Tag Archives: snitches

The Worst Is Yet to Come: Contact Tracing, Immunity Cards and Mass Testing, by John W. Whitehead

The totalitarians are on a roll and don’t think they stop with their current successes. From John W. Whitehead at rutherford.org:

The things we were worried would happen are happening.”—Angus Johnston, professor at the City University of New York

No one is safe.

No one is immune.

No one gets spared the anguish, fear and heartache of living under the shadow of an authoritarian police state.

That’s the message being broadcast 24/7 with every new piece of government propaganda, every new law that criminalizes otherwise lawful activity, every new policeman on the beat, every new surveillance camera casting a watchful eye, every sensationalist news story that titillates and distracts, every new prison or detention center built to house troublemakers and other undesirables, every new court ruling that gives government agents a green light to strip and steal and rape and ravage the citizenry, every school that opts to indoctrinate rather than educate, and every new justification for why Americans should comply with the government’s attempts to trample the Constitution underfoot.

Yes, COVID-19 has taken a significant toll on the nation emotionally, physically, and economically, but there are still greater dangers on the horizon.

As long as “we the people” continue to allow the government to trample our rights in the so-called name of national security, things will get worse, not better.

It’s already worse.

Now there’s talk of mass testing for COVID-19 antibodies, screening checkpoints, contact tracing, immunity passports to allow those who have recovered from the virus to move around more freely, and snitch tip lines for reporting “rule breakers” to the authorities.

If you can’t read the writing on the wall, you need to pay better attention.

These may seem like small, necessary steps in the war against the COVID-19 virus, but they’re only necessary to the police state in its efforts to further undermine the Constitution, extend its control over the populace, and feed its insatiable appetite for ever-greater powers.

Continue reading

Coronavirus: Ten Things to Think About, by Justin Pavoni

Any actual thinking, as opposed to feeling or reacting, about coronavirus is to be encouraged. From Justin Pavoni at ronpaulinstitute.org:

undefined

1. All of this can be solved by following the voluntary principle: If you are worried then stay home. If you are willing to assume the risk then go to work. Going to work means you may interact with people and thus get sick. It’s a risk. The other people at work took on this risk of their own choosing too. Life is full of risks. Not going to work has its own obvious risks associated with it. Let people choose their own paths based on their own risk tolerance and voluntary choices. Don’t impose your view via government force on those of us that peacefully disagree with you.

2. There have been 23,000 US deaths so far this year due to flu, 3,000 from coronavirus. Worldwide stats are roughly in parallel. Legitimate population samples and common sense show that the virus has infected way more people than reported by the immoral news organizations that make money off this hysteria. It is highly likely that REAL death rates are closer to .05 percent rather than the oft-emphasized 3 percent.

3. Social Distancing makes people distrust one another. People that are afraid of each other are easier to control. We just had a house fire and while nobody will shake my hand because they’re afraid to death of coronavirus, they’ll happily walk around in the burned down home without a respirator. Of course the burned down house is far more likely to be an immediate and serious health threat. Anyone else see a problem here?

4. I have already seen certain local governments posting websites for all of us to tell on each other for congregating in groups. My wife has had skeptical posts removed from Facebook. Sounds a lot like the secret police to me.

Continue reading

Here’s China’s massive plan to retool the web, by P.W. Singer and Emerson Brooking

The Chinese government has no intention of allowing the Chinese version of the web to become anything like the semi-freewheeling forum it is in the US. From P.W. Singer and Emerson Brooking at popsci.com:

The most ambitious project of mass control is the country’s “social credit” system. All Chinese citizens will receive a numerical score reflecting their “trustworthiness.”

The following is adapted from LikeWar by P. W. Singer and Emerson T. Brooking, a book by two defense experts—one of which is the founder of the Eastern Arsenal blog at Popular Science —about how the Internet has become a new kind of battleground, following a new set of rules that we all need to learn.

“Across the Great Wall we can reach every corner in the world.”

So read the first email ever sent from the People’s Republic of China, zipping 4,500 miles from Beijing to Berlin. The year was 1987. Chinese scientists celebrated as their ancient nation officially joined the new global internet.
 As the Internet evolved from a place for scientists to a place for all netizens, its use in China gradually grew—then exploded. In 1996, there were just 40,000 people online in China; by 1999, there were 4 million. In 2008, China passed the United States in number of active internet users: 253 million. Today, that figure has tripled again to nearly 800 million (over a quarter of all the world’s people online).

Continue reading