Tag Archives: California

California and the Titanic

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The Late Great State of California, by Jeffrey Harding

Our family left California seven years ago and we’ve never looked back. Lots of people have followed. From Jeffrey Harding at mises.org:

My family moved to California in 1950, part of the post-WWII westward migration. My widowed mother, tired of Boston’s dreary winters, felt the westward pull. My eldest brother, a WWII Navy veteran, had heard good things about San Diego from sailors who had been stationed there during the war. So, California, here we come.

I would like to think those were the golden years, at least for us. California was new, bright, warm, and full of promise. The East was old and cold. And San Diego was thriving. Defense and aerospace jobs were plentiful. Land was cheap, homes were cheap. A building boom met the housing needs for optimistic migrants. You could get things done in California.

It’s not that California anymore. We are overregulated and overtaxed and people aren’t so optimistic. People want to leave.

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The Lights Go Out in Cali… and Maybe Not Just There, by Eric Peters

Has the new green future already arrived in California? From Eric Peters at ericpetersautos.com:

Americans got a glimpse of the Green Future last week – and it was pretty dark

Deliberate power outages have left millions of people in California with no lights – and no way to recharge their Teslas, either.

And it’s not because there isn’t enough power.

Rather, the state’s utility, Pacific Gas & Electric cut the power – ostensibly to prevent wildfires that might be started by downed (and hot) power lines.

But the real reason for the artificial blackout is PG&E’s massive – and government-mandated –  malinvestment in “green” technologies such as wind farms and solar, which has diverted billions away from critically needed infrastructure investment, such as burying power lines so that Santa Ana winds don’t result in downed lines  . .  . and fires. 

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The Lights Went Out in California: That Was the Plan All Along, by Chuck Devore

The lights aren’t going out in California because of climate change, but rather because of stupid policies and decisions. From Chuck Devore at wattsupwiththat.com:

The power has been out in Northern California. More than 1 million Californians were without electricity, one of modern life’s essentials that is frequently taken for granted. The blackout was done on purpose—to prevent sparks from powerlines that could ignite deadly wildfires.

On the surface, the blackout and its causes are simple to understand. But the deeper causes are complicated, span decades of public policy, and dozens of overlapping unintended—and intended—consequences of decisions, both related and unrelated.

The wind in Northern California is blowing in from dry Nevada, as it often does this time of year. It’s called the “Diablo wind.” In Southern California, the comparable current blowing in from the Mojave Desert is known as the “Santa Ana winds.”

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The Push For Mandatory Vaccines Is Galvanizing A Resistance Movement, by Richard Enos

Don’t be too surprised if this resistance movement ends up resisting a lot more than just mandatory vaccines. From Richard Enos at collective-evolution.com:

IN BRIEF

  • The Facts:Severe mandatory vaccination laws are suddenly popping up and getting passed in several states of late, but not without a fierce and growing opposition.
  • Reflect On:Will these mandatory vaccine laws, which are not about vaccines but rather about our individual sovereignty, catalyze us towards a greater emancipation from governmental interference and control?

The push for mandatory vaccines seems to be gaining momentum in the United States. To be more precise, states are beginning to look more at removing exemptions which currently allow non-vaccinated children to attend school. As per the CDC, each individual state has vaccination requirements for daycare and school entry that often apply not only to children attending public schools, but also to those attending private schools and daycare facilities. All states provide medical exemptions, and some state laws also offer exemptions for religious and/or philosophical reasons. State laws also establish mechanisms for enforcement of school vaccination requirements and exemptions.

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The California Tax, by Eric Peters

Because California is such a large automobile markets, it’s regulatory standards often end up governing the rest of the country. From Eric Peters at theburningplatform.com:

In 1861, eleven Southern states decided they no longer consented to be governed by Northern politicians – who had acquired de facto political control over the federal government – and thereby, over the entire country – by dint of the North’s greater numbers.

In an election, numbers matter.

But what happens when you’re not even allowed to vote for those who rule you?

California regulators have acquired de facto control over the cars you’re allowed to buy – even if you don’t live in California – by decreeing their own California-specific mileage and emissions standards. These end up having the force of national standards because the car industry – which wants to sell cars in California – can’t afford to build cars for just California and then another set of cars for the rest of the country.

So they build all their cars to meet California’s standards – which are even more corseting then federal (national) standards.

The cost of complying with them amounts to a “California Tax” levied on everyone – including those who don’t live in California.

It is literally taxation without representation – as well as legitimate justification.

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Gun Violence in California, by Jacob G. Hornberger

Don’t deranged criminals who go on violent rampages and shoot innocent people know that their possession of firearms is violating the law? Does gun violence at home have anything to do with military violence abroad? From Jacob G. Hornberger at fff.org:

Upon hearing that a man dressed in a military-style outfit was shooting people with an assault rifle at the Gilroy Garlic Festival in California on Sunday, I imagine that there were at least some Californians saying to themselves, “That’s impossible. It’s illegal in California to take an assault rifle into a public festival.” Indeed, according to Wikipedia, “The gun laws of California are some of the most restrictive in the United States.” So, what are gun-control advocates in California going to do now? Make their gun laws even more restrictive?

For 20 years, I have been writing that people who are going to kill other people with guns don’t give a hoot about gun laws. After all, at the risk of belaboring the obvious, if a person doesn’t care about obeying a law against murder, he’s not going to care about violating a law against taking an assault rifle into a food festival.

But ordinary, law-abiding people do care about obeying gun laws. That’s because many of these laws make it a felony offense to violate them. That means jail time, big fines, and a serious criminal record. Even when it’s just a misdemeanor offense, oftentimes a conviction can also mean jail time.

For most people, violating the law in order to have a means of self-defense is just not worth the risk. The chances of being caught in a place where some mass murderer is indiscriminately shooting people is relatively low and, therefore, not enough to justify the risk of a felony conviction if caught with, say, a concealed handgun for self-defense.

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