Tag Archives: Biden administration

The Important Thing Is No Mean Tweets, by Kurt Schlichter

Thank goodness we’ve replaced mean old Donald Trump with gentle, avuncular Joe Biden. From Kurt Schlichter at theburningplatform.com:

The Important Thing Is No Mean Tweets

Americans are a spoiled people who do not understand just how good they have it – sure, the economy is tanking, our kids are locked out of school, and President Badfinger is handing the Chi Coms our country on a platter, but that ignores the big picture.

There are no more mean tweets.

Donald Trump has been successfully banished by means of the most honest and legitimate election ever, according to important and smart people who would never lie to you and who have zero personal interest in reinforcing the power and position of their garbage Establishment. Gone along with him, thanks to the brave help of the social media overlords, is his ability to tweet. No more mean tweets people – think of it! Savor it. And forget everything else that is going on.

You know, there have been legendary epochs in human history before now where everything changed for the better. The Age of Pericles. The Pax Romana. The Renaissance. The Obama years. And now joining these fabled eras, is the era of No Mean Tweets.

What a time to be alive!

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Biden: No New Cold Wars or Democracy Crusades, by Pat Buchanan

Biden says he just wants the US to get along with the world, which won’t play well with the neocons and neoliberals in his administration. Meanwhile, the American people are concerned with a plethora of problems here at home. From Patrick Buchanan at buchanan.org:

“What is America’s mission?” is a question that has been debated since George Washington’s Farewell Address in 1797.

At last week’s Munich Security Conference, President Joe Biden laid out his vision as to what is America’s mission. And the contrast with the mission enunciated by George W. Bush in his second inaugural could not have been more defining or dramatic.

Here is Bush, Jan. 20, 2005:

“From the day of our Founding, we have proclaimed that every man and woman on this earth has rights, and dignity, and matchless value, because they bear the image of the Maker of Heaven and earth…

“Advancing these ideals is the mission that created our Nation… Now it is… the calling of our time.”

“So it is the policy of the United States to seek and support the growth of democratic movements and institutions in every nation and culture, with the ultimate goal of ending tyranny in our world.”

America’s mission is “ending tyranny in our world,” said Bush.

Biden’s declared mission is far less ambitious.

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The ‘Transition’ of the Élites, by Alastair Crooke

The neocons who hated Trump have been warmly embraced by the Biden administration. From Alastair Crooke at strategic-culture.org:

The neo-cons were for ever knifing Trump in the back. They’ve now gone to Biden, Alastair Crooke writes.

Rep. Jamie Raskin wrapped up the impeachment managers’ case for convicting Donald Trump by citing a 1776 passage by Tom Paine: “Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered, but we have this saving consolation: the more difficult the struggle, the more glorious in the end – will be our victory”. Light and dark. Good and evil – and so the essence of the ‘show trial’ stands revealed. It is one of extravagant theatre – touching on the Manichean through using edited clips from TV to present a drama consisting of, on the one hand, legitimacy and power, versus, on the other, Trump and his supporters as – not just ‘enemies’ – but ‘tyrants out of hell’.

The question ultimately is: Did it succeed? Was the ‘guilty party’ cowed by the majestic dramaturgy of the show trial, and fearful of a coming domestic Patriot Act ? Did it guarantee a long era of one-party’s rule?

At one level, it failed. Reports suggest that Sen. McConnell (perhaps reflecting his own emotional reaction to the 6 January), had assured the Democratic leadership of a much bigger contingent of Republican senators prepared to vote to convict. In the end, only seven did.

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Robert Kagan Diagnosed America’s Biggest Problem: Americans Who Don’t Want To Run the World, by Doug Bandow

What do you do when you’re a committed imperialist but most of your country is not? From Doug Bandow at antiwar.com:

“All great powers” want to rule the world, declared Robert Kagan, propagandist for America as imperial power, democratic hegemon, aggressive unipower, and perpetual war machine. However, they typically fail. Wrote Kagan in a new Foreign Affairs article: “Much of the drama of the past century resulted from great powers whose aspirations exceeded their capacity.”

The U.S. has a different problem, he contended. The American people. Rather than realize their unique calling to sacrifice themselves and obey their betters when instructed to patrol the globe, they continued to look inward.

They failed to realize that their destiny is to impose order upon independent and subservient, judge innocent and guilty, wage war upon great and small, and, yes, kill anyone who and destroy anything which gets in the way of fulfilling this sacred duty. Instead of focusing on the wishes of Washington, D.C., the world’s imperial city, and rising to the greatness expected of them by supporting the aggrandizements of a globally dominant America, they focused on the local and personal – their careers and educations, their communities and towns, their clubs and associations, and their families and friends.

Yes, he admitted, “they have met the challenges of Nazism and Japanese imperialism, Soviet communism, and radical Islamist terrorism.” However, they saw these efforts as “exceptional responses to exceptional circumstances. They do not see themselves as the primary defender of a certain kind of world order; they have never embraced that ‘indispensable’ role.”

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Biden Announces Ambitious Goal Of $100 Per Gallon Gas By End Of First 100 Days In Office

From The Babylon Bee:

WASHINGTON, D.C.—In spite of Democrats’ best efforts to curb the use of fossil fuels, stubborn Americans continue to use them to power their automobiles and heat their homes. Biden is responding to this crisis with an ambitious new plan to raise the price of gas to $100 per gallon by the end of his first 100 days in office.

“Listen– all these fossil fuels, they gotta stop! Gotta stop!” Biden said to the Secret Service agent pumping gas into his presidential limo. “We gotta do something about these selfish Americans and one-horse kangaroo herders burning all these fuels without consequences. I know consequences. Just ask Corn Pop and his buddies. When I’m done with ’em, these Americans will never burn a gallon of gas again, Jack!”

The administration has announced the “Gas Prices To The Mooooon” campaign– a series of executive orders designed to drive the price of fuel up to make it unattainable to anyone except John Kerry.

When confronted with the question of how Americans will afford to get around with $100-per-gallon gas, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi suggested they stay home and eat some ice cream instead.

Currently, the average price stands at $2.53 per gallon and rising, which experts say is likely Trump’s fault.

Is Biden Prepared to Lose Afghanistan? by Patrick J. Buchanan

Two questions that never seem to get asked about Afghanistan: who profits from the drug trade there, and who protects it? From Patrick J. Buchanan at buchanan.org:

Is President Joe Biden prepared to preside over the worst U.S. strategic defeat since the fall of Saigon in 1975?

For that may be what’s at stake if Biden follows through on the 2020 peace deal with the Taliban to withdraw all U.S. forces from Afghanistan by May 1 — just two months from now.

Consider. If the 2,500 American troops remaining in Afghanistan are pulled out, the entire 10,000-troop NATO contingent departs.

This would write an end to the Western military commitment.

And the likelihood the Kabul government could then survive the constant and increasing attacks from the Taliban, as the latter now control half of the country and many roads leading to the capital, is slim.

After all, an Afghan army that could not defeat the Taliban a decade ago, when 100,000 U.S. troops were fighting alongside it, is not going to rout the Taliban after the Americans have gone home.

In short, if Biden does not breach the terms of the deal the Taliban and U.S. signed last year and keep our troops there, he would be inviting a repeat of Saigon ’75, with all that would mean for the Afghans who cast their lot with us.

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Biden’s Post-Trump NATO Reset Points to Failing U.S. Global Power in Multipolar World, by the Strategic Culture Editorial Board

TThe American empire has been declining through several presidencies, Biden may preside over its fall. From the Strategic Culture Editorial Board at strategic-culture.org:

The more the US pushes NATO as its vehicle, the more it is apparent that the battery of American power is running flat.

A month after his inauguration, President Joe Biden’s administration formally engaged on the international stage this week to set out key foreign policies.

His Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin addressed a two-day NATO summit via video link in which he relayed the message from Biden that the US would re-engage with transatlantic European allies. Four years of Donald Trump’s abrasive America First policy was being jettisoned in place of a more smooth, consensual approach under Biden.

President Biden would himself  address videoconferences of the Group of Seven nations held Friday, as well as the annual Munich Security Conference over the weekend. A major development is the Biden administration’s announcement that it is ready to rejoin the international nuclear accord with Iran, thereby repudiating Trump’s rejection of that deal. It remains to be seen, however, just what the Biden administration will want in exchange for honoring its signature to the treaty which was negotiated in 2015.

Other policy reversals include US troops remaining in Germany in contrast to Trump’s plan to draw down numbers. That sounds like another exercise in repairing relations with the Europeans.

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Is Biden Committing Diplomatic Suicide Over the Iran Nuclear Agreement? by Medea Benjamin and Nicholas J.S. Davies

Iran is not going to give Biden the deal they wouldn’t give Trump: renegotiation of the Nuclear Agreement. From Medea Benjamin and Nicholas J.S. Davies at antiwar.com:

As Congress still struggles to pass a COVID relief bill, the rest of the world is nervously reserving judgment on America’s new president and his foreign policy, after successive U.S. administrations have delivered unexpected and damaging shocks to the world and the international system.

Cautious international optimism toward Biden is very much based on his commitment to Obama’s signature diplomatic achievement, the JCPOA or nuclear agreement with Iran. Biden and the Democrats excoriated Trump for withdrawing from it and promised to promptly rejoin the deal if elected. But Biden now appears to be hedging his position in a way that risks turning what should be an easy win for the new administration into an avoidable and tragic diplomatic failure.

While it was the United States under Trump that withdrew from the nuclear agreement, Biden is taking the position that the US will not rejoin the agreement or drop its unilateral sanctions until Iran first comes back into compliance. After withdrawing from the agreement, the United States is in no position to make such demands, and Foreign Minister Zarif has clearly and eloquently rejected them, reiterating Iran’s firm commitment that it will return to full compliance as soon as the United States does so.

Biden should have announced US re-entry as one of his first executive orders. It did not require renegotiation or debate. On the campaign trail, Bernie Sanders, Biden’s main competitor for the Democratic nomination, simply promised, “I would re-enter the agreement on the first day of my presidency.”

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New American Regime = Exact Same Challenges for Russia, by Tim Kirby

The Russian government’s relationship with the US government will be no better under Biden than it was under Trump, and it may be worse. What may change is that they’ll simply give up thinking what the US or the rest of the West thinks of it. From Tim Kirby at strategic-culture.org:

The next 8 years will be a time for Russia to look inwards in order to project outwards, Tim Kirby writes.

As a country that has seen total systemic collapse twice during the 20th century, Russia was watching the leadup to the U.S. presidential inauguration with just as much anticipation as the most ardent Trump/Biden supporters and fervent conspiracy theorists. It looked from Moscow, like Trump, after having been blatantly cheated out of the presidency, might just decide to flip the rigged game table over consequences be damned. Whatever chaos would ensue from such a move would surely give the Russians the freedom they’ve been dreaming of (via distraction) from Washington’s omnipresent gaze and Soft Power vice grip. But this did not occur. Trump’s cryptic language and social media hinting amounted to nothing as he willingly accepted losing the election that he won.

And so the big question being discussed in Russia is… “what’s next?”. So let’s break down what the near future is going to look like and how a theoretically sovereign Russia should respond to these challenges presented by a Joe Biden White House.

Context: Trump’s legacy will be actively erased but how does that affect Russia?

The period in American history that Trump oversaw, if viewed objectively, was an attempt to make a titanic shift in policy, economy and mentality in America that failed. Why it failed is not important, but what is important is to acknowledge all of the achievements or new foundations that he laid in office are already being deleted by the new old Establishment.

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Same as the Old Boss, Julian Assange Edition, by Thomas Knapp

It looks like Biden will pick up most of Trump’s bad policies, including the prosecution of Julian Assange. From Thomas Knapp at antiwar.com:

On February 9, the US Justice Department announced that US President Joe Biden, as in so many other areas, intends to serve Donald Trump’s second term when it comes to persecuting heroes guilty of exposing US war crimes and embarrassing American politicians.

As Trump’s presidency drew to an end, some activists held out hope that he’d pardon political prisoner Julian Assange, whose incarceration at the hands of the Swedish, British, and US governments has, according to the UN’s Working Group on Arbitrary Detention, gone on for more than a decade now (between British prisons and de facto house arrest in Ecuador’s London embassy). No dice. Trump handed out plenty of pardons to political cronies, but left Assange in stir.

In January, British judge Vanessa Baraitser declined to extradite the founder of WikiLeaks to the US on trumped up (pun intended) espionage charges. Not because the charges are clearly nonsense, though they are. Nor because neither Assange’s person or his alleged actions were subject to US jurisdiction, though they weren’t. She denied the extradition because she (probably correctly) considers Assange a suicide risk if he’s handed over.

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