Category Archives: Education

Prof: SpongeBob perpetuates ‘violent, racist’ acts against indigenous people, by Celine Ryan

SpongeBob SquarePants poses a clear and present danger to society, especially the children, and must be expunged (pun intended). From Celine Ryan at campusreform.org:

  • A professor at the University of Washington recently published an article in an academic journal about the children’s cartoon “SpongeBob SquarePants,” claiming it perpetuates a legacy of violence against the indigenous people of the Pacific.

The professor argues that the cartoon is involved in the “occupation” of native lands, and that the show participates in “cultural appropriation” by way of its island motif.

A university professor deemed the beloved cartoon “SpongeBob Squarepants” “violent,” “racist,” and “insidious” in a scholarly article.

University of Washington professor Holly Barker published her musings on the yellow sponge cartoon character and his deep-sea pals in an academic journal called The Contemporary Pacific: A Journal of Island Affairs, which features “readable” articles focused on “social, economic, political, ecological, and cultural topics.”

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Why a Free College Education Will Lead to Ruination of America, by Bill Sardi

A free-to-the-student education, paid for by the government, will have very little value. From Bill Sardi at lewrockwell.com:

Free college education is now being handed out to high school graduates and will lead to the ruination of many unwary young Americans.

Here is what happens when higher education becomes commoditized:

1. More people compete for jobs that require college degrees. Greater supply and no increased demand means those graduates who do obtain jobs in their field will be paid less. With more graduates than job openings, these students who momentarily wore a cap and gown in a proud graduation ceremony may end up doing menial labor, like the women who clean my home or the waiters at a restaurant I frequent.  Labor is still subject to supply and demand.  It may be tough to graduate in engineering, but too many engineers and their earning power erodes.  There are 117,553 graduates with an engineering degree entering the job market each year.  Colleges do no counseling to inform students that the career field they have chosen may have a limited number of job openings.  This borders on fraud.

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No Child Left Behind, by Kim Wong-Shing

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Feelings Now Acceptable As Answers To Math Problems, from The Babylon Bee

WASHINGTON, D.C.—An update issued Tuesday to the 2017–2018 Common Core educational standards now allows students to answer mathematics problems by responding with whatever their feelings are telling them at the time.

One example problem given to illustrate the updated standards asked students to figure out when a 6:00 a.m. train leaving Boston at thirty miles per hour and a 7:00 a.m. Milwaukee train headed the opposite direction at forty miles per hour will intersect. A list of possible solutions to the sample problem published in the Common Core standards obtained by reporters indicated that “Ugh,” “I’m offended,” “Triggered,” “Trains scare me,” “Boston scares me,” “Milwaukee scares me,” and “Kill yourself,” would all be scored as correct.

“Any emotion, feeling, statement, or catchphrase is an acceptable answer to most of the problems in the new mathematics standards,” a Common Core representative told reporters. “As long as students are being sincere, genuine, authentic, and true to themselves at the time they are answering the question, that’s all we can ask as educators.”

“Who are we to tell anyone that their own mathematical truth is wrong?” the rep added.

According to the rep, the Common Core standards will be updated next year to include feelings as acceptable responses to any and all questions pertaining to biology, chemistry, grammar, and history, while sources claim that English literature teachers have already been accepting emotions as responses for years.

No Motherhood, No People, by Paul Craig Roberts

A culture that doesn’t reproduce dies. From Paul Craig Roberts at paulcraigroberts.com:

It is paradoxical that feminism together with other ideological movements has destroyed the natural feminism of women and turned them into sexual items. The 19-year old who intends to get her tubes tied is turning herself into a pure sexual commodity ( https://www.spiked-online.com/2019/08/02/the-turn-against-motherhood/ ). That women are transitioning themselves into sex dolls is a paradoxical result after decades of feminist propaganda that reduced the sexual relationship between men and women from a loving relationship to “men’s use of women’s bodies.” The feminists have now achieved what they decried.

Feminism has not liberated women.  It has liberated women from woman’s role.  The kind of stable committed relationships that men and women formerly had are difficult to find today except in the oldest generation.

As The Saker recently wrote, we are experiencing “the gradual irrelevance of an entire civilization,” one that has been emptied of its history, foundational purpose, integrity, spirituality, and moral conscience.  It is doubtful after decades of anti-male propaganda that the relationship between men and women can be restored.  Thus has the family been undermined.  White ethnicities are disappearing from earth as the birth rate is less than the death rate, and 19-year old women are having their tubes tied.

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The Student-Loan Fiasco: I’m Going to Wade into the Debate, But with my Boots On, by Wolf Richter

Student loans for higher education has become a very profitable racket. From Wolf Richter at wolfstreet.com:

The University-Corporate-Financial Complex is going to squeal.

OK, I’m going to wade into this debate. And I’m going to do it with my boots on.

The student loan fiasco – the pile of debt that has ballooned to $1.6 trillion – and what to do about it – particularly how much of that student debt to forgive at the expense of taxpayers – has now entered the list of presidential campaign promises.

These promises of student-loan forgiveness are efforts to buy votes at the expense of the rest of the taxpayers, whose money this is, on the principle that whoever proposes the biggest debt-forgiveness will get the most votes from those graduates and their parents.

I can’t blame them. It’s just too juicy a low-hanging fruit. If I were a politician running for office, I’d promise the same damn thing, and that’s why I’m not running for office.

But this $1.6 trillion is an asset on the government’s books. It was funded by tax receipts and debt that the government issued. If hypothetically, all students paid off their federal student loans today, the gross national debt would drop by 7%, from $22.5 trillion to $20.9 trillion.

Forgiving these student loans wipes out that asset, but the national debt that funded these student loans remains. That’s how that would work. There are no freebies, when it comes to debt.

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Better Schools, by John Stossel

If you like a service in the private market, the market will probably provide more of it. If you like something the government provides, it may well shut the service down. From John Stossel at townhall.com:

Better Schools

With most services, you get to shop around, but rarely can you do that with government-run schools.

Philadelphia mom Elaine Wells was upset to learn that there were fights every day in the school her son attended. So she walked him over to another school.

“We went to go enroll and we were told, ‘He can’t go here!’ That was my wake up call,” Wells tell me in my latest video.

She entered her sons in a charter school lottery, hoping to get them into a charter school.

“You’re on pins and needles, hoping and praying,” she said. But politicians stack the odds against kids who want to escape government-run schools. Philly rejected 75% of the applicants.

Wells’ kids did eventually manage to get into a charter called Boys’ Latin. I’m happy for them. I wish government bureaucrats would let all kids have similar chances.

Wells was so eager for her sons to attend that she arranged to have one repeat the sixth grade.

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