Tag Archives: Child abuse

British ‘Justice’: Poppycock, by Bruce Bawer

The British government and media have ignored Muslim grooming gangs—groups who abduct and rape children—for decades. From Bruce Bawer at gatestoneinstitute.com:

  • Instead of arresting rapists, the police, in at least a couple of cases, actually arrested people who had done nothing other than to try to rescue their children from the clutches of rapists.
  • So much concern – legitimately so – about the sacred right of the rapists to a fair trial, including the presumption of innocence and an opportunity to retain the lawyers of their choice – but so much readiness to excuse the denial of the same right to Robinson.
  • These decades of cover-ups by British officials are themselves unspeakable crimes. How many of those who knew, but who did nothing, have faced anything remotely resembling justice? Apparently none.
  • As any viewer of British TV news knows, a “trained professional journalist” in Britain observes all kinds of rules of professional conduct: he calls Muslims “Asians,” he describes any critic of Islam, or anyone who attends a rally protesting the unjust incarceration of a critic of Islam, as a member of the “far right,” and he identifies far-left smear machines as “anti-racist groups.”

The coverage here during the last few days of the Tommy Robinson affair in Britain appears to be having at least a small impact in certain circles in Merrie Olde England. Dispatches have come in from some of the tonier addresses in the UK explaining, in that marvelous tone of condescension which no one from beyond the shores of England can ever quite pull off, that those of us who sympathize with Robinson have got it all wrong; that we simply do not grasp the exquisite nuances of British jurisprudence, specifically the kingdom’s laws about the coverage of trials – for if we did understand, we would recognize that Robinson’s summary arrest and imprisonment did not represent an outrageous denial of his freedom of speech, his right to due process, and his right to an attorney of his own choosing, but were, in fact, thoroughly appropriate actions intended to ensure the integrity of the trial he was covering. Those of us outside the UK who think that British freedom has been compromised and that the British system of law has been cynically exploited for ignoble purposes are, apparently, entirely mistaken; on the contrary, we are instructed, Britain’s police are continuing to conduct themselves in a responsible matter, Britain’s courts are still models of probity, and Britain’s real journalists (not clumsy, activist amateurs like Robinson) persist in carrying out their role with extraordinary professionalism and propriety, obeying to the letter the eminently sensible rules that govern reportage about court cases in the land of Magna Carta.

To continue reading: British ‘Justice’: Poppycock

The War on Tommy Robinson, by Stefan Molyneux

There are a lot of questions the British government is going to have to answer to establish that there is still some semblance of the rule of law in that country. From Stefan Molyneux at quadrant.org:

Explain why white men accused of pedophilia are allowed to be photographed and questioned by reporters on court steps, while Pakistani Muslims are not. Explain why a police force that took three decades to start dealing with Muslim rape gangs was able to arrest and incarcerate a journalist within a few scant hours. Explain why a man can be arrested for breaching the peace when no violence has taken place. To the British government: explain your actions, or open Tommy Robinson’s cell and let him walk free.

The rule of law is fragile, and relies on the self-restraint of the majority. In a just society, the majority obey the law because they believe it represents universal values – moral absolutes. They obey the law not for fear of punishment, but for fear of the self-contempt that comes from doing wrong.

As children, we are told that the law is objective, fair and moral. As we grow up, though, it becomes increasingly impossible to avoid the feeling that the actual law has little to do with the Platonic stories we were told as children. We begin to suspect that the law may in fact – or at least at times – be a coercive mechanism designed to protect the powerful, appease the aggressive, and bully the vulnerable.

The arrest of Tommy Robinson is a hammer-blow to the fragile base of people’s respect for British law. The reality that he could be grabbed off the street and thrown into a dangerous jail – in a matter of hours – is deeply shocking.

Tommy was under a suspended sentence for filming on courthouse property in the past. On May 25, 2018,  while live-streaming his thoughts about the sentencing of alleged Muslim child rapists, Tommy very consciously stayed away from the court steps, constantly used the word “alleged,” and checked with the police to ensure that he was not breaking the law.

Tommy yelled questions at the alleged criminals on their way into court – so what? How many times have you watched reporters shouting questions at people going in and out of courtrooms? You can find pictures of reporters pointing cameras and microphones at Rolf Harris and Gary Glitter, who were accused of similar crimes against children.

To continue reading: The War on Tommy Robinson

In Stunning Precedent, U.K. Drops Cases Against 20 Telford Groomers; Convicts Man For “Hate Speech” From A YouTube Video, by Jon Hall

Putting up a video of a dog making a Nazi salute is a crime in Great Britain, while pedophiliacs, child abusers, and child groomers go free. From Jon Hall at fmshooter.com:

A stunning claim reported by the Sunday Mirror revealed that Telford police have dropped more than 20 court cases against suspected child groomers – as the chief of police allegedly believes convicting all of the men would be “too much trouble”, according to a police source.

The Sunday Mirror, performing an 18-month investigation into the scandal, reveals an abhorrent and shocking lack of action from authorities:

  • Social workers knew of abuse in the 1990s but police took a decade to launch a probe
  • Council staff viewed abused and trafficked children as “prostitutes” instead of victims, according to previously unseen files
  • Authorities failed to keep details of abusers from Asian communities for fear of “racism”
  • Police failed to investigate one recent case five times until an MP intervened
  • One victim said cops tried to stop her finding out why her abusers had not been prosecuted because they feared she would talk to [The Mirror]

The Mirror also believes that as many as 1,000 children could have suffered at the hands of grooming gangs in Telford since the 1980s.

After the recent revelations of cover-up were exposed by The Mirror, the BBC – who had wholly ignored the potential scandal – ran a headline claiming that the number of victims had been “sensationalized“. In 2012, just 7 men were jailed in connection to child grooming in Telford. At the time, an estimated 100 girls were said to have been targeted by the gang between 2007 and 2009. However, spanning this abuse and inaction back to the 1980s – with 40 years of perpetration and inaction – the scope becomes much larger.

ABOVE: The 7 men arrested in 2012 in connection for child grooming in Telford.

Since the recent revelations, 12 more Telford sex abuse victims have come forward.

Notably, one of the victims claims that when she was picked up off the street, she was passed around by so many men that when she became pregnant at age 13 – she didn’t know who the father was. The conservative MP for Telford, Lucy Allan, has called for a comprehensive inquiry into the grooming scandal.

To continue reading: In Stunning Precedent, U.K. Drops Cases Against 20 Telford Groomers; Convicts Man For “Hate Speech” From A YouTube Video

Is Hollywood sitting on a pedophilia scandal?, by Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry

There have been rumors and allegations for years about Hollywood and pedophilia. It’s a rock few want to turn over. With the spotlight shining on Harvey Weinstein and other sexual predators, it’s also time to get to the bottom of pedophilia. From Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry at theweek.com:

The flurry of sexual harassment and assault allegations against Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein confirms an unsettling truth that deep down we already knew. There’s a reason “casting couch” has become a grotesquely ubiquitous term. We have long quietly assumed that big-time movie producers exploit their power to sexually exploit women. We should have heeded the warning signs. The smoke has been there for a long time. Of course the faint plumes were evidence of a fire raging, a fire we both did not imagine and yet knew was burning.

How could we have been so blind?

The answer to this question will also give you the answer to the next question: Can we seriously doubt that Hollywood is also turning a blind eye to a very real child sex-abuse scandal?

The evidence is there, just as it was in the cases of Bill Cosby or Harvey Weinstein. In 2011, former child star Corey Feldman warned that pedophilia in Hollywood was “the big secret” and “the number one problem.” Feldman alleged that he was abused and that his friend was raped on a movie set at the age of 11. But he didn’t just talk about instances of abuse. In a later interview, he described a system whereby young children were groomed by powerful older men who formed an organized network, with “publicists” providing cover. He would “love to name names,” but feared the legal risks, he said.

Precisely such an organized system for grooming and abusing children is described by a documentary; one molester described in the film pleaded no contest to two counts of child molestation, but the rest of the network has never been named, let alone investigated or charged. The title of the documentary? An Open Secret.

Former child star Elijah Wood made global headlines after saying in an interview last year that there was “something major” in Hollywood. “It was all organized,” he said. “There are a lot of vipers in this industry, people who only have their own interests in mind. There is darkness in the underbelly,” adding that Hollywood can “squash” the victims so that they “can’t speak as loudly as the people in power.” (He later issued a carefully worded clarification that he had no “firsthand experience or observation,” which still leaves room for being aware of an open secret.)

These stories fit a pattern, and not just the pattern common to all sex crimes allegations — the shame, the gas-lighting, the fear you won’t be believed — but also the pattern common to testimonies about a systemic problem: the coordination, the law of silence, the coverups.

And just as striking as these allegations is the deafening silence that surrounds them.

To continue reading: Is Hollywood sitting on a pedophilia scandal?