Tag Archives: Flight

California’s governor makes ominous prediction for America, by Simon Black

Is California what America has in store for itself. Let’s hope not. From Simon Black at sovereignman.com:

California’s governor made a rather ominous prediction this weekend when he told an interviewer that “California is America. . . fast forward.”

He was talking specifically about the wildfires that have ravaged his state– a warning that the natural disasters will soon plague the rest of the country too, thanks to climate change.

But his comment should really be taken more broadly… because California really is a snapshot of America in the near future.

Just like America, there are a lot of incredible things about California. It’s home to some of the biggest, most ‘innovative’ tech companies in the world. It has a large, educated, highly skilled population.

Just by itself, the state is the 5th largest economy in the world. It’s a powerhouse. Or, at least, it should be. It has all the promise of America– Hollywood, Silicon Valley, sunshine, Disneyland, and endless possibilities… the place where dreams can come true.

And then there’s reality.

Yes, the state is ablaze and air quality has turned toxic. But that doesn’t even scratch the surface of the problems.

(The wildfires are indicative of a bigger problem, though. It’s not like wildfires are a rare occurrence in California. They happen every year. Yet somehow this government always gets caught with its pants down.)

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As U.S. Cities Crumble, Demand For Rural And Suburban Properties Is Soaring, by Michael Snyder

Was it just last year that urban living was considered cool, and the suburbans and rural areas were hopeless, uncool backwaters? From Michael Snyder at theendoftheamericandream.com:

Meanwhile, prices for rural and suburban homes are being pushed up as an increasing number of Americans seek to get away from the major cities.

At first, it was the coronavirus pandemic that was the primary reason why so many people wanted to move.  According to Redfin, page views for homes in rural communities and small towns were way, way up in March as the virus began to spread aggressively in the United States…

A report from Redfin (NASDAQ: RDFN) highlights this trend, showing that by late March, the seven-day average change in page views of homes in rural and small towns was up 115% and 88%, respectively.

Of course now the worst civil unrest in decades has been added to the equation, and this has caused even more city dwellers to consider a change in residence.  In fact, one poll found that approximately 40 percent of all city dwellers “are considering leaving”…

A recent Harris Poll found that more than 3 in 10 people in America say the pandemic makes them want to live in a rural area. And, 1 in 4 now want to live in a suburb exterior to a major city. In a separate Harris Poll, it was found that nearly 40% of city dwellers are considering leaving the city due to the pandemic.

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The Late Great State of California, by Jeffrey Harding

Our family left California seven years ago and we’ve never looked back. Lots of people have followed. From Jeffrey Harding at mises.org:

My family moved to California in 1950, part of the post-WWII westward migration. My widowed mother, tired of Boston’s dreary winters, felt the westward pull. My eldest brother, a WWII Navy veteran, had heard good things about San Diego from sailors who had been stationed there during the war. So, California, here we come.

I would like to think those were the golden years, at least for us. California was new, bright, warm, and full of promise. The East was old and cold. And San Diego was thriving. Defense and aerospace jobs were plentiful. Land was cheap, homes were cheap. A building boom met the housing needs for optimistic migrants. You could get things done in California.

It’s not that California anymore. We are overregulated and overtaxed and people aren’t so optimistic. People want to leave.

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He Said That? 5/5/15

From a review in The Wall Street Journal of The Wright Brothers by David McCullough (reviewed by Roger Lowenstein, “The Workingest Boys,” 5/5/15):

Other would-be aviation pioneers were gentlemen enthusiasts (i.e., they were rich). Not the Wrights. “In no way,” Mr. McCullough writes in one of his utterly affecting sentences, “did any of this discourage or deter Wilber and Orville Wright, any more than the fact that they had no college education, no formal technical training, no experience working with anyone other than themselves, no government subsidies, and little money of their own.”

That kind of self-reliant determination was behind America’s Industrial Revolution. See “History Lessons,” SLL, 4/23/15, and Robert Gore’s novel of the Industrial Revolution, The Golden Pinnacle.