Tag Archives: electric cars

Doug Casey on Electric and Self-Driving Vehicles, Part I

Doug Casey is more bullish on electric and self-driving cars than Eric Peters. From Casey at caseyresearch.com:

Chris’ note: We’re in the middle of a revolutionary trend…

As we’ve been showing you, the car industry is rapidly changing because of two growing technologies: electric vehicles (EVs) and self-driving cars.

EVs aren’t like traditional vehicles. They run on electricity instead of gasoline or diesel.

Not long ago, just a few hundred of these vehicles existed. Now, there are nearly 5.1 million EVs on the roads… and that number grows by the day.

And self-driving cars are only becoming more popular as well. By next year, estimates say there’ll be 10 million self-driving cars in use.

In short, these technologies are the future. Even our founder, Doug Casey, thinks so. And when Doug gets excited about something, I get him on the phone to find out why.

Read on to see what Doug has to say about this megatrend… and don’t miss tomorrow’s Dispatch, when Doug and I finish this important discussion…


Chris: Doug, you’ve mentioned how electric vehicles [EVs] will become a huge deal. What makes you say that?

Doug: There’s no doubt that electric vehicles are going to put an end to the internal combustion engine [ICE]. I want to not only explain why – but some related changes that are much bigger, that almost nobody has thought about.

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Another Way EVs Will Cost Us, by Eric Peters

Electric car production will probably cost a lot of auto workers their jobs. From Eric Peters at ericpetersautos.com:

Lost in the fatuous fake news juggernaut about the supposed misdeeds of the relentlessly besieged Orange Man has been real – and important news – about the longest nationwide strike by autoworkers in almost 50 years.

The target of the strike is General Motors. The United Auto Workers haven’t been working since September 16. Almost all GM plants have been idled since then, with the exception of the truck plant in Silao, Mexico. But a shortage of parts caused by the idling of the plants north of the border will almost certainly cause the truck plant to go silent soon, too.

The closures are costing GM about $25 million per day in lost profit, according to analysts.

But they could cost autoworkers – and us – much more.

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VW, Victory Gin and the Chestnut Tree Cafe, by Eric Peters

Totalitarian regimes take us backwards, not forwards. From Eric Peters at ericpetersautos.com:

In the final pages of Orwell’s 1984, we find Winston Smith – the novel’s main character – drinking Victory Gin at the Chestnut Tree Cafe. He’s been released by the Party after years of torture for Thought Crime but rather than hate the Party for what it did to him, Winston has come to love Big Brother.

VW, too.

After $30 billion and counting in fines and buybacks for “cheating” on government emissions certification tests, the manufacturer of people’s cars sees that two plus two equals five… and committed to building nothing but high-dollar/short range/long-recharge-time electric cars, commencing with the ID3, a Golf-sized five-door hatchback electric car just unveiled in Germany ahead of the Frankfurt Auto Show.

Next will come the IDCruzz – an electric crossover SUV with a 110 MPH top speed (just slightly faster than a ’74 Super Beetle) and a range of 202 miles (less than the range of a ’74 Super Beetle).

For three or four times what a ’74 Super Beetle cost.

The People’s Car becomes the Politically Correct Car. And the Elitist Car – since most people won’t be able to afford one.

VW is trying to put a Happy Face on it all.

CEO Herbert Diess says the ID3 is “the world’s first carbon neutral car,” meaning it doesn’t generate any carbon dioxide at the tailpipe, because it hasn’t got one. True enough. This is what makes it a politically correct car  – because in the lunatic world of “climate change,” it’s only tailpipe “emissions” of C02 that are cause for “concern.” Those “emitted” at the smokestack are don’t-worry-about-that (well, for now).

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You’re in Good Hands With Elon, by Eric Peters

The point of electric cars and driverless technology isn’t to make cars safer or more environmentally friendly, but to give the government the ability to monitor and ultimately control where you go. From Eric Peters at ericpetersautos.com:

Imagine if your insurance company knew about it immediately every time you drove faster than any speed limit, anywhere. That you failed to come to a complete dead stop at every stop sign before proceeding – regardless of the need to come to a complete dead stop.

Every instance of seatbelt scofflawism.

That you drove eight hours straight to visit friends in another state; that last Thursday, you “accelerated aggressively” while trying to merge with traffic. That you turned off the traction control the other day – and squealed the tires.

And here comes the bill, custom-tailored just for you.

This is what Elon Musk has in mind next. The King of Mandated Business is getting into the insurance business – a logical thing since car insurance is the original mandated business that set the precedent for the rest of them. It’s an even better business than the electric car business because everyone has to buy car insurance, if they own a car – even if it’s not an electric car.

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“Crushed Every Four Years,” by Eric Peters

The car companies want to get rid of cars that last 10 to 15 years and stand idle much of their lives. Here is what they have in mind, from Eric Peters at theburningplatform.com:

If you’ve been wondering what’s behind the electric car/automated car push, Ford’s John Rich just let the cat out of the sack:

“We will exhaust and crush a car every four years in this business.”

That business being the automated/electric car business.

Rich should know, since he’s the head of Ford’s Autonomous Vehicles Operations. He really means automated, of course – since the very last thing the cars he’s talking about are is autonomous.

Look it up for yourself.

Autonomous means independent from external control.

Nothing could be lessautonomous than a car entirely under the control of the governmental-industrial combine which lays downs the operating parameters (via the programming) of the car, over which you have no control whatsoever. How do you control a car without a steering wheel, brake or accelerator pedal?

A car you don’t even own?

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The Offloading, by Eric Peters

Car companies are begging for regulation, why? From Eric Peters at ericpetersautos.com:

When the car industry begs to be regulated, you have to wonder about the regulations. And the motivations.

Is it a case of being crazy . . . or crazy like a fox?

The car industry – well, about a third of it so far (Ford, Honda, BMW, VW and Mercedes) wants to be forced to make cars that average close to 50 miles-per-gallon by 2025, as fatwa’d about four years ago by the federal regulatory apparat.

The current head of the federal government – President Trump – is trying to rescind the fatwa or at least dial it back to something more technically and economically feasible. In a startling turnabout, the car companies have stated that even if Trump dials back the federal fatwa, they will impose it upon themselves by embracing a mirrored fatwaissued by the state of California. Which will then become a de facto national fatwa.

It sounds crazy – self-destructive, at least.

And this self-imposed mania for saving gas? It’s like losing weight. Sounds great – but it’s not as easy as it sounds .

Or inexpensive.

Nor demanded by the market – but that’s another thing.

As Trump pointed out the other day, the cost of the technology – the physical hardware as well as physical changes to the way cars are designed – that will be necessary to get cars to average nearly 50 MPG (as specified by the fatwa) in just five years’ time will cost thousands of dollars per car. Trump says about $3,000 per car – which is very close to the mark because the only current cars that average 50 MPG and so fatwa-compliant are hybrids  – models like the Toyota Prius and Kia Niro.

These hybrids cost about $3k more than an otherwise similar non-hybrid. This is what the government wants you to spend to save gas. Or rather, it’s what Trump doesn’t want you to have to spend. But the car industry – VW, Ford, Honda, BMW and Benz, anyhow – wants you to spend.

Wants you to have to spend.

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The Electric Obamaphone, by Eric Peters

The main problem with Elon Musk’s and soon to be everyone else’s electric cars is there will not be enough people who will buy them at anything close to profitable prices. From Eric Peters at theburningplatform.com:

Elon just admitted something which is getting very little coverage – and no explanation.

He announced that Tesla will no longer be selling the “affordable” $35,000 Model 3 he promised would be Tesla’s first mass-market electric car. Like so many of Elon’s promises, that one’s out the window, too.

The price of the least expensive Tesla just rose to $39,000. Well, technically $38,990 – to make it go down easier.

That’s still a $4k decrease in “affordability” – and a reality check.

Elon is admittingthat electric cars aren’t mass-market cars. That after all the glitzy assurances, after all these years, in the end, they are what they have always been: Specialty cars for people with the disposable income to indulge other-than-economic considerations such as “technology” and – as Elon loves to tout – the driving characteristics of electric cars.

There’s nothing per se objectionable about specialty cars – whether electric or powered by a high-performance boxer six, like a Porsche.

But there is a problem.

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The Future Is Stupid, from the Feral Irishman

Image may contain: car and text

https://www.theburningplatform.com/2019/07/14/the-future-is-stupid/

The Coming Cash For Not-Clunkers, by Eric Peters

There’s one way to enhance demand for electric cars: ban all the alternatives. From Eric Peters at theburningplatform.com:

What do you suppose will happen when they build them – but no one comes?

Within the next couple of years, almost every car company will be building – and trying to sell – electric  cars.

It won’t be just Tesla’s cars – which cars Tesla is alreadyhaving trouble trying to sell. Chiefly, because there is a built-in limit to the number of $35,000 and up cars you can sell – regardless of the number you build.

Imagine a real estate developer who only built $350,000 houses – heedless of the ability of people in the area to buy them. The homes are “nice” – they have triple-paned casement windows and granite countertops and three bathrooms.

But no one comes.

Imagine a quadrupling of EV production – and that’s a lowball figure – for a “market” that constitutes at the present moment about 1 percent of the total and which is driven almost entirely by government mandates and propped up by taxpayer-mulcted subsidies and which no one has yet figured out how to earn an honest dollar from.

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Grokking the Con, by Eric Peters

The con is that electric cars can stand on their own without government support. They can’t. from E

Anyone who hasn’t grokked the con by now is probably a hopeless case. Tesla has been in “business” for going on 15 years and still loses money despite taking billions.

Ask yourself what kind of “business” gets propped up by the government for that long – and what it implies about the reasons for propping it up.

Tesla’s purpose isn’t crony capitalism/rent-seeking, except incidentally.

Its purpose was to habituate the public to the EV as a “normal” car. As the inevitable replacement for our current (IC) cars.

To get the public used to hearing about and seeing electric cars. And most of all, to sex them up.

This was also done in order to nudge the car industry into the Electric Car Era – to nudge it into committing billions to EV development, which has happened. So as to mainstream EVs.

To make them seem The Future – and  IC-powered cars so yesterday.

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