Tag Archives: Robert Mueller

Should Robert Mueller Be Investigated for Violating Civil Liberties? by Alan M. Dershowitz

Criticizing Robert Mueller or his less than perfect record is regarded as heretical. However, as with past investigation, his conduct of the current investigation has been less than exemplary, especially with regard to civil liberties. From Alan M. Dershowitz at gatestoneinstitute.org:

Just as the first casualty of war is truth, so, too, the first casualty of hyper-partisan politics is civil liberties.

Many traditional civil libertarians have allowed their strong anti-Trump sentiments to erase their long-standing commitment to neutral civil liberties. They are now so desperate to get Trump that they are prepared to compromise the most basic due process rights. They forget the lesson of history that such compromises made against one’s enemy are often used as precedents against one’s friends. As Robert Bolt put it in the play and movie A Man for all Seasons:

Roper: So now you would give the Devil benefit of Law!

Thomas Moore: Yes, what would you do? Cut a great road through the law to get after the Devil?

Roper: I’d cut down every law in England to do that?

Thomas Moore: And when the last law was down, and the Devil turned round on you, where would you hide, Roper, the laws all being flat? This country’s planted thick with laws from coast to coast — man’s laws, not God’s — and if you cut them down — and you’re just the man to do it — d’you really think you could stand upright in the winds that would blow then? Yes, I’d give the Devil benefit of law, for my own safety’s sake.

But today’s fair weather civil libertarians are unwilling to give President Trump – who they regard as the devil — the “benefit of law” and civil liberties.

Consider the issue of criticizing Robert Mueller, the Special counsel. Any criticism or even skepticism regarding Mueller’s history is seen as motivated by a desire to help Trump. Mueller was an Assistant US attorney in Boston, the head of its criminal division, the head of the criminal division in Main Justice and the Director of the FBI during the most scandalous miscarriage of justice in the modern history of the FBI. Four innocent people were framed by the FBI in order to protect mass murdering gangsters who were working as FBI informers while they were killing innocent people. An FBI agent, who is now in prison, was tipping off Whitey Bulger as to who might testify against him so that these individuals could be killed. He also tipped off Bulger allowing him to escape and remain on the lam for 16 years.

To continue reading: Should Robert Mueller Be Investigated for Violating Civil Liberties?

 

Advertisements

Talk to Mueller? No, Trump Should Use His Bully Pulpit to Expose Mueller’s Corruption, by Kurt Schlichter

You never win under cross-examination. Trump has nothing to gain by talking to Robert Mueller and much to lose. From Kurt Schlichter at theburningplatform.com:

Talk to Mueller? No, Trump Should Use His Bully Pulpit to Expose Mueller's Corruption

There is no way to sugarcoat it – especially after the lawless invasion of the attorney-client privilege by fancy-suited thugs, if President Donald Trump sits down and talks to Robert Mueller and his pack of Democrat donor corruptocrats, he’s an idiot.

Instead, he needs to take his case to the people – because a blind man can see that he’s being framed.

If Trump talks to Mueller, Mueller will be laughing at him, but on the inside. On the outside, he’ll keep up that beaten beagle visage of his, roaring at how he outsmarted the man who outsmarted all the Smartest People in the World and who therefore assumes he can somehow “win” his interview.

But Trump can’t win. The fix is in. Raiding Michael Cohen’s office was the icing on an all-icing cake. This is not justice. This is an attempt to claw back power for the disenfranchised elite no matter what it takes, and no one – not the president, not me, and not you, should pretend these hacks deserve any deference or respect.

Trump committed no crime, as we all know because nothing indicating he has committed a crime has leaked out of that unprofessional sieve masquerading as a bunch of professional prosecutors that Mueller assembled to do the bidding of his elite masters to both overturn the result of the 2016 election and avenge his humiliated pal James Comey. The recent report that Trump is not the “target” of an investigation should not lull anyone into complacency – it’s just another flurry in this special counsel’s blizzard of lies.

Donald Trump is their target, though they absolutely and unequivocally know he committed no crime. They don’t care.

It’s not the truth that Donald Trump has to worry about. It’s the lies. Mueller and his pack of Hillary hitmen will not hesitate, not for a second, to manufacture a crime if that’s what it takes. Think of them as all being just as honest as fired FBI bigwig Andrew McCabe, then decide if that makes you more or less confident about the process.

Hmmmm. I’ll go with “less.”

To continue reading: Talk to Mueller? No, Trump Should Use His Bully Pulpit to Expose Mueller’s Corruption

 

They Fight the Law and the Law Wins, by Doug “Uncola” Lynn

A corrupt nation veers towards collapse. What happens afterwards? From Doug “Uncola” Lynn at theburningplatform.com:

I saw the tears of the oppressed—

and they have no comforter;

power was on the side of their oppressors….

–  Ecclesiastes 4:1

 

In viewing the daily headlines and reading various online blogs, it appears many of these have converged into discussions on law and rights.  Two examples of ongoing national conversations include mass shootings versus theSecond Amendment and Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s preference for prosecution of process crimes in a bogus election hacking conspiracy, over a real investigation into documented corruption at the highest levels of American government.

On April Fools Day it was revealed the Washington DC permits for the March 24, 2018 “March for Our Lives” event were acquired months before the Parkland Shooting even took place. The irony is palpable.  One would think that would be the smoking gun (pun intended) evidence of a conspiracy, but no.  Nothing shall prevent the children from wielding their emotional wounds, like a Samurai sword in a Tarantino flick, against the Second Amendment; and Laura Ingraham’s right to free speech.

The very next day, on April 2, 2018, Deerfield, Illinois nullified the U.S. Constitution and gave their residents 60 days to turn in their guns or face fines of $1,000 per day per gun.

The day after that, on April 3, 2018, a previously undisclosed memo was unveiled proving illegal collusionbetween Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and his co-conspirator, Robert Mueller, in the special counsel investigation of President Trump.

 

An August 2017 memo from Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein to Special Counsel Robert Mueller surfaced late Monday evening in a court filing. Mueller used the memo to defend his scope of the investigation against a recent motion Manafort filed to dismiss his case.

In the heavily redacted memo, Robert Mueller admits Rosenstein’s order appointing him to Special Counsel was intentionally vague.

‘This violates the special counsel law that requires a specific statement of facts to be investigated’, says Attorney Gregg Jarrett.

So let’s get this straight: Rosenstein, who appointed Mueller to be special counsel, signed off on at least one of the misrepresented, and therefore illegal, FISA applications on Team Trump for a counterintelligence investigation.  His aforementioned August 2, 2017 memo to Mueller is now being used to justify the July 26, 2017 home invasion on Paul Manafort after it happened.  Now Mueller is, instead, investigating Trump for possible obstruction of justice for firing former FBI Director, James Comey.

To continue reading: They Fight the Law and the Law Wins

What Is Robert Mueller Looking For? by Andrew P. Napolitano

Robert Mueller is looking for something that will justify his complete farce of an investigation. From Andrew P. Napolitano at lewrockwell.com:

Robert Mueller is the special counsel appointed by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein in May 2017 to probe the nature and extent of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential campaign. The investigation began in October 2016 under President Barack Obama when the FBI took seriously the boast of Carter Page, one of candidate Donald Trump’s foreign policy advisers, that he had worked for the Kremlin.

The FBI also had transcripts of telephone conversations and copies of emails and text messages of Trump campaign personnel that had been supplied to it by British intelligence. Connecting the dots, the FBI persuaded a judge on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to issue a search warrant for the surveillance of Page, an American.

Page never registered as a foreign agent, and working for the Kremlin and not registering as a foreign agent is a crime for which the FBI should have investigated Page. Such an investigation would have included surveillance, but not from the FISA court. Surveillance in a criminal case requires a search warrant from a U.S. District Court based upon the constitutional requirement of probable cause of crime — meaning that it is more likely than not that the thing to be searched (internet and telephone communications) will produce evidence of criminal behavior.

But the FBI didn’t seek that. Instead, it sought a warrant to surveil Page’s communications based on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act standard, which is probable cause of communicating with a foreign power. This lower, easier-to-demonstrate and unconstitutional standard is the tool of choice these days for FBI agents because it requires less effort and is used in a court that grants 99.9 percent of search warrant applications.

The temptation to use the FISA court and its easy standard instead of a U.S. District Court and its privacy-recognizing constitutional standard to get a search warrant is often too much for the FBI to resist. This is a form of corruption because it presents a path for criminal investigators to invade the privacy of Americans that the Constitution protects.

To continue reading: What Is Robert Mueller Looking For?

The Unspooling, by Howard Kunstler

It’s a joy to watch big lies unravel. From Howard Kunstler at kunstler.com:

With spring, things come unstuck; an unspooling has begun. The turnaround at the FBI and Department of Justice has been so swift that even The New York Times has shut up about collusion with Russia — at the same time omitting to report what appears to have been a wholly politicized FBI upper echelon intruding on the 2016 election campaign, and then laboring stealthily to un-do the election result.

The ominous silence enveloping the DOJ the week after Andrew McCabe’s firing — and before the release of the FBI Inspector General’s report — suggests to me that a grand jury is about to convene and indictments are in process, not necessarily from Special Prosecutor Robert Mueller’s office. The evidence already publicly-aired about FBI machinations and interventions on behalf of Hillary Clinton and against Donald Trump looks bad from any angle, and the wonder was that it took so long for anyone at the agency to answer for it.

McCabe is gone from office and, apparently hung out to dry on the recommendation of his own colleagues. Do not think for a moment that he will just ride off into the sunset. Meanwhile, Peter Strzok, Lisa Page, Bruce Ohr, have been sent to the FBI study hall pending some other shoes dropping in a grand jury room. James Comey is out hustling a book he slapped together to manage the optics of his own legal predicament (evidently, lying to a congressional committee). And way out in orbit beyond the gravitation of the FBI, lurk those two other scoundrels, John Brennan, former head of the CIA (now a CNN blabbermouth), and James Clapper, former Director of National Intelligence, a new and redundant post in the Deep State’s intel matrix (and ditto a CNN blabbermouth). Brennan especially has been provoked to issue blunt Twitter threats against Mr. Trump, suggesting he might be entering a legal squeeze himself.

None of these public servants have cut a plea bargain yet, as far as is publicly known, but they are all, for sure, in a lot of trouble. Culpability may not stop with them. Tendrils of evidence point to a coordinated campaign that included the Obama White House and the Democratic National Committee starring Hillary Clinton. Robert Mueller even comes into the picture both at the Uranium One end of the story and the other end concerning the activities of his old friend, Mr. Comey. Most tellingly of all, Attorney General Jeff Sessions was not shoved out of office but remains shrouded in silence and mystery as this melodrama plays out, tick, tick, tick.

To continue reading: The Unspooling

As Russian Bot Narrative Unravels, Even Liberals Say Enough Is Enough, by Tyler Durden

The Russian bot story is now as discredited as the Russian hack story. From Tyler Durden at zerohedge.com:

It appears that the world’s biggest strawman is ablaze, and those who continue to cling to the rapidly dissolving “evil Russians” narrative to explain away everything from Hillary Clinton’s loss to conservative support for political issues are looking increasingly foolish in light of recent developments.

Even former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice thinks the Russia investigation needs to be wrapped up:

Keep in mind, there are two stories at play here; the first of course is the “Russian hacking” narrative – which posits that Russia wanted Hillary Clinton to lose the election, so they hacked the email accounts of key Democrats and the DNC and then gave them to WikiLeaks – possibly in coordination with the Trump campaign (an assertion which has more or less been lopped off the theory lately due to a lack of evidence). The second push has been the “Russian troll” narrative – which revolves around the theory that Americans were influenced by Russians purchasing ads and using “bots” on social media platforms – fake accounts which use automated systems to deliver a message or push a hashtag so that it goes viral.

And while Special Counsel Robert Mueller is rumored to be preparing fresh indictments for the Russian hacking group fingered by the largely discredited cybersecurity firm Crowdstrike – the Special Counsel’s case isn’t going to hold water unless he can explain how files can be transferred from the East Coast to Russia at 22.6 MB/s – a speed virtually impossible to achieve from halfway around the world – yet very common for a thumb drive.

With claims of Russian meddling already on shaky ground – the absurd notion that the Kremlin was able to swing the election jumped the shark last month following Robert Mueller’s indictment of 13 Russian nationals at a “troll farm.” The official takeaway; those dastardly Russians, with no connection to the Trump campaign, were running a tiny propaganda shop (which had been in operation for years) that had no effect on the outcome of the U.S. election.

The icing on the cake had to be CNN literally dumpster diving in St. Petersburg, Russia outside the “troll farm” in search of hard evidence Mueller’s team must have overlooked.

To continue reading: As Russian Bot Narrative Unravels, Even Liberals Say Enough Is Enough

The Exponent Problem, by Robert Gore

2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, 1024, 2048, 4096, 8192…

Most people find managing their own affairs sufficiently challenging. Earning a living, establishing a family, rearing children, saving for college and retirement, and dealing with illness and aging fill the days and leave little time, attention, or energy to manage someone else’s affairs.

A hypothesis: the effort required to run other people’s lives is an exponential function. If X is the sum total of everything required to run your life; running two lives is X squared; three lives is X cubed, and so on. Call it the exponent problem. For partial verification, try running someone else’s life for a day or two. See it how it works out for you and the other person.

Why do governments fail? Government is someone imposing rules on someone else, and backing them up with repression, fraud, and violence when necessary. The governed always outnumber those governing, which means the latter face the exponent problem. In the US, there are around 22 million employed by the government, and let’s add in another million who actively influence it. The US population is around 323 million, so there are 23 million rulers to 300 million ruled, or about 13 ruled per ruler. How fitting, like the 13 original colonies!

Whatever amount X of time, energy, money, attention, and other resources the rulers expend on their own lives, they must expend that X to the thirteenth power to “govern” the ruled. If X could actually be quantified and it was only 2, it would still take 8192 times the effort to rule the US as it does for the rulers to govern their own lives. Those are just illustrative numbers, but you get the picture.

No wonder rulers use repression, fraud, and violence. They’re overwhelmed by the exponent problem. On its best days governance is a comic proposition, on its worst, a tragic and terrible one. A farce, but in its own way tragic and terrible, is preceding the ultimately tragic and terrible outcome of the US government’s efforts to govern every aspect of its constituents’ lives and exercise power over what it considers its global domain.

Robert Mueller’s Russian indictments scream Keystone investigation. The indictments of out-of-reach Russians are a tacit admission that Mueller has nothing on the Trump campaign’s alleged collusion with Russia. They are a laughable attempt to divert attention from evident criminality by the Clintons, their foundation, Barack Obama, and members of the Department of Justice, the State Department, the FBI and the intelligence community both before and after Trump’s victory. There are Russian angles to that apparent criminality, which Mueller has shown little willingness to investigate.

Such blatant ineptitude and corruption are to be expected from people who think they can run other people’s lives. The delusion is almost universal, a toxic cognitive cloud that has persisted throughout history and has spread over the entire planet.

The ruled usually know when their rulers are inept and corrupt. However, they often believe that somewhere else the wise and sagacious effectively govern. In the 1930s and 40s, many in Europe and America gushed over Hitler, Mussolini, and Stalin. In the 1980’s, the Japanese had the secret sauce. Liberals have long hailed Scandinavia as utopian governance.

Across the alternative media, articles extoll Russian and Chinese leadership, particularly their joint leadership of the new Silk Road, the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI). SLL has reposted some of them. Directed by Russian and Chinese bureaucrats and politicians—surely wiser and less corrupt than our own—the BRI will build transportation and communications infrastructure across Asia, the Middle East, and Europe. The Maritime Silk Road will build Indian Ocean shipping facilities.

The US government does not see this in a benign light. It’s an attempt by the our geopolitical rivals to rule Halford MacKinder’s center of the world, (see “Washington’s Great Game and Why It’s Failing,”  SLL, 6/8/15) and we can’t have that. The Eurasian land mass contains much of the world’s population, raw materials, and oil. Vital US interests are at stake. So are vital Russian and Chinese interests.

Oddly enough, the contest for the center of the world has coalesced in Syria, a country about the size of Washington state. The US, Russia, China, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Israel, Iraq, Iran, Jordan, Qatar, Kuwait, France, and the United Kingdom, various tribal and ethnic groups, various Islamic guerrilla groups, and the government of Syria itself have all declared interests in that nation. It doesn’t even have that much oil. The situation has its darkly comic aspects and at least one satire, Prime Deceit by yours truly, has been written about it.

The situation also has its tragic and terrifying realities. On this small patch much blood has been spilled, much treasure has disappeared, and Syrian lives have been ended or upended as “interested parties” try to impose their versions of control on all or part of it. They run into the exponent problem, usually compounded by the would-be controlled’s violent resistance to the would-be controllers.

Syria is a microcosm of what analyst Richard Maybury labels Chaostan: “The area from the Arctic Ocean to the Indian Ocean, and Poland to the Pacific, plus north Africa.” An investment in Maybury’s newsletter, Early Warning Report, may be the best investment you’ll ever make. Anybody who’s followed its recommendations since its inception in 1991 has made a fortune. “Chaostan,” Maybury notes, “contains thousands of nations, tribes and ethnic groups who have hated and fought each other for centuries.” They don’t take too well to outsiders, either.

Attempts to impose order, be it US-style order or the Russian-Chinese-BRI version, confront that history and the exponent problem. We haven’t even mentioned the other exponent problem, compounding interest on the world’s mammoth and growing debt load. Imposing order takes money. Good luck, everyone, with Chaostan.

The question is not whether efforts to impose order in Chaostan will crash and burn—they will—but how low they will take humanity. Destruction of the species is a nontrivial possibility. At present, not one person in the motley coterie that governs this planet appears to understand that control is mathematically impossible. Of course, when impossible butters your bread you embrace it, and this quixotic quest for control butters a lot of bread. Just the world’s military and intelligence spending sums to trillions of dollars.

The exponent problem yields a testable hypothesis: present efforts at control, much less expanded efforts like global governance, will require increasingly unattainable amounts of energy and resources and will collapse. Another hypothesis: a system that would adapt itself to available energy and resources is the one which allows individuals to direct their own lives, i.e., freedom. There is a nontrivial possibility that hypothesis may get a test, too, but only after the first hypothesis has been confirmed.

You Should Be Laughing At Them!

Get The Amazon Paperback

Get the Kindle eBook