Category Archives: Literature

Ban the Bard! By Theodore Dalrymple

The woke will ban everything except strict woke dogma. From Theodore Dylrymple at takimag.com:

Ban the Bard!

A creative writing course at a British university has withdrawn graduation requirement that students should attempt a sonnet, not on the reasonable grounds that it is futile to try to turn people with cloth ears for language into sonneteers, but because the sonnet is a literary form that is white and Western.

Indeed so: One has only to read a sonnet of Shakespeare to appreciate just how parochial and ethnocentric, but at the same time offensive to most of the world’s population, any sonnet by the “greatest” sonneteer in English is. I need take only one of the most famous as an example, Sonnet XVIII, which begins:

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?

Does Shakespeare (the ignoramus) not realize that there are equatorial and tropical parts of the world in which there is no summer, at most a wet and a dry season, and where the day and night are invariably more or less twelve hours long? Millions of people live in such regions, for whom the term “summer” can mean nothing. Of course, the people who live in such regions are predominantly those of color, to whom Shakespeare, with his typical Eurocentrism, was indifferent if not actually hostile. He simply didn’t care whether or not they understood him.

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The New Prison Camps, by Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr.

Modern academia inches ever closer to what Orwell had in mind. From Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr. at lewrockwell.com:

If you want to know what it’s like to live in a totalitarian dictatorship, you don’t have to look far. American colleges and universities, the so-called “institutions of higher learning”, have become the equivalent of Communist reeducation camps in which people are subjected to endless propaganda and compelled to mouth agreement with political slogans. If a teacher or student commits the slightest infraction of “woke” orthodoxy, he will be fired or suspended from his job or expelled from school, His rights do not matter. Students are also subjected to Covid tyranny even more than the general population.

Let’s look at some examples. For the past 75 years or so, Orwell’s 1984 has been the classic attack on totalitarianism. Now, at some universities Orwell’s book has been banned. Daniel Newton gives us the details: “As free speech is destroyed under the guise of ‘wokeism,’ one would agree there is no lack of irony in a recent report that a trigger warning was placed on Orwell’s novel due to ‘offensive and upsetting’ material.

The University of Northampton, UK, placed warnings on the grounds of ‘explicit material’ it claims is contained within the iconic book.

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While You Were Distracted by Will Smith, the International Elitists Met at The World Government Summit, by Derrick Broze

The globalists are never distracted; they keep pushing their plan to rule the world. From Derrick Broze at thelastamericanvagabond.com:

While much of the “mainstream” world has spent the last few days obsessing over and debating the celebrity spectacle surrounding American actor Will Smith slapping American comedian Chris Rock, the international elitists were meeting in Dubai for the 2022 World Government Summit.

From March 28th to the 30th, corporate media journalists, heads of state, and CEOs of some of the most profitable companies in the world met for discussions on shaping the direction of the next decade and beyond. Anyone with a functioning brain should ignore the tabloids and instead pay attention to this little known gathering of globalist Technocrats.

Let’s take a look at the speakers and the panels, starting with Mr. Great Reset himself, Klaus Schwab, founder of the World Economic Forum.

Schwab gave a talk entitled, Our World Today… Why Government Must Act Now?.  “Thank you, to his excellency for enabling this initiative to define a longer-term narrative to make the world more resilient more inclusive and more sustainable,” Schwab stated during his address. The use of the term narrative is important because in January 2021, Klaus and the World Economic Forum announced the next phase of The Great Reset, The Great Narrative.

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What Is a Miracle? By Dr. Naomi Wolfe

This is a beautiful, moving story. From Dr. Naomi Wolfe at lewrockwell.com:

Mushroom, our beloved and unbelievably elderly dog, finally passed away. There was a day when he simply pulled his snout back sharply at the offer of food, and from then on, his decline was rapid.

There was a day when I would come into the house and find him slouched like a little black and white parcel in unusual places such as the corners of the dining room, or else I’d see him oddly trying to stand behind the wood stove. There were days during which he lay in his bed, curled in a furry round circle as usual, but scarcely moving; the concern, practically the breath, of angels, was palpably over him.

Brian, my husband, made broths, and tried to feed him with a spoon. At last the spoon was refused, and we knew we did not have long with him.

We called two vets; both were compassionate, but brisk, and quick to suggest euthanasia. “There’s a vet service that comes to your house, very sensitively, to put your dog to sleep,” explained one veterinary assistant. “This woman is great — you will love her.”

“I don’t think I’ll love anyone who is coming over to euthanize my dog,” I blurted out.

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Exactly Which Dystopian Novel Are We Living In? By Tyler Durden

What’s your favorite dystopian novel or movie? Welcome to its real-life incarnation. From Tyler Durden at zerohedge.com:

There’s a debate going on among the disaffected/terrified over which dystopian novel we’re now living in.

As John Rubino remarks, some point to social media addiction and designer drugs to suggest Brave New World.

Others see mass surveillance and pandemic lockdowns as putting us squarely in 1984.

Still others cite online censorship and cancel culture as favoring Fahrenheit 451.

Each of these opinions seems valid, which is confusing.

A prisoner should know the shape of their cell. So it’s a relief to find out that someone (not sure who) has settled the argument by creating the following Venn diagram (Tweeted by our friend David Morgan).

Turns out we’re not in a single dystopian novel. We’re in all of them simultaneously.

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The War on Science and the 20th Century Descent of Man, by Cynthia Chung

Run, don’t walk, from those espousing their great ideas for improving humans, and then do everything possible to expose them for what they are: misanthropic killers. From Cynthia Chung at strategic-culture.org:

Huxley makes it crystal clear that he considers the world to be overpopulated, and that science and progress cannot be free to advance without limits.

In Part 1 the question was discussed what was Aldous’ real intention in writing the Brave New World; was it meant as an exhortation, an inevitable prophecy or as an Open Conspiracy? An Open Conspiracy closely linked to not only H.G. Wells, who clearly laid out such a vision in his book by the same title, published in 1928, but a vision also in the vein of Aldous’ famous grandfather Thomas Huxley “Darwin’s bulldog” and mentor to Wells.

It is from here that we will continue to discuss what exactly were Aldous’ views on such matters, did he in fact believe in the need for a scientific dictatorship? A scientific caste system? Was he actually warning the people that such a dystopia would occur if we did not correct our course or was it all part of a mass psychological conditioning for what was regarded as inevitable, and that Aldous’ role was rather to “soften the transition” as much as possible towards a “dictatorship without tears”?

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Who Will Be Brave in Huxley’s New World? By Cynthia Chung

Was Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World a prophetic warning or an instruction manual? From Cynthia Chung at strategic-culture.org:

No wonder that the Tavistock Institute and the CIA became involved in looking at the effects of LSD and how to influence and control the mind.

 “ ‘Science?’….’Yes,’ Mustapha Mond was saying, ‘that’s another item in the cost of stability. It isn’t only art that’s incompatible with happiness; it’s also science. Science is dangerous; we have to keep it most carefully chained and muzzled…I’m interested in truth, I like science. But truth’s a menace, science is a public danger. As dangerous as it’s been beneficent. It has given us the stablest equilibrium in history…But we can’t allow science to undo its own good work. That’s why we so carefully limit the scope of its researchers…We don’t allow it to deal with any but the most immediate problems of the moment. All other enquiries are most sedulously discouraged…Our Ford himself did a great deal to shift the emphasis from truth and beauty to comfort and happiness…[but] People still went on talking about truth and beauty as though they were the sovereign goods. Right up to the time of the Nine Years’ War. That made them change their tune all right. What’s the point of truth or beauty or knowledge when the anthrax bombs are popping all around you? That was when science first began to be controlled – after the Nine Years’ War. People were ready to have even their appetites controlled then. Anything for a quiet life. We’ve gone on controlling ever since. It hasn’t been very good for truth, of course. But it’s been very good for happiness. One can’t have something for nothing. Happiness has got to be paid for. You’re paying for it, Mr. Watson – paying because you happen to be too much interested in beauty. I was too much interested in truth; I paid too.’ “

Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World

Where does one start in discussing the famed fiction novel of Huxley? Although most agree that there is a definite brilliance to the piece, most are also confused as to what was Huxley’s intention in writing the extremely influential dystopic vision. Was it meant to be taken as an exhortation? An inevitable prophecy? Or rather…was it meant as an Open Conspiracy?

What do I mean by an Open Conspiracy?

If we are going to talk about such things our story starts with H.G. Wells, whom Aldous acknowledged he was most certainly influenced by, particularly by Wells’ novels “A Modern Utopia,” “The Sleeper Awakes,” and “Men Like Gods,” when writing his “Brave New World.”

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A Global Fiat Currency: “One Ring to Rule Them All”, by Thorsten Polleit

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One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne

In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.

One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,

One Ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them.

In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.

J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings

We’re fighting Sauron. From Thorsten Polleit at mises.org:

1.

Human history can be viewed from many angles. One of them is to see it as a struggle for power and domination, as a struggle for freedom and against oppression, as a struggle of good against evil.

That is how Karl Marx (1818–83) saw it, and Ludwig von Mises (1881–1973) judged similarly. Mises wrote:

The history of the West, from the age of the Greek Polis down to the present-day resistance to socialism, is essentially the history of the fight for liberty against the encroachments of the officeholders.1

But unlike Marx, Mises recognized that human history does not follow predetermined laws of societal development but ultimately depends on ideas that drive human action.

From Mises’s point of view, human history can be understood as a battle of good ideas against bad ideas.

Ideas are good if the actions they recommend bring results that are beneficial for everyone and lead the actors to their desired goals;

At the same time, good ideas are ethically justifiable, they apply to everyone, anytime and anywhere, and ensure that people who act upon them can survive.

On the other hand, bad ideas lead to actions that do not benefit everyone, that do not cause all actors to achieve their goals and/or are unethical.

Good ideas are, for example, people accepting “mine and yours”; or entering into exchange relationships with one another voluntarily. Bad ideas are coercion, deception, embezzlement, theft.

Evil ideas are very bad ideas, ideas through which whoever puts them into practice is consciously harming others. Evil ideas are, for example, physical attacks, murder, tyranny.

2.

With Lord of the Rings, J. J. R. Tolkien (1892–1973) wrote a literary monument about the epic battle between good and evil. His fantasy novel, published in 1954, was a worldwide success, not least because of the movie trilogy, released from 2001 to 2003.

What is Lord of the Rings about? In the First Age, the deeply evil Sauron—the demon, the hideous horror, the necromancer—had rings of power made by the elven forges.

Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky,

Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone,

Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die,

One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne

In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.

One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,

One Ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them.

In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.

But Sauron secretly forges an additional ring into which he pours all his darkness and cruelty, and this one ring, the master ring, rules all the other rings.

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The Importance of Dune: Part 1 – The Sleeper Has Awakened, by Tom Luongo

One of the main themes of Dune was the concentration of power, which is certainly relevant today. From Tom Luongo at tomluongo.me:

Last year I wrote two editorials for the Newsletter in sympathy with Denis Villeneuve’s film, Dune, originally suppose to come out last December. This one was published in the September 2020 issue when the election was the dominant issue of the day. The movie is now out but won’t come to the U.S. until next month and I think it appropriate to publish it now with everything happening in the world today. It’s been edited slightly to bring it up to date.


There are few things I’m more looking forward to than the first of two films by Denis Villeneuve bringing to life Frank Herbert’s classic science-fiction novel Dune.  And it isn’t just because I’m a big fan of the book, which is an intricately-plotted treatise on religion, gender, power and politics, but because its ideas are perfected suited for this period of history.

Because this story, unlike a lot of recent blockbuster films, should scare the pants off our political leaders as they will see themselves onscreen in their various guises.  And that fear may be enough to waken the sleeper, in the parlance of the book, the silent majority now staring at a bleak future post COVID-19.

In the hands of Denis Villeneuve, a film-maker perfectly suited to the material, we could be looking at a movie which becomes a turning point in the culture war.   Villeneuve is one of the few people working today who can marry bold visual storytelling with complex narrative while not browbeating his audience. Watch The Arrival, Sicario or, my favorite, Blade Runner 2049 (see my original thoughts/review here) to get a sense of what we’re in store for.

He reminds me of Ridley Scott at his best, which Scott hasn’t been at for decades.

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Change Is Coming to California – Recall Election or Not, by Allan Stevo

Change may come when the state becomes absolutely unlivable for everyone. From Allan Stevo at lewrockwell.com:

It is Recall Day, September 14, 2021, and ballots are everywhere, as freely as syringes on the streets of San Francisco.

People all over the state are showing up to vote and being told they have already voted.

Police in California pulled over a guy with a back seat full of blank recall ballots and drugs.

This will be the crookedest election since whatever election was the last one to take place in some third world banana republic.

There is only a year and some months left for whoever wins the recall, and that period in office may be significantly shortened by the inability to determine results any time soon.

One of the system’s plans is to lengthen the counting process considerably and leave Newsom in his seat.

Whoever wins the recall will have a massive government working against him or her to deal with. This will make change hard. Unless, of course, it is Newsom or a Democrat who wins, in which case government will work for them and no change will take place.

Nonetheless, Newsom is sweating. French Laundry, where he dined with lobbyists with no mask, is dragging him down. His son going to camp with no mask, is dragging him down. Rules for thee, but not for me, is dragging him down. The leader of his party, is even dragging him down, even during the honeymoon period of his time in the Oval Office.

The leader of the party is more popular than even Barack Obama, with the current leader of the party having received 81 million votes. The highest vote winner of any presidential candidate ever, somehow doesn’t have the polling numbers to support that theory. In some jurisdictions, he was so popular among the people that he even got more votes than there are voters. The narrative is falling apart.

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