Category Archives: Morality

LancetGate: “Scientific Corona Lies” and Big Pharma Corruption. Hydroxychloroquine versus Gilead’s Remdesivir, by Prof Michel Chossudovsky

Exhibit A in the corruption of science, from Michel Chossudovsky at lewrockwell.com:

Introduction

There is an ongoing battle to suppress Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), a cheap and effective drug for the treatment of Covid-19. The campaign against HCQ is carried out through slanderous political statements, media smears, not to mention an authoritative peer reviewed “evaluation”  published on May 22nd by The Lancet, which was based on fake figures and test trials.

The study was allegedly based on data analysis of 96,032 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 between Dec 20, 2019, and April 14, 2020 from 671 hospitals Worldwide. The database had been fabricated. The objective was to kill the Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) cure on behalf of Big Pharma.

While The Lancet article was retracted, the media casually blamed “a tiny US based company” named Surgisphere whose employees included “a sci-fi writer and an adult content model” for spreading “flawed data” (Guardian). This Chicago based outfit was accused of having misled both the WHO and national governments, inciting them to ban HCQ. None of those trial tests actually took place.

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Dystopian Societies Derive From Displaced Ethics and Values, by Doug “Uncola” Lynn

We are a society with very little logic or morality. From Doug “Uncola” Lynn at theburningplatform.com:

On April Fool’s Day of this year, I posted an article on how Coronavirus® has hastened the “old collectivism”.  That piece discussed Saul Alinsky’s tactics and how the current COVID hysteria is being manipulated by the Political Left.  My last post discussed how COVID-mania was successfully translated into Marxist hysteria following the death of George Floyd.

Certainly, America is under attack and what we are witnessing today serves as the mere preview for the main attraction that will commence on November 3, 2020 – if not before. The ongoing warfare is, of course, between those upholding the last remaining shreds of the U.S. Constitution against those who desire to raise the rainbow flag of globalism above the New World Order.

Whether history rhymes or repeats, it does so in cycles.  And nothing is new under the sun. Mankind’s desire to unite the world is said by some to have begun six millennia ago on the plains of Shinar, starting at the Tower of Babel.

In recent decades, especially, the birth pains of conflict were combined with the labor-inducing corollary of technological innovation and these have delivered new creations of collective centralization; to wit, the emergence of the League of Nations after World War I and the United Nations after World War II. And, surely, America’s current birth pains are about to deliver another new order.

‘The God That Failed’: Why the U.S. Cannot Now Re-Impose Its Civilisational Worldview, by Alastair Crooke

The US lacks the power to impose its vision on the world. From Alastair Crooke at strategic-culture.org:

It was always a paradox: John Stuart Mill, in his seminal (1859), On Liberty, never doubted that a universal civilisation, grounded in liberal values, was the eventual destination of all of humankind. He looked forward to an ‘Exact Science of Human Nature’, which would formulate laws of psychology and society as precise and universal as those of the physical sciences. Yet, not only did that science never emerge, in today’s world, such social ‘laws’ are taken as strictly (western) cultural constructs, rather than as laws or science.

So, not only was the claim to universal civilisation not supported by evidence, but the very idea of humans sharing a common destination (‘End of Times’) is nothing more than an apocalyptic remnant of Latin Christianity, and of one minor current in Judaism. Mill’s was always a matter of secularized religion – faith – rather than empiricism. A shared human ‘destination’ does not exist in Orthodox Christianity, Taoism or Buddhism. It could never therefore qualify as universal.

Liberal core tenets of individual autonomy, freedom, industry, free trade and commerce essentially reflected the triumph of the Protestant worldview in Europe’s 30-years’ civil war. It was not fully even a Christian view, but more a Protestant one.

This narrow, sectarian pillar was able to be projected into a universal project – only so long as it was underpinned by power. In Mill’s day, the civilisational claim served Europe’s need for colonial validation. Mill tacitly acknowledges this when he validates the clearing of the indigenous American populations for not having tamed the wilderness, nor made the land productive.

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The Preservation of Sanity And Civilization, by Paul Rosenberg

Humanity attains its best as individuals, not in groups. From Paul Rosenberg at freemansperspective.com:

I hadn’t planned on this post, but the ongoing mania compels me to contribute something toward the preservation of sanity and civilization. And so, here are some things to remember:

Humans are idolaters. Or at least most are when pressured. What we’re seeing now is an expression of idolatry and dogma. And bear in mind that the proudly anti-religious are often the most idolatrous and dogmatic.

Whenever people are getting whipped up for a cause – any cause – that’s the right time to step away. And if they start chanting, move away quickly. I’ll forgo the long explanation, but joining the pack slays reason, and for as long as you remain in the pack.

And this really is idolatry, because whatever we place above reason… whatever we place above open questioning… has become our god.

The crowd is always a deceiver. No one expressed this more concisely than Simone Weil, when she said, “conscience is deceived by the social.” Conscience is individual, social is collective, and the two are at odds. Likewise, sanity is individual and mania is collective.

Within the crowd, malice appears as duty, honor, order and justice. To reside in the crowd is to be deceived; the only question is how much.

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Soylent Green is people; COVID-19 is old people, by Jon Rappoport

Some of the things that have been done to old people during the coronavirus outbreak, like putting people diagnosed with Covid-19 back into nursing homes, amount to, at best, criminal negligence. From John Rappoport at nomorefakenews.com:

In the 1973 film, a NY police detective discovers the vastly overcrowded, poverty–stricken population of the city—who are being sustained on processed government food, called Soylent—are now eating humans who have died. That’s what Soylent Green is made of.

As I covered in my article (and spoke about) two days ago, open-source press reports reveal the “excess mortality” of 2020 is largely the result of elderly people dying in nursing homes.

This has nothing to do with a virus.

It has to do with patients who are ALREADY on a long downward health slide—then hit with the terror of an arbitrary and fake COVID-19 diagnosis, and then isolated and shut off from family and friends—in facilities where gross neglect and indifference are all too often the “standard of care.”

Death is the direct result.

The managers of pandemic information tell the big lie. They spin tales about “the virus” having a greater impact on the elderly.

No, the STORY about a virus has the impact. The terror has the deadly impact. The isolation has the deadly impact.

To an astounding extent, COVID-19 is a NURSING HOME DISASTER.

Mass murder by cruelty.

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Doctors for Assange Say UK May be Liable for His Torture, from Consortium News

The British and US governments want to kill Julian Assange as quickly as possible, without it looking like murder. From consortiumnews.com:

In a new letter to the British medical journal The Lancet, Doctors for Assange say that the British government may be held legally responsible for the torture of the imprisoned WikiLeaks publisher.

Here is the doctors’ statement followed by the letter to The Lancet and the doctors’ letter to the Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice Robert Buckland.

UK officials may be legally culpable in the torture of Julian Assange

Doctors have warned that UK officials could be held accountable for the torture of Julian Assange in an open letter published in The Lancet on International Day in Support of Victims of Torture.

The 216 undersigned physicians and psychologists from 33 countries have accused UK and U.S. government officials of intensifying Julian Assange’s psychological torture in spite of the world’s leading authorities on human rights and international law calling for his immediate release from prison.

Clinical Psychologist and Australian co-author of the publication, ‘The ongoing torture and medical neglect of Julian Assange’, Dr Lissa Johnson said the failure to properly treat Mr Assange may amount to an act of torture in which state officials, from parliament to court to prison, risk being judged complicit.

“Our letter is published just two days after the US Department of Justice announced a new superseding indictment against Assange representing yet another escalation in psychological torture tactics,” said Dr Johnson.

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This Way Lies Madness: The Summer of Hate Meets the Age of Intolerance, by John W. Whitehead

Don’t meet hate with hate. From John W. Whitehead at rutherford.org:

“Violence creates many more social problems than it solves…. If they succumb to the temptation of using violence in their struggle, unborn generations will be the recipients of a long and desolate night of bitterness, and our chief legacy to the future will be an endless reign of meaningless chaos. Violence isn’t the way.”—Martin Luther King Jr.

Marches, protests, boycotts, sit-ins: these are nonviolent tactics that work.

Looting, vandalism, the destruction of public property, intimidation tactics aimed at eliminating anything that might cause offense to the establishment: these tactics of mobs and bullies may work in the short term, but they will only give rise to greater injustices in the long term.

George Floyd’s death sparked the flame of outrage over racial injustice and police brutality, but political correctness is creating a raging inferno that threatens to engulf the nation.

In Boston, racial justice activists beheaded a statue of Christopher Columbus. Protesters in Richmond, Va., used ropes to topple that city’s Columbus statue, spray-painted it, set it on fire and tossed it into a lake. Columbus’ crimes against indigenous peoples throughout the Americas are well known.

In San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, protesters tore down a statue of Francis Scott Key, who penned “The Star-Spangled Banner.” Key was also a slaveholding lawyer who tried to prosecute abolitionists vocally opposing slavery.

Activists who object to Yale University being named after its founder Elihu Yale, a slave trader, are lobbying to re-name the school.

Students at Harvard University want to re-name Mather House, one of the dorms named after Increase Mather, the college president from 1685 to 1692 and a slave owner.

Administrators at Woodrow Wilson High School in Camden, N.J.—named after the nation’s 28th president, who guided the nation through World War I while upholding segregation policies—are now looking for a new name.

In an apparent bid to be more culturally sensitive, Land O’ Lakes has removed from its packaging the image of a Native American princess that had been featured on its products for a hundred years.

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The Evil of Militarism, by Bionic Mosquito

The more militaristic a society gets, the more cowardly. From Bionic Mosquito at lewrockwell.com:

The evil of militarism is that it shows most men to be tame and timid and excessively peaceable.

Heretics, Gilbert K. Chesterton (eBook)

I think we see this at the sporting events and parades, when the crowd roars its approval for the military fly-by, the color guard, the hero who just returned from combat.  The crowd roars because they are happy that they didn’t have to go.  “Let’s you and him have a fight.”

The professional soldier grows evermore courageous as the crowd grows timid – well, evermore courageous in the eyes of the crowd.  Maybe it is better said that as the crowd grows more timid, the professional soldier appears to be more courageous – it is all relative, not absolute.

his the Pretorian guard became more and more important in Rome as Rome became more and more luxurious and feeble.

Vietnam helped bring on the tremendous malaise of the 1970s, with high unemployment and high price inflation.  And the four years of Jimmy Carter, who – to my recollection – might have been the only president since Herbert Hoover to avoid initiating or extending any major military conflict.

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Epstein Case: Documentaries Won’t Touch Tales of Intel Ties, by Elizabeth Vos

Two new documentaries salaciously touch on the obvious scandal of Jeffrey Epstein’s life, but don’t touch the far more interesting subject of his ties to Israeli and US intelligence agencies. From Elizabeth Vost at consortiumnews.com:

Two new documentaries on the Jeffery Epstein affair delve into lurid details & give voice to his victims, but both scratch the surface of the political & intelligence dimensions of the scandal, writes Elizabeth Vos.

Investigation Discovery premiered  a three-hour special, “Who Killed Jeffrey Epstein?” on May 31, the first segment in a three-part series, that  focused on Epstein’s August 2019 death in federal custody. The series addresses Epstein’s alleged co-conspirator Ghislaine Maxwell, his links with billionaire Leslie Wexner, founder of the Victoria Secrets clothing line, and others, as well as the non-prosecution deal he was given.

The special followed on the heels of Netflix’s release of “Jeffrey Epstein: Filthy Rich,” a mini-series that draws on a book of the same name by James Patterson.

Promotional material for “Who Killed Jeffery Epstein?” promises that:  “… exclusive interviews and in-depth investigations reveal new clues about his seedy underworld, privileged life and controversial death. The three-hour special looks to answer the questions surrounding the death of this enigmatic figure.”  Netflix billed its series this way: “Stories from survivors fuel this docuseries examining how convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein used his wealth and power to carry out his abuses.”

Neither documentary however deals at all with Epstein’s suspected ties to the world of intelligence.

Absent from both are Maxwell’s reported links to Israeli intelligence through her father, Robert Maxwell, former owner of The New York Daily News and The Mirror newspaper in London. Maxwell essentially received a state funeral in Israel and was buried on the Mount of Olives after he mysteriously fell off his yacht in 1991 in the Atlantic Ocean.

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On toxic virtue and the new digital samizdat, by Mark E. Jeftovic

Now, more than ever, real virtue is its own and only reward, but faux virtue is a bludgeon. From Mark E. Jeftovic at guerrilla-capitalism.com:

Despite the nobility of the underlying cause, eras of mass statue-tipping sometimes portend excessive mob justice.

“Few trials have been more ludicrous both as regarded the charges and the kind of evidence admitted. Convictions and impressions were solemnly listened to, real arguments accorded no weight whatsoever.

Brissot interrupted a witness by declaring that he had never uttered any such calumnies against Paris as were imputed to him.

‘But did your ever deny those calumnies?’ asked the president of the tribunal, as if that settled the question.”

— Ernest F. Henderson, Symbol and Satire in the French Revolution, 1922

There’s never been a more dangerous time to take issue with the mob. I thought we’d hit peak outrage sometime in 2019 and that it would taper off from there. I actually thought that by the time I’d put out my book, Unassailable, in January that I had missed the crescendo. But then coronavirus hit, and deplatformings were back with a vengeance and by April I thought it had gotten so bad I decided to make my book available for free in order to help heterodox voices get their messages out.

But I was remiss in not anticipating how much cancel-culture would ramp back up ahead of the 2020 election, fuelled by widespread angst over the lockdowns and then detonated by the murder of George Floyd. All hell is breaking loose and while there are much needed reforms occurring rapidly, at least amongst policing (mandatory body cam recordings banning of choke holds, a Senate bill to end no-knock warrants, pressure to end Qualified Immunity, and if we’re lucky, a final abolition of civil asset forfeiture), there is also a vast ideological overshoot which somehow reminds me of an intellectual analog of The Terrors phase of the French Revolution.

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