Tag Archives: Islamic immigration

Coming To A Town Near You: Expert Warns That No-Go Zones Are Growing In America, by Daniel Lang

Europe has a plethora of Islamic no-go zones in countries that have opened their arms to Muslims. It stands to reason that if the US does the same, we’ll get the same result. From Daniel Lang at shtfplan.com:

america-crumbling

Nothing epitomizes the failure of Europe’s immigration policies more than the notorious “no-go zones.”

For decades the West has opened its borders to people who don’t share their values, and the West has utterly failed to encourage these people to assimilate. To even suggest that is now considered racist in many European countries.

The lack of assimilation has reached a degree that many of these populations have become resentful of their mediocre status in society, and have actually become more insular. Younger generations of these immigrants are more likely to follow ideologies like radical Islam, and they’re less likely than their parents to interact with native born Europeans. Many of them don’t even speak any European languages.

The result has been the rise of dozens of no-go zones, which dot the urban landscapes of Europe. These are places that act as ethnic enclaves within their host countries. They are nations within nations, where outsiders are routinely shunned, berated, and beaten if they dare enter. In addition to that, they’ve become hotbeds of terrorism and civil unrest. And believe it or not, these Islamic no-go zones are beginning to show up in the United States.

That’s according to Raheem Kassam, a conservative political activist and author from the UK. He recently wrote a book on the subject of no-go zones, which reveals startling similarities between the Middle Eastern enclaves of Europe and America.

Places like the Cedar Riverside area of Minneapolis, where Shariah cops make house checks to make sure Somali refugees are not becoming too Westernized, and Hamtramck, Michigan, where the call to prayer is blasted over loudspeakers in Arabic and storefronts that once peddled Polish sausage are now brimming with halal meats.

These can be the early warning signs of a budding no-go zone, says Kassam. But even more crucial, he says, is the level of assimilation by second and third generation Muslim Americans. If the experience of Europe is any indication, trouble is on the horizon for U.S. cities.

To continue reading: Coming To A Town Near You: Expert Warns That No-Go Zones Are Growing In America

Advertisements

Is Europe Choosing to Disappear? by Giulio Meotti

If a group chooses to reproduce at less than the rate necessary to replace itself, that group will eventually disappear. From Giulio Meotti at gatestoneinstitute.org:

A sterile Europe apparently thought that civil liberties could be bargained away in exchange for a temporary peace. Everything became negotiable.

• As British author Douglas Murray has asked, why were workers not brought in from European countries suffering high unemployment, such as Portugal, Italy, Greece or Spain?

• A clear-eyed U.S. Congressman, Rep. Steve King, correctly said recently that, “You cannot rebuild your civilization with somebody else’s babies.” He instantly drew that white-hot fire reserved for people who tell truths that threaten treasured fantasies (think Giordano Bruno or Galileo).

The new data released by Italy’s National Institute for Statistics for 2016 sounds again like a death knell. There has been a new negative record of births: 474,000 compared to 486,000 for 2015, which had already fallen to historic lows. There were 608,000 deaths in 2016. In one year, Italy lost 134,000 people — the equivalent of a city of the size of Ferrara or Salerno.

The demographic “illusion” is kept only by the influx of immigration (135,000). If one needs an idea of what Italy would be without immigrants, look at Emilia-Romagna, one of Italy’s most populated and affluent regions: in 2035 it will have 20% fewer residents.

Italy is sometimes thought of Europe’s guinea pig: wherever Italy goes, much of Europe follows it, especially in the central and southern countries. In 1995, Antonio Golini, a professor at La Sapienza University and a former president of the National Institute of Statistics, was contacted by the director-general of Plasmon, Italy’s largest producer of baby food. Looking at the declining birth rates, the firm asked him if something could be done to prevent the company from going out of business. Plasmon started to make dietary products for adults.

A year ago, European geographers went in search of “the most desolate place in Europe”. They discovered it not in northern and cold Lapland, but in sunny Spain, specifically in the area of Molina de Aragon, two hours from Madrid. Depopulation has not been the consequence of the climate, as in the Russian steppe or northern forests, but of a demographic crisis.

To continue reading: Is Europe Choosing to Disappear?

Denmark on the Brink? – An Interview with Iben Tranholm, by Erico Matias Tavares

Denmark does not want to slide down the same slippery slope regarding Islamic immigration and assimilation as most of the rest of Europe, particularly the Scandanavian nations. From Erico Matias Tavares of Sinclair & Co. at linkedin.com:

Iben Thranholm examines political and social events with focus on their religious aspects, significance and moral implications. She is one of Denmark’s most widely read columnists on such matters. Thranholm is a former editor and radio host at the Danish Broadcasting Corporation (DR), at which she created a religious news program that set a new standard for religious analysis in the newsroom. She has traveled extensively in the Middle East, Italy, the United States and Russia to carry out research and interviews. She has been awarded for her investigative research into Danish media coverage of religious issues.

E Tavares: Iben, thank you for being with us today. Over a year ago we talked to Dr. Tino Sanandaji, an economics professor at a leading Swedish university, on the inconsistencies of Swedish immigration policies. The resulting post was hit, revealing a significant interest for this topic.

In a sense Sweden is the canary in the coalmine of Europe’s demographic future, since they have been at the forefront of this transformation and openly embrace it. Being a close neighbor we would like to get your views on what is happening there, as well as in Denmark. How to the Danes look at Sweden, with hope or apprehension?

I Tranholm: With absolute horror!

The Swedish media, which is quite pro-government and its leftwing policies, does not always report the full extent of the problems in their society. So it is hard to have a very accurate picture of what is going on. But we in Denmark have a good sense. We are very aware of the murders, rapes, riots, violence and the hand grenades that go on there. This does not often make the news but we know it is going on. And we don’t want to go down the same route.

This is the result of decades of policies promoting multiculturalism in Sweden. And what is left is this hollow house. You know, in the Bible it is said that if a house is left swept, tidied and unoccupied it eventually it will be taken over by evil. And I fear that this is what is happening in Sweden. Far from being a multicultural paradise, the problems can no longer remain hidden.

ET: Indeed, even President Trump made some controversial comments about Sweden at a recent rally in the US, causing an international uproar, with many debates on whether he was right or wrong. Did this cause some discussion in Denmark as well?

IT: It wasn’t much of a discussion because we in Denmark know what is happening in Sweden. Malmo is very close so we only need to go there to see it with our own eyes.

There was a TV ad partially paid by the Swedish government recommending that all Swedes integrate into this new multicultural society they are creating. Think about that. Even old Swedes now need to adjust to this new reality, instead of immigrants adapting to Swedish society. They call it “Det nya landet”, which means the new country. Traditional Sweden is gone.

To continue reading: Denmark on the Brink? – An Interview with Iben Tranholm