Tag Archives: Minimum corporate tax

3 Radical Government Programs and What They Mean for You Today, by Chris MacIntosh

We’re being fed programs from our rulers that will impoverish and enslave us. From Chris MacIntosh at internationalman.com:

When initiatives like vaccinating the planet, “climate change,” and implementing a minimum global corporate tax are on the G7 agenda, and they’re selling it to a citizenry who would be content with their peanut butter on toast because “they are doing their best for us,” you know that freedom-loving people are in for a lot of trouble.

All three of these initiatives in isolation would be (and should be) horrifying to any freedom-loving individual. Collectively they are the equivalent of grabbing the global economy, hoisting it up onto your shoulders, and then tightrope walking across the Grand Canyon blindfolded with a swarm of mosquitoes biting you, but only after drinking an entire bottle of Absolut vodka. You might make it across to the other side, but the odds are right up there with finding a juicy T-bone steak at a vegan festival.

What these initiatives cement is a collapse in living standards of the global citizenry and ultimately a rather dramatic increase in the likelihood of a major international war.

Why? By pushing the climate hysteria agenda with its bedfellow of “CO2 reduction” and forcing it upon developing nations, they will be forcing not just a decrease in living standards but sending billions of people (literally) into extreme poverty.

Continue reading→

The Global Minimum Corporate Tax Exposes The G-7’s Hypocrisy, by Robert Zumwalt

Setting a global minimum corporate tax rate is basically setting up a government tax cartel. From Robert Zumwalt at mises.org:

Austrian school economists have long demonstrated that monopolies only tend to form as a result of government intervention, and “natural monopolies” have virtually never actually existed. Nonetheless, we are continually told by political and academic “experts” that unregulated economies inevitably give rise to monopolies, business trusts, and cartels, all of which they assure us have disastrous consequences for ordinary people. Therefore, we are told, governments are justified in taking forceful action to prevent monopolies from developing or to break them apart.

In this debate, the interventionists frame themselves as opposing the anticompetitive forces of large corporations having too much control over the lives of ordinary people. It is noteworthy, then, that these same interventionists support similar kinds of anticompetitive practices, and the increased control over people’s lives they entail, when they are employed by governments instead.

To that end, the leaders of the G-7 nations have recently gathered to propose a global minimum corporate tax that would allow national governments to exert a form of monopoly power of their own over the taxation of business within their borders. A major element of the proposal, if brought to fruition, is the requirement that every nation impose a minimum corporate tax rate of at least 15 percent. The clear purpose of this part of the proposal is to eliminate the so-called race to the bottom in corporate taxes, which is a euphemism for high-tax nations’ hopes of shielding themselves from competition from nations with low tax rates seeking to attract businesses away from them.

Continue reading→