Tag Archives: Winston Churchill

He Said That? 11/7/18

From Winston Churchill (1874–1965), British politician, army officer, and writer, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955:

Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.

Advertisements

He Said That? 7/13/18

From Winston Churchill (1874–1965), British politician, army officer, and writer, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955

Diplomacy is the art of telling people to go to hell in such a way that they ask for directions.

He Said That? 6/9/17

From Winston Churchill (1874–1965), British politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955:

Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing ever happened.

He Said That? 12/20/16

From Winston Churchill (1874-1965), British politician and statesman, best known for his leadership of the United Kingdom during World War II,  Prime Minister of the UK from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955, letter to his wife Clemmie, during the build up to World War I:

Everything tends towards catastrophe and collapse. I am interested, geared up and happy. Is it not horrible to be made like this.

The answer is yes. See Rethinking Churchill.

Rethinking Churchill, by Ralph Raico

This is a long but very interesting article about the “real” Winston Churchill. From Ralph Raico at lewrockwell.com:

[This essay originally appears in The Costs of War: America’s Pyrrhic Victories, edited with an introduction by John V. Denson.]

Churchill as Icon

When, in a very few years, the pundits start to pontificate on the great question: “Who was the Man of the Century?” there is little doubt that they will reach virtually instant consensus. Inevitably, the answer will be: Winston Churchill. Indeed, Professor Harry Jaffa has already informed us that Churchill was not only the Man of the Twentieth Century, but the Man of Many Centuries.[1]

In a way, Churchill as Man of the Century will be appropriate. This has been the century of the State — of the rise and hypertrophic growth of the welfare-warfare state — and Churchill was from first to last a Man of the State, of the welfare state and of the warfare state. War, of course, was his lifelong passion; and, as an admiring historian has written: “Among his other claims to fame, Winston Churchill ranks as one of the founders of the welfare state.”[2] Thus, while Churchill never had a principle he did not in the end betray,[3] this does not mean that there was no slant to his actions, no systematic bias. There was, and that bias was towards lowering the barriers to state power.

To gain any understanding of Churchill, we must go beyond the heroic images propagated for over half a century. The conventional picture of Churchill, especially of his role in World War II, was first of all the work of Churchill himself, through the distorted histories he composed and rushed into print as soon as the war was over.[4] In more recent decades, the Churchill legend has been adopted by an internationalist establishment for which it furnishes the perfect symbol and an inexhaustible vein of high-toned blather. Churchill has become, in Christopher Hitchens’s phrase, a “totem” of the American establishment, not only the scions of the New Deal, but the neo-conservative apparatus as well — politicians like Newt Gingrich and Dan Quayle, corporate “knights” and other denizens of the Reagan and Bush Cabinets, the editors and writers of the Wall Street Journal, and a legion of “conservative” columnists led by William Safire and William Buckley. Churchill was, as Hitchens writes, “the human bridge across which the transition was made” between a noninterventionist and a globalist America.[5] In the next century, it is not impossible that his bulldog likeness will feature in the logo of the New World Order.

To continue reading: Rethinking Churchill

He Said That? 4/11/16

From Winston Churchill 1874–1965) British politician and statesman, best known for his leadership of the United Kingdom during World War II. Prime Minister of the UK from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955, recipient of  the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1953:

We contend that for a nation to try to tax itself into prosperity is like a man standing in a bucket and trying to lift himself up by the handle.