Category Archives: Technology

Is Netflix being run by the United States Congress? by Simon Black

Fiscally, Netflix runs a lot like a government, going deeper in debt every day. From Simon Black at sovereignman.com:

Shares of Netflix soared today on news the company lost a record $859 million in cash in the third quarter.

Why are investors applauding this egregious destruction of capital?

Well, it’s because investors only look at one number when Netflix reports earnings – subscriber growth.

And on that metric, the company outperformed, adding 6.96 million subscribers, bringing the global total to more than 137 million.

At 137 million subscribers, Netflix has about 2% of the global population as customers.

There are still around 90 million traditional TV accounts in the US (and about 36% of those also have a streaming account).

So there’s definitely room for Netflix to grow in the US and abroad (where the majority of growth is coming today).

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The Democrats’ IT Scandal, by Frank Miniter

Congress wants to sweep a potentially explosive IT scandal under the rug. From Frank Miniter at americanthinker.com:

After spending a year digging into the Democrats’ covered up I.T. scandal in Congress, I happen to know there is a lot here that Americans aren’t being allowed to know.  If all this group of I.T. administrators from Pakistan did in Congress doesn’t get out, then much of our freedom, which is wrapped up in this story, will be impacted.

The cover-up has been so effective that this isn’t happening.  Imran Awan, Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.)’s I.T. aide, got off without jail time or restitution on only bank fraud charges.  Congress got off without paying the price for possible corruption and for allowing a spy ring to run free in Congress.  We can’t even be sure that Congress has made the necessary reforms to stop another spy ring from infiltrating and spying on Congress and thereby using stolen data to blackmail a congressman, influence a vote, or just know where members of Congress stand on various pieces of legislation, all of which can impact us.

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New Evidence of Hacked Supermicro Hardware Found in U.S. Telecom, by Jordan Robertson and Michael Riley

Bloomberg reported last week that Amazon, Apple, and other companies had installed hardware from Super Micro Computing Inc. that had tiny spy chips built in during assembly in China. Amazon and Apple denied they had done so. However, a new story from Bloomberg adds additional detail and supporting evidence. From Jordan Robertson and Michael Riley at bloomberg.com:

A major U.S. telecommunications company discovered manipulated hardware from Super Micro Computer Inc. in its network and removed it in August, fresh evidence of tampering in China of critical technology components bound for the U.S., according to a security expert working for the telecom company.

The security expert, Yossi Appleboum, provided documents, analysis and other evidence of the discovery following the publication of an investigative report in Bloomberg Businessweek that detailed how China’s intelligence services had ordered subcontractors to plant malicious chips in Supermicro server motherboards over a two-year period ending in 2015.

Yossi Appleboum
Source: Yossi Appleboum

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Hot Economic Warfare: Scrambling for Rare-Earth Minerals, by Wayne Madsen

A bunch of rocks you probably have never heard of are the subjects of intense geopolitical competition. From Wayne Madsen at strategic-culture.org:

Just like the gold rushes of California between 1848 and 1855, Canada’s Klonike of 1896 to 1899, and Western Australia’s of the 1890s, the world is experiencing a frenzy to obtain mining rights in pursuit of today’s “gold,” namely rare earth minerals. Used for components of electric vehicle batteries, mobile telephones, flat-screen televisions, flash drives, cameras, precision-guided missiles, industrial magnets, wind turbines, solar panels, and other high-tech items, rare earth minerals have become the type of sought-after commodity that uranium and plutonium were during the onset of the atomic age.

Rare earth minerals do not easily roll off one’s tongue in the same manner as gold, silver, and platinum. For example, yttrium oxide and europium, while sounding unimportant, are what provide the red hue in color televisions.

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How Globalists Plan To Use Technology And Poverty To Enslave The Masses, by Brandon Smith

First they’ll bankrupt us, then they’ll enslave us. From Brandon Smith at alt-market.com:

Tyranny is often seen as a sudden and inexplicable development in a society; the product of a singular despot that rockets to power for a limited window of time due to public fear or stupidity. This is one of the great lies of the modern era.

The truth is that for at least the past century almost every historically despised “tyrant” was merely a puppet of a larger managerial cabal, and the construction of each totalitarian state was accomplished slowly and quietly over the course of decades by those same financial elitists. From the Bolsheviks, to Hitler and the Third Reich, to Mao Zedong, to most tin-pot dictators across the Middle East and Africa, there has always been an organized group of money men and think tanks fueling the careers of the worst politicians and military juntas of the epoch.

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The Big Hack: How China Used a Tiny Chip to Infiltrate U.S. Companies, by Jordan Robertson and Michael Riley

A chip the size of a rice grain may be allowing who knows who to spy on your computer and you. From Jordan Robertson and Michael Riley at bloomberg.com:

In 2015, Amazon.com Inc. began quietly evaluating a startup called Elemental Technologies, a potential acquisition to help with a major expansion of its streaming video service, known today as Amazon Prime Video. Based in Portland, Ore., Elemental made software for compressing massive video files and formatting them for different devices. Its technology had helped stream the Olympic Games online, communicate with the International Space Station, and funnel drone footage to the Central Intelligence Agency. Elemental’s national security contracts weren’t the main reason for the proposed acquisition, but they fit nicely with Amazon’s government businesses, such as the highly secure cloud that Amazon Web Services (AWS) was building for the CIA.

To help with due diligence, AWS, which was overseeing the prospective acquisition, hired a third-party company to scrutinize Elemental’s security, according to one person familiar with the process. The first pass uncovered troubling issues, prompting AWS to take a closer look at Elemental’s main product: the expensive servers that customers installed in their networks to handle the video compression. These servers were assembled for Elemental by Super Micro Computer Inc., a San Jose-based company (commonly known as Supermicro) that’s also one of the world’s biggest suppliers of server motherboards, the fiberglass-mounted clusters of chips and capacitors that act as the neurons of data centers large and small. In late spring of 2015, Elemental’s staff boxed up several servers and sent them to Ontario, Canada, for the third-party security company to test, the person says.

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Uranium One: FBI Refuses To Release Three-Dozen Secret Memos Involving Clintons, Russia And Obama, by Tyler Durden

Sitting towards the bottom of the Clinton/Obama compost heap, waiting to be uncovered, is the Uranium One scandal. From Tyler Durden at zerohedge.com:

The FBI has refused to declassify 37 pages of materials related to the Uranium One deal, citing national security and the privacy issues, reports The Hill‘s John Solomon. The documents are thought to contain information regarding then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s involvement, as well as the Obama administration’s knowledge of the controversial deal.

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