Tag Archives: Sedition

The Domestic Terrorism Act Boils Down to State Prosecution of White People for False Sedition, by Gary D. Barnett

The proposed legislation moves us one step closer to where any criticism of the government or its narratives, as conveyed by its captured press, will be illegal. From Gary D. Barnett at lewrockwell.com:

“There is no crueler tyranny than that which is perpetuated under the shield of law and in the name of justice.”

~ Baron de Montesquieu

A very horrendous bill was introduced recently in Congress called the “Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act of 2021.” The irony of this bill title is that it is not about preventing terrorism; it is about legalizing terrorism by the state against the citizenry. It would be more appropriately titled the U.S. Government Terrorism Authorization Act of 2021.

The motivating factor for this atrocity was said to be the recent purposely staged and intentionally allowed false-flag coup at the Capitol on January 6th. The entire situation was planned in advance to assure that Biden would be the ‘selected’ president, while the members of Congress could pretend to be fearful for their lives. The police led both legitimate and criminal protesters inside the Capitol building, allowed them to remain there, all while doing nothing but brutally murdering one innocent woman. The cowardly Congress was shuttled into safe places to hide until enough pictures and video could be taken, and enough facial recognition could be gathered so that the desired Trump supporters could be gathered up and jailed while others would walk free. This was the plot and now the scene is set. The feigned ‘indignant’ Congress got everything they wanted out of this directed production.

Continue reading→

Sedition Charges Are Almost Always a Terrible Idea, by J.D. Tucille

Weak governments throw people into jail for saying things the government doesn’t like. From J.D. Tuccille at reason.com:

In the wake of the January 6 storming of the Capitol, a popular new word in common usage is “sedition.” Horrified onlookersand conniving power brokersurge charging the participants and those who egged them on with “seditious conspiracy” under laws with a nasty history of politicized mischief. As such, “sedition” joins the recently popular “treason” on the list of overused and emotionally charged vocabulary terms with dangerous implications.

“For at least some of these protesters, particularly the ones that broke into the Capitol, I think there’s an extraordinarily strong case that they used force to delay, to hinder, the execution of our laws governing the election and how electoral votes are counted,” Professor Devin Schindler of Western Michigan University’s Cooley Law School told the Detroit Free Press. “It seems fairly clear to me, based on what we’re seeing, that folks are in fact, almost textbook violating this seditious conspiracy statute by using force to interfere with lawful government activity.”

In his analysis, Schindler echoed earlier comments by former Attorney General William Barr. According to the Wall Street Journal, Barr “told the nation’s federal prosecutors to be aggressive when charging violent demonstrators with crimes, including potentially prosecuting them for plotting to overthrow the U.S. government… He encouraged the prosecutors to seek a number federal charges, including under a rarely used sedition law, even when state charges could apply, the people said.”

Continue reading→

ASSANGE EXTRADITION: Espionage is the Charge, But He’s Really Accused of Sedition, by Joe Lauria

Governments have long used sedition laws to go after their critics. From Joe Lauria at consortiumnews.com:

The U.S. is trying to extradite Julian Assange to stand trial for espionage, but even though sedition is no longer on the books, that’s what the U.S. is really charging him with, says Joe Lauria.

The United States has had two sedition laws in its history. Both were repealed within three years. Britain repealed its 17th Century sedition law in 2009. Though this crime is no longer on the books, the crime of sedition is really what both governments are accusing Julian Assange of.

The campaign of smears, the weakness of the case and the language of his indictment proves it.

The imprisoned WikiLeaks publisher has been indicted on 17 counts of espionage under the 1917 U.S. Espionage Act on a technicality: the unauthorized possession and dissemination of classified material—something that has been performed by countless journalists and publishers over the decades. It conflicts head on with the First Amendment.

But espionage isn’t really what the government is after. Assange did not pass state secrets to an enemy of the United States, as in a classic espionage case, but rather to the public, which the government might well consider the enemy.

Deep Roots

Assange revealed crimes and corruption by the state. Punishing such legitimate criticism of government as sedition has deep roots in British and American history.

Tybun Tree, place of execution near where Marble Arch now stands in London.

Sedition was seen in the Elizabethan era as the “notion of inciting by words or writings disaffection towards the state or constituted authority.” Punishment included beheading and dismemberment.

Continue reading→