Category Archives: Technology

Doug Casey on Electric and Self-Driving Vehicles, Part I

Doug Casey is more bullish on electric and self-driving cars than Eric Peters. From Casey at caseyresearch.com:

Chris’ note: We’re in the middle of a revolutionary trend…

As we’ve been showing you, the car industry is rapidly changing because of two growing technologies: electric vehicles (EVs) and self-driving cars.

EVs aren’t like traditional vehicles. They run on electricity instead of gasoline or diesel.

Not long ago, just a few hundred of these vehicles existed. Now, there are nearly 5.1 million EVs on the roads… and that number grows by the day.

And self-driving cars are only becoming more popular as well. By next year, estimates say there’ll be 10 million self-driving cars in use.

In short, these technologies are the future. Even our founder, Doug Casey, thinks so. And when Doug gets excited about something, I get him on the phone to find out why.

Read on to see what Doug has to say about this megatrend… and don’t miss tomorrow’s Dispatch, when Doug and I finish this important discussion…


Chris: Doug, you’ve mentioned how electric vehicles [EVs] will become a huge deal. What makes you say that?

Doug: There’s no doubt that electric vehicles are going to put an end to the internal combustion engine [ICE]. I want to not only explain why – but some related changes that are much bigger, that almost nobody has thought about.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Beware Awakening China, by Eric S. Margolis

In a relatively short time China has reinstated itself as a super power, and the US is going to have to live with it. From Eric Margolis at lewrockwell.com:

“China is a sleeping giant.  Let her sleep, for when she wakes she will move the world.”  Napoleon

France’s future emperor never saw China, but he was wise enough to understand its immense latent strength and future importance.  Two centuries after making this prediction, China has proved the Corsican correct.

Last week, China feted the 70th anniversary of the Communist takeover of the mainland.  It was a gala demonstration of the nation’s military and social power.  I recall watching the 60th anniversary celebration in Hong Kong and wondering at how amazingly far China had come since I first went there in the early 1980’s.

Continue reading

Another Way EVs Will Cost Us, by Eric Peters

Electric car production will probably cost a lot of auto workers their jobs. From Eric Peters at ericpetersautos.com:

Lost in the fatuous fake news juggernaut about the supposed misdeeds of the relentlessly besieged Orange Man has been real – and important news – about the longest nationwide strike by autoworkers in almost 50 years.

The target of the strike is General Motors. The United Auto Workers haven’t been working since September 16. Almost all GM plants have been idled since then, with the exception of the truck plant in Silao, Mexico. But a shortage of parts caused by the idling of the plants north of the border will almost certainly cause the truck plant to go silent soon, too.

The closures are costing GM about $25 million per day in lost profit, according to analysts.

But they could cost autoworkers – and us – much more.

Continue reading

The Tech Giants Are a Conduit for Fascism, by Michael Krieger

The tech giants are aiding and abetting the government’s ever-increasing repression and curtailment of liberty. From Michael Krieger at libertyblitzkrieg.com:

A second former Amazon employee would spark more controversy. Deap Ubhi, a former AWS employee who worked for Lynch, was tasked with gathering marketing information to make the case for a single cloud inside the DOD. Around the same time that he started working on JEDI, Ubhi began talking with AWS about rejoining the company. As his work on JEDI deepened, so did his job negotiations. Six days after he received a formal offer from Amazon, Ubhi recused himself from JEDI, fabricating a story that Amazon had expressed an interest in buying a startup company he owned. A contracting officer who investigated found enough evidence that Ubhi’s conduct violated conflict of interest rules to refer the matter to the inspector general, but concluded that his conduct did not corrupt the process. (Ubhi, who now works in AWS’ commercial division, declined comment through a company spokesperson.)

Ubhi worsened the impression by making ill-advised public statements while still employed by the DOD. In a tweet, he described himself as “once an Amazonian, always an Amazonian.”

– From the must read ProPublica expose: How Amazon and Silicon Valley Seduced the Pentagon

That U.S. tech giants are willing participants in facilitating mass government surveillance has been widely known for a while, particularly since whistleblower Edward Snowden risked his life and liberty to tell us about it six years ago. We also know what happens to executives who don’t play ball.

Continue reading→

 

‘There Is No Climate Emergency’: Scientists Call for Reasoned Debate, by Richard Trzupek

Voices of sanity and rationality in the climate debate! From Richard Trzupek at theepochtimes.com:

The message was clear: “There is no climate emergency.”

With those five simple words, a global network of scientistsand professionals attempted to inject reasonableness and decorum into what should be a robust discussion about a complex scientific and public policy issue, but has instead degenerated into an ever more intense mud-slinging contest over the years.

People on one side of the argument dismiss their opponents as wild-eyed socialists attempting to leverage public fear and ignorance to further their political agenda. On the opposite side, people dismiss those who disagree with their supposedly settled scientific conclusions as nothing more than knowing shills or ignorant dupes of evil energy interests.

In between those extremes that are so popular with armies of public relations professionals, who shape the messages of public interest groups and professional politicians to maximum effect, are a not-so-quiet silent majority of scientists and professionals who take a more measured, reasoned view of the science when considering the supposed climate emergency some say we’re facing.

Continue reading

The Game of Life: Visualizing China’s Social Credit System, from The Visual Capitalist

A graphic and text explanation of China’s chilling Social Credit System, from visualcapitalist.com:

China's Social Credit System

The Game of Life: Visualizing China’s Social Credit System

In an attempt to imbue trust, China has announced a plan to implement a national ranking system for its citizens and companies. Currently in pilot mode, the new system will be rolled out in 2020, and go through numerous iterations before becoming official.

While the system may be a useful tool for China to manage its growing 1.4 billion population, it has triggered global concerns around the ethics of big data, and whether the system is a breach of fundamental human rights.

Today’s infographic looks at how China’s proposed social credit system could work, and what the implications might be.

Continue reading

The Illusion of Control, by Robert Gore

The US empire may be history’s last.

The illusion of control that has sustained the US’s nominal government and its behind-the scenes power since World War II is fading both at home and abroad. In many areas the US military is no longer unquestionably superior and in some is demonstrably inferior. As military prowess goes so goes the American empire. Amplifying the decline and compounding its severity are the US’s perilous finances, deteriorating economy, and mounting political unrest.

That US military power was never all it was cracked it up to be was apparent to astute observers after the Korean War, and was obvious after Vietnam. Possible escalation and humanity’s extinction precluded use of nuclear weapons. However, in both Korea and Vietnam local populations, with assistance from outside allies, withstood mind-boggling barrages of conventional bombs and munitions to gain in Korea a stalemate and in Vietnam a victory.

Vietnam demonstrated the difficulty for invaders of fighting determined insurgents using guerrilla tactics—usually labeled terrorism—defending their home territory. The insurgents know the territory and the language and often enjoy the covert support of the local, ostensibly non-combatant population. In Vietnam they also received covert and overt support from China and the USSR.

Continue reading