Tag Archives: American dissolution

Doug Casey’s Next 5 Shocking Predictions…

In short order the world is going to be dramatically different. Perhaps the biggest question is will it be dramatically freer or dramatically more repressive. From Doug Casey at internationalman.com:

biggest predictions

Editor’s Note: The 2020s are shaping up to be a volatile time on multiple fronts. Globally, the Covid-19 pandemic has ushered in the most extreme government controls in history. Censorship is growing rapidly in the West. Economically, the US government has proven that the US dollar is no better than any other fiat currency, and the geopolitical chess pieces are changing to reflect China’s formidable role in the next decade.

Today, legendary speculator and contrarian thinker Doug Casey shares his biggest predictions for what is coming next and what it means for you, your money, and personal freedom around the world.

International Man: Big Tech’s censorship of alternative voices has been on the rise in the US, Canada, and other places.

What do you think the role of Big Tech companies will be?

Doug Casey: Trends in motion tend to stay in motion until they reach a climax, a crisis, at which point anything can happen.

We’re headed for a gigantic world crisis. My guess is that the long-standing trend towards Big Tech getting bigger and more powerful won’t continue—in other words, Big Tech is in the same position that Big Oil was in 1980. It looked like they were going to take over the world. Oil stocks were over 30% of the S&P 500, but today, they’re under 3%.

Big business in general, and now Big Tech in particular, have always had a very cozy relationship with big government—and big government likes that. The two of them fit together like a hand in glove. Big government funnels contracts to Big Tech, and Big Tech acts as the State’s handmaiden.

It’s part of why the average guy has lost faith in government, corporations, and our institutions. They’re now losing faith in the money as inflation rises. When the stock market crashes, they’re going to lose faith in the financial markets.

Massive societal change is looming. But that doesn’t mean the cultures of either Big Tech companies or the government are going to change. Why? Because throughout society, the elite are overwhelmingly statist and collectivist oriented. They’re quite comfortable and don’t want to rock the boat.

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Got Ammo? by Southern Sage

It’s all heading toward wide scale violence. From Southern Sage at theburningplatform.com:

For years I have been skeptical – to say the least – about the globalist conspiracy theories. No longer. These evil bastards really do exist and they really are working together to implement their crackpot ideas. It reminds me of the late 19th and early 20th century, the so-called Gilded Age, when many Americans began to suspect that the side that won the Civil War was controlled by a greedy, grasping, amoral, corrupt gang of early “Masters of the Universe”, who used their money to buy Congress and turn the laws to their advantage.

The suckers were the decent, hard-working Americans who still believed the USA was the country put together by Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Franklin and the rest; many of them had fought to preserve that country and were enraged to find that they had been snookered. Of course, Southerners had already figured it out the hard way. There were populist uprising across the country that, while “mostly peaceful”, included quite a bit of non-peaceful activity, such as the Homestead strike when furious workers killed or beat the living shit out of the hired mercenaries of Andrew Carnegie and his henchmen.

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2020: A Retrospective From 2025, by Tom Trenchard

The differences between the two main factions in America are irreconcilable. From Tom Trenchard at americanmind.org:

countymappurple1024

Donald Trump and the Altogether True and Amazing Origin of the United American Counties.

2020 marked an epoch in American history, standing alongside 1865, 1787, and 1776. First there was the COVID-19 pandemic, then there were the racial protests and riots throughout the summer, and then there was the disputed presidential election. Finally and most cataclysmically, though, 2020 witnessed the initial formation of the United American Counties (UACo) within the former United States of America. Five years later, it is only now becoming possible to assess the most important causes and consequences of this momentous development for American political society.

As with most politically revolutionary events, the Declaration of UACo Independence was almost entirely unforeseen before it occurred, but almost inevitable in hindsight. By the early 2010s two things were clear: (1) Americans had become increasingly polarized in their worldviews and political beliefs; and (2) These polarized halves of the U.S. were increasingly sorting themselves into either urban or suburban/rural areas. Trump’s election in 2016 put a spotlight on these political realities; as Trump frequently boasted, the 2016 electoral map looked like a sea of red surrounding islands of blue. In 2020, that situation was essentially unchanged.

97% of land area in the U.S. constituted rural counties. Trump’s support within these counties was high and enthusiastic both in 2016 and 2020. Within the remaining 3% of the geographical U.S.—the big cities—anti-Trump sentiment was equally high and enthusiastic.

The 2020 election was the perfect storm for a confrontation between these two factions. It looked like Trump was winning on election day, and then the mail-in ballots handed an apparent victory to Biden. Although widespread electoral fraud wasn’t uncovered by the protracted legal investigation that followed, the die had been cast. Trump and his supporters thought the election had been stolen, and that Trump was the legitimate president of the U.S.

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What Will It Take for Americans to Consider Breaking Up? by Jeff Deist

The United States is no longer in any sense united. A divorce is way past due. From Jeff Deist at mises.org:

It’s one thing for mass democracy to produce bad results, in the form of elected politicians or enacted policies. It’s another when the democratic process itself breaks down because nobody trusts the vote or the people who count it. But that’s precisely where we are.

As things stand at this writing, last night’s presidential election remains undecided and looking ugly. At least six states are still uncalled, and both the Trump and Biden camps have their legal teams claiming victory. We may be in for days, weeks, or even months of legal skirmishes, all of which can only add to our intense political (or more accurately cultural) breakdown.

Today, perhaps 140 million American voters are in purgatory, fearfully wondering what will happen to them if the other guy wins. This is nothing short of a national psychosis, absurd yet deadly real. And it gets worse every four years, despite the narrowing of any “policy” differences between the two parties over recent decades. If anything, presidential votes are overwhelmingly about tribal affiliations with our kind of person, not substantive ideology.

Yes, this is unhealthy. And yes, the psychosis manifests because the stakes are so high. It manifests because government is far too big and rapacious; lawmaking and jurisprudence too centralized in DC; the unitary executive presidency too powerful; and society too politicized. But these are unhelpful truisms. Plenty of Americans abjectly support more government, more centralized political power, an omnipotent president and Supreme Court, and the sharp politicization of every facet of life.

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