Tag Archives: Police

You’re a Little Whitey, Aren’t Ya? by Porter

You know the left has gone over the deep end when white males are demonizing white males…because they’re white males. From Porter at kakistocracyblog.com:

Diversity destroys diversity. This is as axiomatic as it is meticulously unmentioned. To state the obvious, turning every unique human genetic profile on Earth into an indistinguishable mustard-brown hybrid is hardly the work of an honest diversity enthusiast. But maybe if they’re all wearing Nikes while listening to rap on an iPhone the fine distinctions will come more into focus.

The truth is human diversity resides in abundance even where there is no “diversity.” Diversity exists between separate but similar nations, as well as those nations that should be separate if God weren’t so mischievous.

Consider one obvious example: Southern conservatives and north corner leftists. That these two disparate groups share the same polity is surely the work of providence that feels affection for neither. Yet visibly they are very similar creatures. But so are king and coral snakes. And who can really say which you’d rather have share your bed sheets.

The point being that non-diverse populations can be very diverse indeed. Portland, Oregon is one of those highly diverse places. I’ve spent a fair amount of time in that city; most of it pining for Mogadishu.

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Empire of Lies: Are ‘We the People’ Useful Idiots in the Digital Age? by John Whitehead

The title question almost answers itself. From John W. Whitehead at rutherford.org:

“Back in the heyday of the old Soviet Union, a phrase evolved to describe gullible western intellectuals who came to visit Russia and failed to notice the human and other costs of building a communist utopia. The phrase was “useful idiots” and it applied to a good many people who should have known better. I now propose a new, analogous term more appropriate for the age in which we live: useful hypocrites. That’s you and me, folks, and it’s how the masters of the digital universe see us. And they have pretty good reasons for seeing us that way. They hear us whingeing about privacy, security, surveillance, etc., but notice that despite our complaints and suspicions, we appear to do nothing about it. In other words, we say one thing and do another, which is as good a working definition of hypocrisy as one could hope for.”—John Naughton, The Guardian

“Who needs direct repression,” asked philosopher Slavoj Zizek, “when one can convince the chicken to walk freely into the slaughterhouse?”

In an Orwellian age where war equals peace, surveillance equals safety, and tolerance equals intolerance of uncomfortable truths and politically incorrect ideas, “we the people” have gotten very good at walking freely into the slaughterhouse, all the while convincing ourselves that the prison walls enclosing us within the American police state are there for our protection.

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From Boston to Ferguson to Charlottesville: The Evolution of a Police State Lockdown, by John W. Whitehead

People have to come to accept lockdowns as routine and normal police procedure. They’re an affront to the Constitution. From John W. Whitehead at rutherford.org:

“It takes a remarkable force to keep nearly a million people quietly indoors for an entire day, home from work and school, from neighborhood errands and out-of-town travel. It takes a remarkable force to keep businesses closed and cars off the road, to keep playgrounds empty and porches unused across a densely populated place 125 square miles in size. This happened … not because armed officers went door-to-door, or imposed a curfew, or threatened martial law. All around the region, for 13 hours, people locked up their businesses and ‘sheltered in place’ out of a kind of collective will. The force that kept them there wasn’t external – there was virtually no active enforcement across the city of the governor’s plea that people stay indoors. Rather, the pressure was an internal one – expressed as concern, or helpfulness, or in some cases, fear – felt in thousands of individual homes.”—Journalist Emily Badger, “The Psychology of a Citywide Lockdown”

It has become way too easy to lockdown this nation.

Five years ago, the city of Boston was locked down while police carried out a military-style manhunt for suspects in the 2013 Boston Marathon explosion.

Four years ago, the city of Ferguson, Missouri, was locked down, with government officials deploying a massive SWAT team, an armored personnel carrier, men in camouflage pointing heavy artillery at the crowd, smoke bombs and tear gas to quell citizen unrest over a police shooting of a young, unarmed black man.

Three years ago, the city of Baltimore was put under a military-enforced lockdown after civil unrest over police brutality erupted into rioting. More than 1,500 national guard troops were deployed while residents were ordered to stay inside their homes and put under a 10 pm curfew.

This year, it was my hometown of Charlottesville, Va., population 50,000, that was locked down while government officials declared a state of emergency and enacted heightened security measures tantamount to martial law, despite the absence of any publicized information about credible threats to public safety.

To continue reading: From Boston to Ferguson to Charlottesville: The Evolution of a Police State Lockdown

What it Means to be a Law Enforcer . . . by Eric Peters

Law enforcers enforce the law, no matter how idiotic or unjust. From Eric Peters at theburningplatform.com:

It is no accident that police have become more brutal – in appearance as well as action – since they became law enforcement.

The term itself is a brutal syllogism. The law exists and must be enforced because it is the law. I am just doing my job, only following (lawful) orders. People were hanged for using such reasoning to justify the enforcement of vicious, evil laws and went to the gallows baffled as to why.

Victor’s justice, they called it. And perhaps they were right, if a bit prematurely.

Today’s defendants – well, one hopes that they will be that, one day – are just as guilty in kind if not degree.

They enforce the laws. All of them. They do not question the rightness of any of them. The law is the law.

It ought to raise hairs on the back of any thinking person’s neck.

Law enforcement countenances anything, provided the law says so. It is what has made it possible for law enforcers to seize people’s property without charge or due process of any sort – because the law (civil asset forfeiture) gives them the power to do it. Some do it perfunctorily – the banality of evil Hannah Arendt wrote about. Others do it zealously – this includes the rabid little man who is the chief law enforcement officer of the state, Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

It is what enables “good Americans” (the same as “good Germans”) to stand in the middle of the road, halting every car at gunpoint (implied, even if not actually drawn; see what happens if you do not stop) and demanding “papers” be presented.

Without feeling ashamed of themselves.

Because the law says it is “reasonable” to do this. (If so, then it is not-rape to briefly penetrate an unwilling victim – which action by the way law enforcers also perform under color of the law but call it “looking for contraband” rather than rape.)

To continue reading: What it Means to be a Law Enforcer . . .

The 2017 Statistics Just Came out — and the ‘War on Cops’ Is Officially a Myth, by Carey Wedler

The “War on Cops” has been vastly overblown, while questionable or unjustified killings by cops often receive little publicity and the cops are rarely punished. From Carey Wedler at theantimedia.org:

Though right-wing commentators continue to decry the ‘war on cops,’ the latest data released by the country’s top law enforcement undermines that alarmist narrative.

According to the FBI’s annual Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted report, released this week, there were fewer police deaths in 2017 than in 2016. In 2016, 118 law enforcement officers died in the line of duty while in 2017, that number was 93.

More telling is the type of death the officers suffered. Last year, 46 officers were killed “feloniously” on the job while 47 died in accidents. As the FBI’s press release noted, “Both numbers have decreased from 2016, during which 66 officers were feloniously killed and 52 were accidentally killed, for a total of 118 line-of-duty deaths.”

The data is collected from “local, state, tribal, campus, and federal law enforcement agencies from around the country, as well as organizations that track officer deaths.

A closer look at the statistics reveals further just how nonexistent the war on cops actually is. Of the 46 officers feloniously killed on the job, five were ambushed (defined as “entrapment/premeditation” by the FBI) and 3 were victims of unprovoked attacks. Twenty-one died during “investigative or enforcement activities,” which include traffic stops, investigating suspicious persons, or tactical situations.

In other words, they were killed doing the jobs they signed up to do (consider the popular refrain that ‘cops risk their lives’ — that’s part of the job description), though police officer does not even crack the top ten most dangerous jobs in the United States.

The takeaway here is that while some officers die on the job — and that is unfortunate — the deliberate sentiment to kill officers simply because they are police officers is not on the rise.

Thirty-five officers died in car accidents — more than four times the number killed by ambushes and unprovoked attacks (eight) — and according to the FBI, “of the 29 officers killed in automobile accidents, 12 were wearing seatbelts, and 15 were not,” though two of the officers not wearing seatbelts were sitting in parked cars.  Regardless, more officers died in car accidents while not wearing seatbelts (a violation of the laws they enforce, as it happens) than died as a result of flagrant attacks on their lives isolated from situational circumstances.

To continue reading: The 2017 Statistics Just Came out — and the ‘War on Cops’ Is Officially a Myth

Video: Police Search Man’s Anus and Genitals for Non-Existent Weed, by Carey Wedler

Yes, you can be pulled over for a traffic violation, and if the police claim they smell marijuana, they can conduct a cavity search by the side of the road. That’s how far civil liberties have deteriorated in this country. From Carey Wedler at theantimedia.org:

New Jersey state troopers are facing a lawsuit after conducting an aggressive cavity search of a driver in Southampton in March of last year. Footage recorded by the officers’ body cameras shows the extent of the search, which the driver, Jack Levine, vocally opposed. The video was recently published after an open government advocate came across the case.

The video begins with Levine in back of state trooper Andrew Whitmore’s car, refusing to speak to them. Whitmore tells him the odor of cannabis gives them probable cause to search the vehicle.

The officer walks over to state trooper Joseph Drew, who is searching Levine’s car.

Smell anything in here? Negative?” Whitmore says. “Alright, because the dude that I removed, the driver, I moved him, I put him in the back of my vehicle, and my vehicle reeks.”

He adds:

He does reek, I think he may have something on him, he may have stashed it somewhere.”

That’s what I’m thinking,” Drew responds.

Whitmore says he thinks the cannabis is stashed somewhere they can’t easily access. “It’s not in his pockets,” he says.

Shortly after, Drew begins checking Levine’s waistband, and Levine mildly, vocally expresses his disapproval.

If you think that this is the worst thing I’m gonna do to you right now, you have another thing coming, my friend,” Drew says.

“This is ridiculous. This is like sexual assault. I don’t even have [anything] in my pants, what are you doing?” Levine eventually says.

“Definitely getting the odor when you open his pants. Smell that?” one officer says, as the other affirms.

Levine expresses his desire to resolve the incident:

“Alright, look, do you want me to take my boxers off right here so I don’t have to waste your time and go downtown ‘cause you think I got weed? Like what do you want me to do? Like seriously, I have to go to work. You want me to take my clothes off? I would be more than happy to, officers.”

 

To continue reading: Video: Police Search Man’s Anus and Genitals for Non-Existent Weed

Enough Is Enough: If You Really Want to Save Lives, Take Aim at Government Violence, by John W. Whitehead

The government wrongly kills far more people every year than all the crazed loonies who open fire in public places put together. From John W. Whitehead at rutherford.org:

“It is often the case that police shootings, incidents where law enforcement officers pull the trigger on civilians, are left out of the conversation on gun violence. But a police officer shooting a civilian counts as gun violence. Every time an officer uses a gun against an innocent or an unarmed person contributes to the culture of gun violence in this country.”—Journalist Celisa Calacal

Enough is enough.

That was the refrain chanted over and over by the thousands of demonstrators who gathered to protest gun violence in America.

Enough is enough.

We need to do something about the violence that is plaguing our nation and our world.

Enough is enough.

The world would be a better place if there were fewer weapons that could kill, maim, destroy and debilitate.

Enough is enough.

On March 24, 2018, more than 200,000 young people took the time to march on Washington DC and other cities across the country to demand that their concerns about gun violence be heard.

More power to them.

I’m all for activism, especially if it motivates people who have been sitting silently on the sidelines for too long to get up and try to reclaim control over a runaway government.

Curiously, however, although these young activists were vocal in calling for gun control legislation that requires stricter background checks and limits the kinds of weapons being bought and sold by members of the public, they were remarkably silent about the gun violence perpetrated by their own government.

Enough is enough.

Why is no one taking aim at the U.S. government as the greatest purveyor of violence in American society and around the world?

The systemic violence being perpetrated by agents of the government has done more collective harm to the American people and our liberties than any single act of terror or mass shooting.

Violence has become our government’s calling card, starting at the top and trickling down, from the more than 80,000 SWAT team raids carried out every year on unsuspecting Americans by heavily armed, black-garbed commandos and the increasingly rapid militarization of local police forces across the country to the drone killings used to target insurgents.

Enough is enough.

The government even exports violence worldwide, with weapons being America’s most profitable export.

To continue reading: Enough Is Enough: If You Really Want to Save Lives, Take Aim at Government Violence