940, Ludwig von Mises was perhaps the most gifted economist in Austria, as well as being a visionary of libertarian thinking. But he left Austria in that year. The Nazi expansion was already under way and he understood that, if anything, he was leaving late in the game, but before it became impossible to leave. On that day, Austria lost one of its best minds.

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