Category Archives: Investigations

Full Circle: Lessons of the Lost City in the Sands of Time, by Doug “Uncola” Lynn

Is a strange circular formation in the western Sahara the lost city of Atlantis? Doug “Uncola” Lynn ponders this question and what it means for our understanding of history. From Lynn at theburningplatform.com:

This post will be a little “outside of the box” so to speak. It’s more of an afterthought, really.  Therefore, it may not tie into current events and, specifically, the upcoming midterms and aftermath.  Or, in a roundabout way, it could be exactly about those coming events. Regardless, as always, it is the reader’s choice to tag along while simultaneously, and at your whim, possessing the power of the click.

Of course, that’s just one of the bonuses of being an internet animal.

Another includes the occasional morsels discovered when hunting and gathering online. These may often be feel-good stories that reassure one’s belief in humanity. Other examples might include new scientific breakthroughs that, at the time, are only reported on the shadowy fringes of the interwebic blogosphere.  Or maybe the tidbit is about a social, or health, tip that enriches one’s life. And, oftentimes, other postings are historical; even connecting antiquity with modernity in ways that resurrect the imaginations of childhood.

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Skripal and Khashoggi: A Tale of Two Disappearances, by Finian Cunningham

The presumption of innocence, as applied by the US government, is far stronger for Mohammad bin Salman than it is for Vladimir Putin. From Finian Cunningham at strategic-culture.org:

Two disappearances, and two very different responses from Western governments, which illustrates their rank hypocrisy.

When former Russian spy Sergei Skripal went missing in England earlier this year, there was almost immediate punitive action by the British government and its NATO allies against Moscow. By contrast, Western governments are straining with restraint towards Saudi Arabia over the more shocking and provable case of murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

The outcry by Western governments and media over the Skripal affair was deafening and resulted in Britain, the US and some 28 other countries expelling dozens of Russian diplomats on the back of unsubstantiated British allegations that the Kremlin tried to assassinate an exiled spy with a deadly nerve agent. The Trump administration has further tightened sanctions citing the Skripal incident.

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The Democrats’ IT Scandal, by Frank Miniter

Congress wants to sweep a potentially explosive IT scandal under the rug. From Frank Miniter at americanthinker.com:

After spending a year digging into the Democrats’ covered up I.T. scandal in Congress, I happen to know there is a lot here that Americans aren’t being allowed to know.  If all this group of I.T. administrators from Pakistan did in Congress doesn’t get out, then much of our freedom, which is wrapped up in this story, will be impacted.

The cover-up has been so effective that this isn’t happening.  Imran Awan, Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.)’s I.T. aide, got off without jail time or restitution on only bank fraud charges.  Congress got off without paying the price for possible corruption and for allowing a spy ring to run free in Congress.  We can’t even be sure that Congress has made the necessary reforms to stop another spy ring from infiltrating and spying on Congress and thereby using stolen data to blackmail a congressman, influence a vote, or just know where members of Congress stand on various pieces of legislation, all of which can impact us.

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Chill! by Raúl Ilargi Meijer

Trump will have to make some big decisions about Saudi Arabia. From Raúl Ilargi Meijer at theautomaticearth.com:

They can’t help themselves even as they hurt themselves. Look guys, chill! I saw someone imply on Twitter that Donald Trump is an accomplice in a murder cover-up. This person knows as well as all the ones who liked the tweet that they all just don’t know. They don’t know exactly what Trump knows about the chilling Khashoggi execution.

Just like they don’t know exactly what happened in the consulate. Information from anonymous Turkish sources is dripping through drop by drop, and it looks terrible -and terribly graphic-, but the conclusion that Trump wants to cover up a murder is multiple tokes over the line.

The Saudi attempt at labeling the execution a kidnapping gone wrong is out the window if only a tenth of the Turkish sources’ claims is true. What emerges is a picture of premeditated torture and murder. And one that was ordered by someone in the royal family. Which can really only be one of two people: the King or his son, MbS, and the latter seems more suspect. But what any of it has to do with Trump remains to be seen,

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The Saudi Collapse, by Justin Raimondo

It is long past time for the US to change, and perhaps end, its “special” relationship with the corrupt, repressive, and criminal Saudi Arabian government. From Justin Raimondo at antiwar.com:

The Saudis are doubling down on their denial that they had anything to do with the disappearance of Washington Post journalist and sometime Saudi insider Jamal Khashoggi: “enemies of the Kingdom,” they say are responsible. Nowadays that includes an awful lot of people, as the Washington cognoscenti rush to distance themselves from a regime once hailed as an exemplar of “reform.” It’s a stampede for the door, and soon there will be no on left standing: one rarely sees a collapse like this, at least when it comes to entire countries. One minute they’re on top of the world with Donald Trump, playing with swords and getting away with murder: the next minute they’re international pariahs.

Threatening “major consequences” if it turns out the Turks are right and the Saudis interrogated, tortured, and murdered Khashoggi, Trump may do far more than merely cut off Riyadh’s arms supply. He may decide to stop backing the Saudis entirely, abandoning their role as the anchor of US policy in the region, and subsequently downplaying and eventually abandoning the anti-Iranian obsession that has so far overshadowed our regional policy.

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Ex-FBI Top Lawyer: Rosenstein Wasn’t Joking About Recording, Removing Trump, by Tyler Durden

If Rosenstein wasn’t joking about recording and removing Trump, he should be fired immediately and a criminal investigation launched. From Tyler Durden at zerohedge.com:

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein wasn’t joking when he told former FBI officials Andrew McCabe and Lisa Page that he wanted to secretly record President Trump and use the tapes to remove him from office, according to the FBI’s former top lawyer.

Fox News reports that James Baker, who served as the FBI’s General Counsel before he was reassigned and then quit, told congressional investigators during a closed-door deposition last week that Page and McCabe relayed the same account of Rosenstein’s remarks – and that he was absolutely serious at the time.

“As far as Baker was concerned, this was a real plan being discussed,” reports The Hill‘s John Solomon, citing a confidential source.

“It was no laughing matter for the FBI,” the source added.

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Journalist’s Disappearance Forces Trump’s Hand on Saudi Arabia, by Jason Ditz

The line out of the Trump administration, the mainstream media, and the well-funded Saudi Arabian public relations machine is that Saudi Arabia is becoming less repressive and is changing in other positive ways. It and Israel are the US’s strongest allies in the Middle East. From Jason Ditz at theantimedia.org:

he disappearance of high-profile Saudi journalist, and regular writer for the Washington Post, Jamal Khashoggi has put the Trump Administration into an uncomfortable position, obliging them to raise the questions about the disappearance and presumptive murder of the man by Saudi officials.

Khashoggi’s connections with the Washington Post made this a much bigger story than the disappearances of most dissident journalists in the Middle East. That he was in exile for writings critical to the Saudi Crown Prince, and entered a Saudi consulate in Istanbul on October 2, but never came out, making it very likely he came to a bad end.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is calling for a “thorough” investigation by the Saudis into Khashoggi’s disappearance as well, which also virtually obliges the US to follow through when such an investigation doesn’t happen.

The Saudis, after all, insist that nothing happened to Khashoggi, and barring the Turkish government coming across his corpse at some point in the near future, that’s a position they’re likely to stick to.