Category Archives: Sports

ESPN Pulls Asian Announcer Named Robert Lee To Avoid A Mass Triggering Event, by Tyler Durden

SLL rarely watches ESPN, but for this idiocy SLL readers might want to rediscover their families or good books and not watch the sports network. As always, it’s our readers’ decision, but this kind of  insanity should not go unpunished. From Tyler Durden at zerohedge.com:

We’ve been saying this a lot lately, but just when you thought the political climate in this country couldn’t get any more wacky ESPN has to go and pull an Asian-American announcer, who just happens to be named Robert Lee, off the William and Mary vs. University of Virginia college football game because of concerns they might create a mass-triggering of America’s snowflakes. 

Is this even real life anymore?  So the fragile millennial culture now demands that you should be thrown in jail if you call them by the wrong pronoun but it’s totally fine if their insecurities literally derail a person’s career because they refuse to be ‘assaulted’ by the name his parents happened to give him?

Outkick the Coverage broke the story last night with this summary:

In a story that seems made for The Onion, but is actually true, according to multiple Outkick fans inside ESPN MSESPN decided to pull an Asian college football announcer named Robert Lee off the William and Mary at University of Virginia college football game because they were concerned that having an ASIAN FOOTBALL ANNOUNCER NAMED ROBERT LEE would be offensive to some viewers.

Did I mention that Robert Lee is Asian?

Is this even real life anymore? This might even be worse than MSESPN apologizing for the fantasy football slave draft a couple of weeks ago.

To avoid offending left wing idiots Robert Lee, the Asian college football announcer, not the Confederate General who died in 1870 and shares a name with him, was switched to the Youngstown State at Pittsburgh game and Dave Weekley will now call the William and Mary at University of Virginia game.

To continue reading: ESPN Pulls Asian Announcer Named Robert Lee To Avoid A Mass Triggering Event

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He Said That? 7/16/17

After five years without a major tennis title, Roger Federer won the Wimbledon men’s singles championship today at the age of 35. Federer has always been a classy athlete, and has more major tennis titles, 19, than any other male tennis player in history. From Federer:

“To mark history here at Wimbledon really means a lot to me; it’s that simple,” Federer said soon after walking from the court. “[But] funny enough, I didn’t think that much of it throughout today, throughout the trophy ceremony. I was just happy that I was able to win Wimbledon again, because it’s been a long road. It’s been tough at times … but that’s how it’s supposed to be.”

 

Fake News, by The Zman

Journalistic standards have deteriorated, and much so-called news is reporters making up rumors and then shooting them down. From the Zman at theburningplatform.com:

I think I may have watched a grand total of one NBA game this past season. The games are not geared for middle-aged white guys. The game has been changed over the years to value running and jumping over teamwork and developed skills. The result is that basketball looks a lot like track and field, rather than a skills game. That’s not a moral argument, just a factual observation. I do follow the game through the stat sheet, as it is a good study of human bio-diversity and not just what is on the court.

The other aspect of the NBA that makes it interesting to me is the conduct of the sports media covering the NBA. It is a good model for understanding what has happened to the mainstream media, particularly with regards to politics. The NBA press does very little reporting. There are still game summaries posted on-line and box scores, but those are churned out by interns and robots. The professional NBA journalist does no actual reporting, Instead, he talks about story lines, personalities and other sport reporters.

The recent NBA draft is a good example. Every year the “reporters” claim it is going to be a wild week of trades and deals. Then they spend the week talking about rumors that are made up by other reporters. Those rumors are often just about rumors. It is not unusual to see a story about how it is rumored that a trade was rumored to have been mentioned by someone. Meta-news is news about news. The NBA is now doing news and rumors about rumors. That’s meta-meta-rumor-news, I guess.

The reason for all this is the news media no longer bothers to uphold any of its alleged standards. It was not that long ago that editors required two sources that were actual human beings with a credible claim to know the material. Newspapers might bend this rule, but they never went with copy that contained sources unknown to the editor. That’s no longer the case as editors no long exist in sufficient numbers to police it and the remaining ones simply don’t care. Anything goes so its all fake sources now.

To continue reading: Fake News

ESPN and the Bursting of the Sports Bubble, by William L. Anderson

This article manages to tie in sports, higher education, and economics in an interesting and provocative fashion. From William L. Anderson at mises.org:

When the cable TV sports giant ESPN announced 100 layoffs recently, including letting go a number of high-profile broadcasters, a lot of people took notice, and well they should: things no longer are business as usual in sports broadcasting, and we are not even at the beginning of the end, and maybe not even the end of the beginning.

Like the slow crashing of the retail sector as online purchase firms like Amazon begin their domination, we are seeing a sea change in sports broadcasting and that is going to mean big changes are down the road not only for ESPN, but for all of the sports entities that depend upon the huge payouts that ESPN provides. To put it mildly, a lot of people are about to see their lives change drastically as consumer choices drive sports broadcasting in a new direction.

Enough with the superlatives. What is happening with ESPN, and why is it important? As Clay Travis of the sports website Outkick the Coverage has been writing for more than a year, the main ESPN business plan, the one that brings in the most revenues to the firm, is doomed to near-extinction, and there is nothing ESPN can do about it. Writes Travis:

In the past five years ESPN has lost 11,346,000 subscribers according to Nielsen data.

If you combine that with ESPN2 and ESPNU subscriber losses this means that ESPN has lost over a billion dollars in cable and satellite revenue just in the past five years, an average of $200 million each year. That total of a billion dollars hits ESPN in the pocketbook not just on a yearly basis, but for every year going forward.

It’s gone forever.

Since it began to grow in popularity in the late 1970s, cable (and later, satellite) television has offered its customers coverage with “bundles,” that is different payments allow cable subscribers to expand their viewership as payments increase. For example, a “basic” cable subscription would allow the customers to view, say, 15 channels including the ABC-CBS-NBC-PBS lineup plus other channels such as CNN or Fox. A higher-tier subscription would add other channels, including ESPN and its associated channels and others such as The Food Channel or assorted movie channels.

To continue reading: ESPN and the Bursting of the Sports Bubble

Monday Morning Quarterback: Hillary Clinton Is To The Election As The Falcons Are To The Super Bowl, by Duane Norman

There were a lot of similarities between this year’s Super Bowl and last year’s election. From Duane Norman at Free Market Shooter, fashooter.com:

Hillary Clinton has emerged from hibernation and found her way back into the news, and she made sure to start off by letting the world know that she took “personal responsibility” for her historic loss to President Trump:

“I take absolute personal responsibility. I was the candidate, I was the person who was on the ballot. I am very aware of the challenges, the problems, the shortfalls that we had,” Clinton said.

But, by now everyone knows that the claim of “personal responsibility” was just a token statement for the blame game that came afterwards.  So, for the first time ever, Free Market Shooter will do a “Monday Morning Quarterback” analysis of Hillary Clinton’s statements, analogizing them to a previously established comparison – the New England Patriots’ comeback win over the Atlanta Falcons in Super Bowl LI.

(Note: this comparison is particularly apt, as Atlanta Falcons owner, Arthur Blank,donated to and supported Hillary Clinton, and New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft, coach Bill Belichick, and quarterback Tom Brady are all known Trump supporters.  In fact, Blank made sure to rib Kraft at the Super Bowl media day for that reason, as seen below.)

Without further ado, let’s start with a comparison that Sean Spicer already made publicly:

“If the election had been on October 27, I would be your president.”

And if the Super Bowl ended in the 4th quarter at the two-minute warning, the Falcons would have won.  But the Falcons let the Patriots tie the game up and take it to overtime, and the election was held on November 8th.  What happened to “playing until the last whistle”, Hillary?

Speaking of “whistles”, who knew Jim Comey was the election referee?

To continue reading: Monday Morning Quarterback: Hillary Clinton Is To The Election As The Falcons Are To The Super Bowl

He Said That? 3/24/17

From noted philosopher and baseball star Reggie Jackson:

Fans don’t boo nobodies.

Things Are Looking Up, by the Zman

One of SLL’s favorite trends, because SLL is a beneficiary of it, is the decline of the mainstream media and the rise of the alternative media. From the Zman on a guest post at theburningplatform.com (by the way, I didn’t watch the Super Bowl):

Like every other normal person in American, I watched the big game on Sunday. This year I was busy with some projects so I did not attend a party. Instead, I planned to get some work done and then settle in at game time. Some people boycott the Super Bowl, believing it makes them virtuous, but those people are idiots. The game is often fun and the ridiculous hype around it is a nice weird American tradition. Plus, having a pseudo holiday the next day means people can have a party on Sunday in the dead of winter.

The thing about the Super Bowl is it is the one event that everyone watches. Even if you don’t follow sports, you watch the game because it is what you do. There are similar events like the Daytona 500 or the Kentucky Derby, but most Americans don’t plan a weekend around those. You watch them if you are home or down at the pub, even though you don’t follow these things closely. The Super Bowl is the one event that everyone talks about the next day, because you know everyone watched it, except for the weirdos.

That’s what makes it a good bellwether for the state of pop culture. For the second year in a row, TV ratings were down for the game, not by a lot, but still down. Now, when an event tends to get close to 100% viewership each year, there is nowhere to go but down, but decline is still decline. When looked at in context of the general decline in TV sports, it suggests we are in the midst of a great change in how people consume their entertainments. That’s the general consensus among the people in charge of television.

To continue reading: Things Are Looking Up