Tag Archives: Zombies

Detect, Deter and Annihilate: How the Police State Will Deal with a Coronavirus Outbreak, by John W. Whitehead

When the zombie apocalypse comes, in the eyes of the government, you’ll be one of the zombies. From John W. Whitehead at rutherford.org:

“Fear is a primitive impulse, brainless as hunger, and because the aim of horror fiction is the production of the deepest kinds of fears, the genre tends to reinforce some remarkably uncivilized ideas about self-protection. In the current crop of zombie stories, the prevailing value for the beleaguered survivors is a sort of siege mentality, a vigilance so constant and unremitting that it’s indistinguishable from the purest paranoia.”— Terrence Rafferty, New York Times

What do zombies have to do with the U.S. government’s plans for dealing with a coronavirus outbreak?

Read on, and I’ll tell you.

The zombie narrative was popularized by the hit television series The Walking Dead, in which a small group of Americans attempt to survive in a zombie-ridden, post-apocalyptic world where they’re not only fighting off flesh-eating ghouls but cannibalistic humans.

For a while there, zombies could be found lurking around every corner: wreaking havoc at gun shows, battling corsets in movies such as Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, and running for their lives in 5K charity races.

Understandably, zombie fiction plays to our fears and paranoia, while allowing us to “envision how we and our own would thrive if everything went to hell and we lost all our societal supports.” Yet as journalist Syreeta McFadden points out, while dystopian stories used to reflect our anxieties, now they reflect our reality, mirroring how we as a nation view the world around us, how we as citizens view each other, and most of all how our government views us.

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Zombies R Us: ‘We the People’ Are the Walking Dead of the American Police State, by John W. Whitehead

The American people have become the zombies that populate their own worst nightmares, and many of their movies and TV series. From John W. Whitehead at rutherford.org:

RIP George Romero (1940-2017).

Romero—a filmmaker hailed as the architect of the zombie genre—is dead at the age of 77, but the zombified police state culture he railed against lives on.

Just take a look around you.

“We the people” have become the walking dead of the American police state.

We’re still plagued by the socio-political evils of cultural apathy, materialism, domestic militarism and racism that Romero depicted in his Night of the Living Dead trilogy.

Romero’s zombies have taken on a life of their own in pop culture.

Zombies also embody the government’s paranoia about the citizenry as potential threats that need to be monitored, tracked, surveilled, sequestered, deterred, vanquished and rendered impotent.

Case in point: in AMC’s hit television series The Walking Dead and the spinoff Fear the Walking Dead, it’s not just flesh-eating ghouls and cannibalistic humans that survivors have to worry about but the police state “tasked with protecting the vulnerable” that poses some of the gravest threats to the citizenry.

Why the fascination with zombies?

Perhaps it’s because zombie fiction provides us with a way to “envision how we and our own would thrive if everything went to hell and we lost all our societal supports.” As Time magazine reporter James Poniewozik phrases it, the “apocalyptic drama lets us face the end of the world once a week and live.”

In other words, zombies are the personification of our darkest fears.

Fear and paranoia have become hallmarks of the modern American experience, impacting how we as a nation view the world around us, how we as citizens view each other, and most of all how our government views us.

The propaganda of fear has been used quite effectively by those who want to gain control, and it is working on the American populace.

Despite the fact that we are 8 times more likely to be killed by a police officer than by a terrorist, we have handed over control of our lives to government officials who treat us as a means to an end—the source of money and power.

We have allowed ourselves to become fearful, controlled, pacified zombies.

 

To continue reading: Zombies R Us: ‘We the People’ Are the Walking Dead of the American Police State

Writing on the Wall——Again! by Bill Bonner

Bill Bonner with economics and civics lessons. From Boner at davidstockmanscontracorner.com:

Time to Sell… Maybe

BALTIMORE – Yesterday, the S&P 500 hit a new all-time high. And the Dow just hit a new record close as well. If you haven’t sold yet, dear reader, this may be one of the best times ever to do so.

 

We welcome new readers with a simple insight: Markets are contrary, pernicious, and downright untrustworthy. Just when the mob begins to bawl most loudly for stocks… the market sets its trap.

Longtime Diary sufferers will be quick to straighten out the record. We’ve warned that stocks have reached a peak several times over the last four years. Each time, we thought we saw the writing on the wall… and each time, we were mistaken. We raised our Crash Alert flag.

But the poor ol’ Black and Blue just fluttered in the wind, as stock prices rose ever higher. Eventually, it became so tattered, we took pity on it, folded it up, and put it away.

In the interest of full disclosure, as well as reputation hygiene, we saw a bear market coming in 1999 and 2007, too. We were right then. But lately, we’ve either been dead wrong… or dead early.

Since stocks, bonds, gold, bitcoin, works of art – literally anything that looks like an investable asset – are rising indiscriminately in price, our suspicion is growing that we nay be witnessing the early signs of a plunge in money’s purchasing power that is bound to eventually spread beyond the confines of markets for financial assets and collectibles. Just saying, one should perhaps not rule it out.

The Zombie – Crony Complex

Which just goes to show what a four-flusher Mr. Market can be. He (helped by the Fed’s EZ money policies and the Greenspan-Bernanke-Yellen “put”) has driven prices higher and higher – even as the global economy slows down.

And we’re not talking about a regular, unimportant slowdown. We’re talking about a slowdown of a special variety – one caused by deep trends that cannot be easily reversed.

For one, most of the major economies face a demographic challenge. They have more old people to support and fewer young people to support them. Then there’s the problem posed by the zombie-crony complex. New readers may not have heard of the ZCC, so we will explain.

“Zombie” is a generic term we use to describe people who live at other people’s expense. People who get food stamps, people who push papers for the government, people who collect “disability” or medical/pension benefits beyond what their contributions would justify – all are zombies.

In today’s world, there’s a zombie on every street corner.

As former Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney was famously overheard saying, almost half the population has been zombified. And as he discovered, there’s no point in trying to win a national election by running against zombies: They vote.

To continue reading; Writing on the Wall——Again!