Tag Archives: Social Credit System

The Game of Life: Visualizing China’s Social Credit System, from The Visual Capitalist

A graphic and text explanation of China’s chilling Social Credit System, from visualcapitalist.com:

China's Social Credit System

The Game of Life: Visualizing China’s Social Credit System

In an attempt to imbue trust, China has announced a plan to implement a national ranking system for its citizens and companies. Currently in pilot mode, the new system will be rolled out in 2020, and go through numerous iterations before becoming official.

While the system may be a useful tool for China to manage its growing 1.4 billion population, it has triggered global concerns around the ethics of big data, and whether the system is a breach of fundamental human rights.

Today’s infographic looks at how China’s proposed social credit system could work, and what the implications might be.

Continue reading

The US-China Decoupling, by Patrick Lawrence

It looks like the US and China will acrimoniously be going their separate ways. From Patrick Lawrence at consortiumnews.com:

The long, dense economic relationship appears to have passed its peak, writes Patrick Lawrence.

President Donald Trump’s trade war with China is swiftly taking a decisive turn for the worse.

Step by step, each measure prompting retaliation, a spat so far limited to tariff increases, now threatens to transform the bilateral relationship into one of managed hostility extending well beyond economic issues. Should Washington and Beijing define each other as adversaries, as they now appear poised to do, the consequences in terms of global stability and the balance of power in the Pacific are nearly incalculable.

The trade dispute continues to sharpen. Later this week Beijing is scheduled to raise tariffs already in place on $60 billion worth of American exports — the latest in a running series of escalations Washington set in motion nearly a year ago. Two weeks later the U.S., having increased tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese products earlier this month, is to consider imposing levies on an additional $325 billion worth of imports from the mainland.

Xi and Trump: In lighter mood.  (YouTube)

Continue reading

China’s Social Credit System – It’s Coming to the United States, by Marin Katusa

Everything is in place for the US government to copy China’s Social Credit Score system. From Marin Katusa at internationalman.com:

In 2015, a 16-year-old student from Jiangsu, China, tried to board a train.

She couldn’t even purchase a ticket.

The student, Zhong Pei, tried enrolling in classes at her university. But she was not allowed to do that either.

Zhong had committed a serious crime: She was guilty of being related to someone else.

Her father had killed two people and died in a car accident. So the Chinese government blacklisted her as “dishonest.”

It took her four months before she was able to overturn the decision and go to her university.

China’s Social Credit System – America’s New Nightmare?

What Zhong experienced was the result of testing for China’s new “Social Credit System.”

The SCS aims to be a unified program that provides a “social credit score” for every one of China’s 1.3 billion citizens.

But the Chinese government needed help develop the algorithms that determine social credit scores. So it enlisted eight companies for pilot programs, including its two largest, trusted social media companies: Tencent and Alibaba. They both came up with their own solutions: Alibaba’s affiliate Ant Financial rolled out its own “Sesame Credit” system. And Tencent had a nationwide system that was trialed for less than a day before it was taken down with pressure from the People’s Bank of China.

Continue reading

The Implicit Desperation of China’s “Social Credit” System, by Charles Hugh Smith

Charles Hugh Smith makes a keen distinction between power and force. From Smith at oftwominds.com:

Other governments are keenly interested in following China’s lead.
I’ve been pondering the excellent 1964 history of the Southern Song Dynasty’s capital of HangzhouDaily Life in China on the Eve of the Mongol Invasion, 1250-1276 by Jacques Gernet, in light of the Chinese government’s unprecedented “Social Credit Score” system, which I addressed in Kafka’s Nightmare Emerges: China’s “Social Credit Score”.
The scope of this surveillance is so broad and pervasive that it borders on science fiction: a recent Western visitor noted that train passengers hear an automated warning on certain lines, in Mandarin and English, that their compliance with regulations will be observed and may be punished via a poor social score.
In the Song Dynasty, arguably China’s high water mark in many ways (before the Mongol conquest changed China’s trajectory), social control required very little force. The power of social control rested in the cultural hierarchy of Confucian values: one obeyed the family’s patriarch, one’s local rulers and ultimately, the Emperor.

Continue reading

The Worst Part About Election Day: Somebody Wins, by Bill Bonner

No matter who wins the elections, the Deep State will still be running things. From Bill Bonner at bonnerandpartners.com:

And so… the big day approacheth.

People look for their registration cards… and prepare to cast their votes. Blue? Red? Liberal? Conservative?

It’s hard not to get caught up in the us-versus-them spirit of it. Like watching a football game, it’s more fun if you take sides.

But the trouble with elections is that one of the candidates wins. And the winner is almost always a bigger jackass than the other guy.

Continue reading

Here’s China’s massive plan to retool the web, by P.W. Singer and Emerson Brooking

The Chinese government has no intention of allowing the Chinese version of the web to become anything like the semi-freewheeling forum it is in the US. From P.W. Singer and Emerson Brooking at popsci.com:

The most ambitious project of mass control is the country’s “social credit” system. All Chinese citizens will receive a numerical score reflecting their “trustworthiness.”

The following is adapted from LikeWar by P. W. Singer and Emerson T. Brooking, a book by two defense experts—one of which is the founder of the Eastern Arsenal blog at Popular Science —about how the Internet has become a new kind of battleground, following a new set of rules that we all need to learn.

“Across the Great Wall we can reach every corner in the world.”

So read the first email ever sent from the People’s Republic of China, zipping 4,500 miles from Beijing to Berlin. The year was 1987. Chinese scientists celebrated as their ancient nation officially joined the new global internet.
 As the Internet evolved from a place for scientists to a place for all netizens, its use in China gradually grew—then exploded. In 1996, there were just 40,000 people online in China; by 1999, there were 4 million. In 2008, China passed the United States in number of active internet users: 253 million. Today, that figure has tripled again to nearly 800 million (over a quarter of all the world’s people online).

Continue reading

Surveillance, Economic Turmoil, and Chaos Among All Nations, by Jeremiah Johnson

Here is a blueprint for how the globalists plan to dominate the world. From Jeremiah Johnson at shtfplan.com:

The actions that are taken are a three-pronged attack in order to foster in global governance, and they are as such:

  1. Create ubiquitous electronic surveillance with unlimited police power
  2. Throw the entire earth into an economic tailspin
  3. Destroy all nationalism, national borders, and create chaos among all nations prior to an “incendiary event” or series of actions that leads to a world war.

The world war is the most important part of it all, in the eyes of the globalists. The Great Depression culminated in a world war, and periods of economic upheaval are always followed by wars. The war is most needed by the globalists because they need to rid the world of about 7 billion people. This is why such experimentation as you see progresses: infecting vectors such as mosquitoes with viruses that are almost immune to antibiotics, the unearthing of ancient viruses in the permafrost and frozen areas of the Arctic, and the insect-sized drones and smaller nanobots touted to bring a cure but in reality capable of delivering disease.

Continue reading