Category Archives: Insurrection

As Hong Kong refuses to bend the knee… by Simon Black

China will wait the Hong Kong situation out. From Simon Black at sovereignman.com:

Sun Tzu, the legendary Chinese general of the 6th century BC Zhou Dynasty, famously wrote in the Art of War:

“When you engage in actual fighting, if victory is long in coming, then men’s weapons will grow dull and their ardor will be damped. If you lay siege to a town, you will exhaust your strength.”

Modern day governments understand this principle very well. And that’s lesson #1 I want to discuss today.

If you’ve turned on a television, seen a newspaper, or casually browsed the Internet today, you probably saw some startling news about more protests erupting in Hong Kong.

I told you about this earlier in the week when I was on the ground there– over a million people took to the streets to demonstrate against a Draconian new law that the Hong Kong government is proposing which aims to make it easier to extradite political dissidents to mainland China.

People in Hong Kong are militant about their freedom, and they’re refusing to bend the knee over this proposed law.

Yet the government is still pressing ahead despite overwhelming opposition. So much for representative democracy.

Other governments around the world have spoken out about it, including even the United States, which issued a statement expressing “grave concern” about the law.

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EU Establishment Set for Popular Rebuke in Elections, by Strategic Culture

They can blame it on the Russians all they want, but the powers that be in Europe are actually losing power because they’re out of step with most Europeans. From the editorial board at Strategic Culture at strategic-culture.org:

Over this weekend 28 member states of the European Union go to the polls in an impressive exercise of democracy. Polling takes place over four days, ending on Sunday. The full results won’t be finalized until next week. But already it is widely anticipated that so-called populist parties across the bloc will make significant gains in winning seats in the 751-member chamber of the European Parliament.

One glaring anomaly is that Britain is participating in these elections, even though, in theory, it was supposed to have departed the EU in March. The Brexit wrangling has persisted without a clear result, meaning that the United Kingdom is obliged to hold EU parliamentary elections like the other 27 member states. European parliamentarians elected in Britain may not actually take their seats in Brussels or Strasburg because the Brexit process when complete – whenever that happens – will make their seats redundant.

Another anomaly is that the 2019 elections have been overshadowed with political and media claims in the run-up to the polls that Russia would launch an “interference campaign” to sway voters to vote for political parties opposed to the EU status quo.

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UK deep state plots to thwart Brexit, by George Callaghan

If Brexit goes through, ordinary British people may get the idea that they, rather than the Deep State, should be deciding how they’re governed. By George Callaghan at theduran.com:

  • In 2016 the British people voted for independence. This was despite the despicable threats of the EU elite

Decades ago the British deep state hatched a nefarious plot against the British people.  The elite wanted to foist European unity on an unwilling populace. The notion of the conceited Whitehall elite was that the peasants were stupid and the mandarins knew best. In late 1940s the United Kingdom politely declined offers to join the proposed European Coal and Steel Community. This was an embryonic European Economic Community. As Churchill said ‘we are with Europe but not of it.’ One Labour MP sagely said of joining the European project ‘the Durham miners won’t wear it.’ Those were the days when MPs quaintly cared about serving their constituents.

Harold Macmillan sought British accession to the European Economic Community. The French President de Gaulle rightly rejected the British application. De Gaulle was doing the British a favour. He correctly surmised that the United Kingdom would never be fulling committed to the EEC and that the bulk of the British people were adamantly opposed to such a venture. Charles de Gaulle was a visionary perhaps 70 years ahead of his time. He said that if the UK were admitted it would be forever sticking its oar in. These were prophetic words!

In the late 60s Harold Wilson’s Labour Government sought British membership of the EEC and was again rebuffed. In the early 1970s Edward Heath’s Conservative Government applied to the EEC for a third time. On this occasion Heath’s efforts were crowned with success. It only succeeded through subterfuge of the grossest character. Heath was warned by civil servants that the United Kingdom would have to sublimate itself to European sovereignty. Nevertheless Heath would not let the truth get in the way of his vaulting ambition. He released an official statement that ‘this involves no loss of essential national sovereignty’. Edward Heath did that in full knowledge of this being an outrageous falsehood. The public were assured that the idea there would one day be a single currency was a preposterous scare mongering tactic. In 2002 Heath was asked whether in the early 1970s he had envisaged the UK joining a single  European currency. ‘Yes, of course’ he chortled.

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How Farage’s Brexit Party Is Destroying The UK Political Establishment, by Tyler Durden

The destruction of the UK political establishment is devoutly to be desired. From Tyler Durden at zerohedge.com

Since Nigel Farage officially launched the ‘Brexit Party’ six weeks during a coming-out party in Coventry, Farage and his allies have ridden widespread frustration with a seemingly ineffectual British political establishment to the top of the polls, attracting waves of defectors from the Tories and Labour.

Farage

The most recent polls – taken just days before the vote, which, for the UK, will take place on Thursday – show the Brexit Party is up by double-digits over its nearest rival, the Liberal Democrats. Meanwhile, support for Labour and the Tories has dwindled to single-digit levels.

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Farage & Gabbard — Lions of the Great Realignment, by Tom Luongo

Nigel Farage and Tulsi Gabbard are emerging as leaders of a movement trying to  wrest control o their own lives away from governments. From Tom Luongo at tomluongo.me:

There is a realignment coming in electoral politics. It began with Ron Paul in 2008 and has been building for more than a decade. We know this story well.

That realignment will be about restoring not just national sovereignty but also personal autonomy in a world the rulers of which are desperate to clamp down their control over.

The thing is I don’t think we’ve quite come to terms with the rapidity with which change comes. It builds slowly, simmering below the surface and then one day just explodes into a maelstrom of chaos.

This is where things stand in Britain with the betrayal of Brexit. It is also where things stand with Trump’s daily betrayal of his pledge to end the needless wars and regime change operations.

Tulsi Gabbard will collect a lot of voters sick to death of our foreign policy destroying the lives of millions, draining our spirit and emptying our pockets.

You can see it happening, slowly… and then all at once.

The signs of the chaos as we approach next week’s European Parliamentary elections were there if we were willing to look closely. More often than not, our being distracted or, worse, our normalcy bias keeps us ignorant of what’s happening.

Raising goats I’ve unfortunately witnessed this first hand and in a devastating way. Their entire digestive tracts are simply big fermentation vessels, chocked full of different bacteria working on what they’ve eaten.

When they’re healthy, it’s all good. The good bacteria digests the food, they absorb it and they are vibrant, alert and annoying.

But, if one of those other bacteria begin to get out of control, they can go from healthy to frothing at the mouth and dying overnight.

The goat is the Taoist symbol for ‘strong on the outside, fragile on the inside.’

Our political system is definitely a goat at this point.

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The Bear’s Lair: The Brexit War is entering its Western Front phase, by Martin Hutchinson

A good article that handicaps the various possible Brexit outcomes. From Martin Hutchinson at tbwns.com:

As this column forecast four weeks ago, Treason in the Brexit process prospered, and Brexit has been postponed to October 31. Businesses groaned, as the uncertainty prolonged itself to an unendurable length. Most likely, Brexit will now either be abandoned or diluted to a degree where Britain does not break free of the EU’s regulatory straitjacket. However, the battle is not yet over, so I thought it sensible to use this Easter respite to offer some thoughts on how to maximize the chance of a genuine return to a free Britain.

Andrew Roberts, in a splendid recent Wall Street journal op-ed, pointed out that George Washington would not have given up his dream of American independence because of a mere 3% potential loss in GDP (if at that time they had possessed the concept or the ability to measure it). That heavily understates the case. The true loss in per capita GDP (i.e. living standards) from American independence was about 15-20%. In 1776, the American colonists had the highest living standards in the world (and among the lowest taxes, which makes one wonder why the silly people wanted independence at all – oops, sorry, that’s Hate Speech!)

By 1790, U.S. living standards were considerably lower, and well below those in the mother country. Profitable trade patterns had been disrupted – the Boston smugglers found it very difficult to make a (moderately) honest living when there were no longer any legitimate British suppliers to undercut. Furthermore, American government under the Articles of Confederation was a shambles with no control over tariffs imposed state by state – so the United States suffered the same loss of income from 1776 to 1790 as did the countries of former Austria-Hungary after 1918. Meanwhile from the end of 1783 Britain enjoyed an exceptionally competent free-trading, free-market government under the Younger Pitt, and was thus by 1790 considerably richer than its ex-colonies.

Thereafter, the Napoleonic Wars boosted U.S. wealth (neutrality was profitable) and depressed British wealth, so that by 1815 the U.S. was again wealthier than Britain, on a per capita basis. However, after 1815 rapid U.S. immigration, foolish economic policy (we’re looking at YOU, Andrew Jackson) and the Civil War once more caused U.S. living standards to lag those of the peaceful rapidly industrializing Britain. Only after 1870, as Britain began to suffer severely from its unilateral free trade policy, did the United States pull decisively ahead.

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D Is for a Dictatorship Disguised as a Democracy, by John W. Whitehead

Here are the ABCs of tyranny, from John W. Whitehead at rutherford.org:

“When a population becomes distracted by trivia, when cultural life is redefined as a perpetual round of entertainments, when serious public conversation becomes a form of baby-talk, when, in short, a people become an audience and their public business a vaudeville act, then a nation finds itself at risk; a culture-death is a clear possibility.” — Professor Neil Postman, Amusing Ourselves to Death: Discourse in the Age of Show Business

What characterizes American government today is not so much dysfunctional politics as it is ruthlessly contrived governance carried out behind the entertaining, distracting and disingenuous curtain of political theater. And what political theater it is, diabolically Shakespearean at times, full of sound and fury, yet in the end, signifying nothing.

Played out on the national stage and eagerly broadcast to a captive audience by media sponsors, this farcical exercise in political theater can, at times, seem riveting, life-changing and suspenseful, even for those who know better.

Week after week, the script changes (Donald Trump’s Tweets, Congress’ hearings on Robert Mueller’s Russia probe, the military’s endless war drums, the ever-widening field of candidates for the 2020 presidential race, etc.) with each new script following on the heels of the last, never any let-up, never any relief from the constant melodrama.

The players come and go, the protagonists and antagonists trade places, and the audience members are quick to forget past mistakes and move on to the next spectacle.

All the while, a different kind of drama is unfolding in the dark backstage, hidden from view by the heavy curtain, the elaborate stage sets, colored lights and parading actors.

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