Category Archives: Literature

Change Is Coming to California – Recall Election or Not, by Allan Stevo

Change may come when the state becomes absolutely unlivable for everyone. From Allan Stevo at lewrockwell.com:

It is Recall Day, September 14, 2021, and ballots are everywhere, as freely as syringes on the streets of San Francisco.

People all over the state are showing up to vote and being told they have already voted.

Police in California pulled over a guy with a back seat full of blank recall ballots and drugs.

This will be the crookedest election since whatever election was the last one to take place in some third world banana republic.

There is only a year and some months left for whoever wins the recall, and that period in office may be significantly shortened by the inability to determine results any time soon.

One of the system’s plans is to lengthen the counting process considerably and leave Newsom in his seat.

Whoever wins the recall will have a massive government working against him or her to deal with. This will make change hard. Unless, of course, it is Newsom or a Democrat who wins, in which case government will work for them and no change will take place.

Nonetheless, Newsom is sweating. French Laundry, where he dined with lobbyists with no mask, is dragging him down. His son going to camp with no mask, is dragging him down. Rules for thee, but not for me, is dragging him down. The leader of his party, is even dragging him down, even during the honeymoon period of his time in the Oval Office.

The leader of the party is more popular than even Barack Obama, with the current leader of the party having received 81 million votes. The highest vote winner of any presidential candidate ever, somehow doesn’t have the polling numbers to support that theory. In some jurisdictions, he was so popular among the people that he even got more votes than there are voters. The narrative is falling apart.

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Joe Biden is Recreating “The Camp of The Saints” at the US Border , by Revolver

In Camp of the Saints, politicians don’t have the courage to reject the demands of boatloads of immigrants seeking the unearned. Real life is following that script on the southern border of the US. From revolver.news:

Camp of the Saints is no longer fiction. The Biden administration has made it reality along the U.S.-Mexico border. Right before our eyes, the government of the United States is deciding that, in fact, the United States doesn’t really exist at all.

In Jean Raspail’s 1973 novel, a vast horde of starving Indians commandeers a flotilla of decrepit ships in the harbor of Calcutta. The flotilla sets sail for Europe, and slowly creeps around the Cape of Good Hope, past Sao Tome, through the Strait of Gibraltar, and finally descends upon southern France. As the fleet approaches, French society is first convulsed first by political infighting, then by panic, and finally by collapse.

Six months ago, Revolver listed Camp as one of eight books to read while you still can. We wrote then:

The thesis of The Camp of the Saints is simple: That the very traits that made the West so successful and so widely-imitated would eventually be its undoing. The West’s openness and egalitarianism led to widespread prosperity. But those same moral sensibilities, Raspail argues, mean that while the West could easily vanquish a normal military threat, it will be politically unable to justify its own success. If the impoverished, backwards masses of the Third World demand the wealth of the West, the West will submit even if it ultimately means the loss of its prosperity, its independence, its culture, its very existence. Nearly a half-century later, with Western elites eagerly waving in caravans from Central America and literal boatloads from Africa, Raspail’s foresight looks remarkable.

Six months ago, Raspail was prescient. Today, his vision is so accurate one wonders if he was a time traveler.

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Trying to Put All America Behind, by Edward Curtin

A literary and political reminiscence as truth and freedom disappear in America. From Edward Curtin at off-guardian.org:

Sixty years ago this summer, on August 7, 1961, President John Kennedy signed the bill creating The Cape Cod National Seashore in Massachusetts. It consists of forty miles of immaculate sandy beach, marshes, ponds, and upland along the Atlantic Ocean, with some portions stretching across the land to Cape Cod Bay in the west.

Henry Thoreau walked this wild Outer Atlantic Beach in 1849.  He said you can stand there and look out to sea and “put all America behind” you.

I am trying to do that as I stand looking at the waves breaking on a foggy early morning shore.  I am alone except for the hundreds of seals moaning on a sand bar and the gulls fishing in the tidal inlet at the far southern end of Coast Guard Light Beach.  A few laughing gulls swoop by as if to mock me with their laugh-like calls.

It is very hard to put the United States of America behind you when the fog of an endless propaganda war warps your mind and tries to crush your spirit even when you look away as far as the eye can see.

Across the ocean to the northeast, Mathew Arnold, on a far distant shore in England, wrote his famous poem “Dover Beach” at about the same time that Thoreau was walking where I stand.

Two very different men standing in different worlds, not just one at a window and the other in the blowing wind.

The former was an academically connected school inspector whose faith, vague as it was, was falling away as he described in “Dover Beach”: the turbulent ebb and flow of the breaking waves of faith that was being replaced by the sad withdrawing roar of melancholic human misery, devoid of love, light, joy, certitude, or help for pain.

It was the rhythmic sound of world-weariness and declining faith in the Old World.

The latter, a child of the New World, harsh critic though he was of the resigned lives of quiet desperation most people live, was still a man of deep if unorthodox faith in the divine, telling us that most people are determined not to live by faith if they can help it, as if anyone could live without faith in something, whether that something be God, skepticism, atheism, or the then-emerging new god of science.

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The Morlocks Milk Covid® for All Its Worth So That They Might Inherit the Earth, by Doug “Uncola” Lynn

Doug “Uncola” Lynn merges fiction and reality and does a masterful job of illustrating what’s going on. From Lynn at theburningplatform.com:

Where there is no vision, the people perish

– Proverbs 29:18

 

My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge

– Hosea 4:6

Just days ago I attended the funeral of an elderly person who was related to my wife. The week before the service, my bride had received a text informing us of the death. The message was a forwarded screenshot from someone who had angrily affirmed the deceased had received their second Covid vaccine injection just two weeks prior. The funeral was held in a country church located smack in the middle of rural nowhere; and, in a field next to the church’s adjacent cemetery, horses were grazing just yards away from the open grave.

After a traditional service featuring the old familiar hymns, and following the committal ceremony at the gravesite, a meal was served in the church basement.  As far as I knew that day, neither Covid nor the vaccines were mentioned in relation to the deceased. Instead, the service was a celebration of a Christian life; and with the joys and sorrows shared in poignant ways.

While walking through the cemetery after the internment, I saw a gravestone with the date of 1878, but the weathered stone was so worn I could not make out the departed’s name. I imagine the church must have been built around that date as well; and, like so many of the similar steepled structures in that area, they were constructed by immigrants who stamped the foundation stones and church bells with scripture verses written in their native language – mostly German, Swedish, Danish, and Dutch.

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Deontological Rivalry Pits East Against West, by Stephen Karganovic

In this rivalry, the betting favorite is the side that’s talking about truth, beauty, family, culture, and nation. from Stephen Karganovic at strategic-culture.org:

What is in progress is a clash between people and nations who support normal human values and the part of the Western elite which preaches post-human values

Russian historian and distinguished public intellectual Dr. Natalia Narochnitskaya was spot on in her Christmas homily delivered to cultural notables in Kaliningrad a few months ago when she said that “The world needs Russia precisely for being Russia, and therefore Russia must remain true to herself!”

“In our time,” she pointed out, “when beauty and adherence to norm are denounced as something vulgar and annoying, while sin and perversion are touted as symbols of sophistication, when all spiritual and historical sanctities of our people are being trampled underfoot, it is more vital than ever to avoid falling into perfidiously set traps. A huge role in this belongs to the Orthodox Church – the pillar and foundation of the Truth, but as well to all who are engaged in the fields of education and enlightenment.”

“Our mission,” Dr. Narochnitskaya continued, “is to pass our historical heritage on to future generations. Contemporary Russia, which is in the process of re-establishing its national and religious substance, is slated to become the world’s major powerhouse on the spiritual stage.”

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The Great Unvaxxed, by TE Creus

A story from the future that’s hopefully fiction. From TE Creus at off-guardian.org:

The vaccine was a resounding success. Yes, there had been a final death rate of 10% among the vaccinated, but this was mostly among the elderly or the already ill, so it was probably not the vaccine’s fault, and if it was, no one could prove it one way or another, and even if they could, well, the vaccine manufacturers were not liable to lawsuits due to the agreements they had made with the various governments.

In any case, the pandemic had ended, that was for sure.

Of course the masks and the lockdown mandates continued to be enforced; the reason was that while the pandemic had most certainly been defeated, the virus still existed in its natural form somewhere out there, and so it was vital to continue with the safety procedures to avoid any possible resurgence of the disease.

So what? People got used to it, as they had gotten used to so many other things before that. And was wearing a mask in the end much worse than wearing a helmet or a safety belt? Was being forced to stay at home for a few months every year much different than being forced to be at the office working for five days out of the seven in the week? Rules are rules, and those were not as bad as others that had been instituted in the past.

But there was something that worried the authorities. While most people had predictably complied with the mandatory vaccination campaign, there were a few groups that had refused them, alleging religious or health reasons, and found refuge in rural communities living off the grid. They had abandoned the use of mobile and network technology and so could not be traced so easily, and, since non-digital cash had been abolished, they appeared to have returned to a form of commerce based in the exchange of physical goods.

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The Great Donkification, by MN Gordon

If you don’t remember the donkeys in Pinocchio, here’s a refresher course. From MN Gordon at economicprism.com:

“Right here, boys!  Right here!  Get your cake, pie, dill pickles, and ice cream!  Eat all you can!  Be a glutton!  Stuff yourselves!  It’s all free, boys!  It’s all free!  Hurry, hurry, hurry, hurry!”
– Pleasure Island voiceover, Walt Disney’s Pinocchio (1940)

Welcome To Pleasure Island!

Did you get your stimmy check, yet?  If so, what are you going to do with it?

Are you going to park it in your savings account, pay down debt, and pay off a few bills?  Are you going to buy Chinese ‘stonks’, cryptocurrencies, and digital NFT art?

What about a new iPhone, fancy dinners, or a plane ticket to Cabo?  How about a new living room rug, a wood pellet grill, or a 75-inch flat screen TV with a sound bar?

The collective answer to these questions is the difference between deflation, asset price inflation, and consumer price inflation.

Billionaire folk hero Warren Buffett says you should use your stimmy check to “pay off credit card debt.”  His rationale is sound enough:

“If I owed any money at 18 percent, the first thing I’d do with any money I had would be to pay it off.  You can’t go through life borrowing money at those rates and be better off.”

Yet paying off credit card debt is the last thing Federal Reserve Chairman Jay Powell wants you to do with your stimmy check.  Because paying off debt is deflationary – it contracts the money supply.

Powell wants inflation of both consumer prices and asset prices.  He wants prices to rise, and the dollar to fall, so that long-term public and private debt burdens are slowly inflated away.  He also wants the stock market to maintain a permanently high plateau; the retirements of millions of Baby Boomers are banking on this.

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Attack of the Nihilists, by Kevin Barrett

Fyodor Dostoevsky turned out to be pretty darn prophetic. From Kevin Barrett at unz.com:

“’Are these the Nazis, Walter?’ ‘No, Donny, these men are nihilists, there’s nothing to be afraid of.’” -The Big Lebowski

Since the so-called insurrection of January 6, big media, big government, and big corporations have been demanding the collective scalp of the Trumpian alt-right. If we don’t somehow make those 70 million Trump voters disappear, the subtext goes, American democracy is doomed.

The alt-right agrees that American democracy faces an existential threat, but disagrees vociferously about the nature of the threat. Whereas Democrats and corporate media consider Trump’s cult of personality a fascist regime in the making, and his followers deluded and none-too-bright storm troopers, the deplorables, for their part, view the corporate Democrats as TDS-addled censorship-loving election thieves bent on establishing a “woke” dictatorship.

What does all this sound and fury really signify? What we are witnessing is a clash of barely-coherent yet increasingly frenetic ideologies—something the previous generation never imagined when it famously proclaimed the end of ideology. Its seems that Francis Fukuyama never read his Dostoevsky. If he had, he would have understood that the collapse of the grand récit of modernity would not lead to universal satisfaction under neoliberalism, but instead to ideological extremism, chaos, and bloodshed.

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Study Finds Book Burners Always Stop With Just A Few Fringe Books, So There’s Nothing To Worry About

From The Babylon Bee:

U.S.—A new study has confirmed that people who burn books always stop with just a few obscure, third-tier books with a couple of problematic things, and their book-burning activities never go beyond that, so there’s really nothing to worry about when books start getting burned.

The study covered book burnings carried out by governments and private groups throughout history. In every case, the researchers claim, book burners never went beyond their original targets. They couldn’t find even a single time that destroying a few books led to banning and destroying even more books. Therefore, they say, we’re totally in the clear when people start destroying Dr. Seuss books, because they’ll never move beyond those into more important things.

“Don’t worry, folks — they’ll definitely just stop with a couple of books,” said the head researcher of the study, Dr. Christopher Lyleson. “They usually find a couple of really problematic ones from decades ago and just stop there, their hunger to destroy information and opinions satiated. It’s really an important societal service, to occasionally purge the older works of one or two toxic books. But it always stops there, as far as we can tell.”

“So rest easy!”

Unfortunately, the study was found to be problematic and has been burned.

https://babylonbee.com/news/study-finds-book-burners-always-stop-with-just-a-few-fringe-books-so-theres-nothing-to-worry-about

No, We Don’t Need a ‘Reality-Czar’: Let Truth and Falsehood Grapple, by Gary M. Galles

John Milton, best known for his epic poem Paradise Lost, had some good things to say about truth and liberty. From Gary M. Galles at fee.org:

New York Times writer Kevin Roose recently surveyed “our truth-challenged information ecosystem” and found a proliferation of “hoaxes, lies and collective delusions.” As he put it, that limits the Biden administration’s ability to “unite a country,” because “millions of people have chosen to create their own version of reality.” In response, he called for the creation of a “reality czar”-led government task force to root out disinformation.

Roose admits such a call for a “truth commission” sounds “dystopian,” before proceeding to ignore many ways it would be exactly that. For instance, the Times, the Biden campaign, the Democrat leadership, and others on board with the idea have come nowhere close to pursuing “the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.” Yet despite a history of disseminating misinformation, clear biases, and suppression of those with different views, they would select the arbiters of Orwellian truth.

So who could be trusted as the reality czar? No one.

Just ask Democrats why they never suggested having one when Trump was in office. In politics, truth is subservient to power. But since any attempt to provably establish the truth would be littered with obstacles and controversies, and often beyond possibility, while creating a substantial threat to Americans’ freedoms, only someone who was indisputably committed to both truth and freedom could possibly be trusted to lead such an enterprise. And there are precious few who would qualify. If he wasn’t long dead, I would nominate John Milton.

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