Tag Archives: Fossil fuels

Sky-High Prices Create New Age Of Energy Awareness, by Dan Doyle

“Energy awareness” is code for the economy runs on fossil fuels and Green Energy is nowhere close to being able to replace it. From Dan Doyle at oilprice.com:

  • ollowing years of ‘Green Enlightenment, decision-makers are waking up to the fact that blindly following an ESG agenda has led to sky-high energy prices.
  • Europe must not overlook domestic gas resources in its scramble to find new energy sources.
  • The renewable energy rollout needs much more time than it is being given.

An age of awareness looks to be upon us. Personal pronouns, the green movement, the swamp, ESG, DEI, CRT, LGBTQ, regressive therapy, equity, defund the PoPo, and now, perplexingly, oil and gas.   Let’s call it a New Energy Awareness or just Energy Awareness (“EA” if you go in for initialisms).  Consider it a natural progression, a fallout from the previous Age of Enlightened and Entitled Complaint (“EEC”)—a swinging of the pendulum from the farcical to factual. It’s like the new peak oil. But more cultural, less depletion.

How could this be, that oil and gas should suddenly be gaining favor? It seems so unreal, so unexpected, as much so as an honest review of Jared Kushner’s new book.

But there it is, oil and gas are trending positively in the hearts and minds of German politicians. Natural gas is being met with whispered acceptance by green-minded bureaucrats. These are the same government types who spent the last decade shutting down coal-fired utilities and planting the green flag through the hearts of their nuclear plants.  There has become a reordering of priorities, possibly even an admission that the green energy revolution has gone too far, too fast, and that blind acceptance has outrun capacity.  What should have been a thoughtful rollout instead transcended probity to become religious fervor.

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Our ‘Rhythmically Dancing’ Physical Real Economy, by Alasdair Macleod

No matter how clever you are, all your efforts are grounded in physical reality. From Alasdair Macleod at strategic-culture.org:

Western modernity is contingent on cheap fossil fuel. If that shrinks, our economies will shrink too – to a sub-optimal level.

The poet, WB Yeats, often used in his writings two old Irish folkloric terms: ‘thrall’ and ‘glamour’. Being in thrall to something meant that a person was wholly overpowered by some unaccountable ‘magnetism’ emanating into their world, and into whose grip they had fallen. It was, if you like, being caught up by some irresistible, ‘magical’ spell, exerted by some ‘thing’, some ‘being’, or some ‘image-idea’. The sense was of being rendered helpless, held immobile in a spider’s web; bewitched.

Glamour was something magical that the fairies threw over a ‘thing’ or ‘being’ that gave them the power to put others in their thrall – to pull people into their spider’s web. Glamour was the casting of the spell into which humans fell.

Yeats was relating old stories from Ireland about fairies and their magic, sometimes harmless, but as often as not the fairy ‘spells’ were forces that led unerringly to tragedy. We may not be dealing here with fairy tales per se, as was Yeats. Nonetheless, framed differently, we live bewitched by today’s ‘spell’, although most would deny it vehemently.

Naturally, we do not see ourselves today, as naïf. We have a firm hand on the realness of our solidly material world. We absolutely do not believe in fairy tales or magic. Yet …

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Climate Science Spawns Serfdom, by Donald W. Miller, Jr., MD

Fossils fuels have been a great boon to humanity, creating unprecedented advances in living standards. Now they’re trying to reverse all that, and the effect on living standards will be tragically predictable. From Donald W. Miller, Jr., MD, at lewrockwell.com:

In my writings for LewRockwell.com I first focused on climate change in “Finding Truth in Phoenix,” in 2003 after attending the 21st Annual Meeting of Doctors for Disaster Preparedness held in Phoenix, Arizona that year.

Willie Soon, PhD, an astrophysicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, gave the first talk, on climate change. He refuted claims that the 1990s was the warmest decade of the millennium and that the 20th century was warmer than any other century.

Robert Balling, PhD, Director of the Office of Climatology at Arizona State University showed that the temperature of the earth’s atmosphere, measured by balloon and satellite thermometers had not changed in the previous 25 years, even though CO2 levels were rising. And Sherwood Idso, PhD,

President of the Center for the Study of Carbon Dioxide and Global Change found that a 300 ppm (parts per million) boost in concentration of CO2 increases the productivity of plants by 30 to 50 percent. Orange trees produce twice as many oranges, each with 20 percent greater vitamin C when the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere doubles, from 300 to 600 ppm. (Atmospheric carbon dioxide was 370 ppm in 2003 and is 421 ppm now.)

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Biden’s “Incredible Transition”: High Gas Prices, Supply Shortages Part Of Plan To Unleash Green Economy, by Joshua Phlipp and Frank Fang

The only way you can make renewable energy competitive with fossil fuels is to artificially elevate the price of the latter. From Joshua Phlipp and Frank Fang at The Epoch Times via zerohedge.com:

As Americans bear the brunt of a sagging economy, the Biden administration appears to be  framing this as a good thing, believing that citizens will be better off in the future if current supply shortages and high gas prices spiral out of control.

The United States, according to President Joe Biden, is in the midst of an “incredible transition”—one that will pave the way for a green economy.

While the administration may tout the benefits of a sustainable future, the question remains as to what will happen to average Americans while this “transition” takes place.

More importantly, what’s the endgame of all this that Americans don’t know about?

Biden, during a May 23 joint press conference in Japan with the country’s Prime Minister Kishida Fumio, used the word “transition” to seemingly admit that soaring gasoline prices are just part of his administration’s overall plan for moving from hydrocarbons to renewables.

“When it comes to the gas prices, we’re going through an incredible transition that is taking place that, God willing, when it’s over, we’ll be stronger and the world will be stronger and less reliant on fossil fuels when this is over,” Biden said.

The comment seems to suggest that ensuring the country’s gas supply is not high on Biden’s agenda, though the administration did announce to release of 1 million barrels of crude oil a day for six months between May and August.

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Without Fossil Fuels There Is No Need for Electricity, by Ronald Stein

Life is going to be pretty bleak without fossil fuels. From Ronald Stein at lewrockwell.com:

America is in a fast pursuit toward achieving President Biden’s stated goal that “we are going to get rid of fossil fuels” to achieve the Green New Deal’s (GND) pursuit of wind turbines and solar panels to provide electricity to run the world, but WAIT, everything in our materialistic lives and economies cannot exist without crude oil, coal, and natural gas.

Everything that needs electricity, from lights, vehicles, iPhones, defibrillators, computers, telecommunications, etc., are all made with the oil derivatives manufactured from crude oil.

The need for electricity will decrease over time without crude oil. With no new things to power, and the deterioration of current things made with oil derivatives over the next few decades and centuries, the existing items that need electricity will not have replacement parts and will ultimately become obsolete in the future and the need for electricity will diminish accordingly.

The Green New Deal proposal calls on the federal government to wean the United States from fossil fuels and focus on electricity from wind and solar, but why? What will there be to power in the future without fossil fuels?

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How Many of the World’s 8 Billion Will Survive Without Fossil Fuels? Ronald Stein

If the green energy crowd gets their wish and outlaws fossil fuels, there will be a lot fewer humans on the planet. That, too, is their wish. From Ronald Stein at lewrockwell.com:

The economic and technological advances over the last 200 years have transformed how we produce and consume energy. From the 1800’s, the fossil fuels of coal, oil, and natural gas now support more than 80 percent of the world’s energy supply to meet the world’s population demands for more than 6,000 products in our daily lives, made from the oil derivatives manufactured out of crude oil, that did not exist before the 1900’s, and the fuels to move the heavy-weight and long-range needs of more than 50,000 jets and more than 50,000 merchant ships, and the military and space programs. To the left is a pictorial history of these energy transitions over the years.

Recent outlooks published by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and Energy Information Administration (EIA) paint a clear picture that global energy needs are going to rise significantly in the decades to come, reflecting population growth, more nations progressing out of poverty, and the expansion of transportation and technology systems worldwide. Products derived from crude oil will continue to satisfy a significant share of this growing demand.

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Is Going Green Really Worth It? By Rick Mills

Many things look good until you see how much they cost. From Rick Mills at mishtalk.com:

That’s the question Rick Mills at “Ahead Of The Herd” addresses in his most recent column.

Ahead Of the Herd

Headlong Into Electrification

This is a guest post. Everything that follows is by Rick Mills and does not necessarily reflects my views.

I find the ideas presented by Mills to be well presented and worthy of consideration.

Damn the consequences, Rushing headlong into electrification, the West is replacing one energy master with another, says Rick Mills.

Emphasis in Italics Mine, Bolding His.

The United States and its allies, such as Canada, the UK, the European Union, Australia, Japan and South Korea, face a dilemma when it comes to the global electrification of the transportation system and the switch from fossil fuels to cleaner forms of energy.

On the one hand, we want everything to be clean, green and non-polluting, with COP26-inspired goals of achieving net zero carbon emissions by 2050; and several countries aiming to close the chapter on fossil-fuel-powered vehicles, including the United States which is seeking to make half of the country’s auto fleet electric by 2030.

Yet many of these same countries are continuing to go flat-out in their production of oil and natural gas — considered a bridge fuel between fossil fuels and renewables, wrongly imo, for environmental reasons — a/ because they want to be energy-independent; and b/ because they have to. Germany is a good example of a country that tried to switch too soon to renewable energy, retiring its nuclear and coal power plants, only to find that the wind and sun didn’t produce enough electricity. Germany is now having to rely on Russian natural gas and the burning of lignite coal to keep the lights on and homes/ businesses heated throughout the winter.

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Net Zero by 2050? Here’s What It Takes To Get It, by Chris MacIntosh

Net zero by 2050 isn’t going to happen. From Christ MacIntosh at internationalman.com:

Net Zero by 2050

Here is what a reasonably objective study from the Geological Survey of Finland concludes on just how much more electricity generation will be required to retire natural gas and coal…

The answer: a stink load!

But you need batteries to provide power when the sun isn’t shining and the wind isn’t blowing. Here is an indication of just how much materials would be required to produce all these batteries:

We won’t hold these estimates against the author as there are a number of variables involved. But you get the basic point: there aren’t enough materials on the planet to achieve this dream. It’s a grand absurd delusion!

We wouldn’t worry about natural gas and coal being phased out just yet.

The Net Zero is Just Plain Virtue Signaling.

What is virtue signaling? A form of moral grandstanding in which a viewpoint or answer is calculated to “look good,” thereby making the object or speaker appear virtuous to others, rather than being chosen because it is strictly honest.

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EU Official Warns Of ‘Rolling Blackouts’ As Energy Crisis Worsens, by Tyler Durden

It could be a disastrously cold winter in Europe. Too bad they’re substituting unreliable renewables for reliable fossil fuels and nuclear power. From Tyler Durden at zerohedge.com:

Europe’s energy crisis is about to get a whole lot worse as the Northern Hemisphere winter is just weeks away. New risks are emerging across the continent that households and companies might have to scale back on power use or even plan for rolling blackouts.

There is no immediate fix to the energy crisis that comes from the supply side, with Russia’s Gazprom, the largest supplier of natural gas to Europe, only pumping what it has. At the same time, EU stockpiles remain well below trend.

On Tuesday, Prime Minister Mario Draghi said Italy’s government is ready to combat soaring energy prices for households, according to Bloomberg.

“We set aside 1.2 billion euros ($1.4 billion) in June and over 3 billion euros in September,” Draghi said. “We are now taking steps in the budget and are prepared to continue doing so, with particular attention to the most vulnerable.”

“Given the current energy supply system, a blackout cannot be ruled out” across Europe, Minister Giancarlo Giorgetti said, adding that “it’s important to neutralize the impact of increased energy bills on households and companies in the fairest way possible.”

Even before the winter season arrives, cold weather is driving energy prices across Europe to record highs. The massive rally in European gas prices is not diminishing anytime soon. Gas prices at the Dutch TTF hub, the benchmark gas price for Europe, jumped to €100 per MWh, adding more pressure on households who are already dealing with rapid food and shelter inflation.

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Biden’s Baffling Oil Policy Faces Backlash From All Sides, by Irina Slav

Why should Biden’s energy policies be any less baffling than any of his other policies? From Irina Slave at oilprice.com:

  • President Biden is in a tight spot when it comes to energy
  • The White House continues to face critique from both environmentalists and the oil and gas industry
  • If energy demand continues to grow at the current pace, switching from pragmatism to an all-out renewables agenda will be a huge challenge

President Joe Biden and his administration hardly planned for everything that happened this year. In fairness, no administration could have planned for it: soaring oil and gas demand, tight supply, rising prices fueling inflation that has quickly gone from nothing to worry about to the biggest worry for many.

Yet that’s not the worst of it for the Biden administration. The president came into office with the pledge to set the United States on a course towards a lower-carbon energy future. This would have been a challenging task even under the best of circumstances, the U.S. being one of the biggest polluters in the world. With the energy crunch, the task becomes almost impossible.

It is no wonder, then, that when Biden started calling on OPEC to boost crude oil production, nervous about rising gas prices at American filling stations, he instantly attracted accusations of hypocrisy. After all, he was pushing an energy transition agenda, he was clearly not in favor of boosting domestic oil production, and one of the first executive orders he signed was the one that killed the Keystone XL pipeline.

The White House’s climate envoy, John Kerry, got asked about Biden’s energy policy at the COP26 summit in Glasgow last week. How could the president urge OPEC to pump more oil while campaigning for the phase-out of fossil fuels, the media asked Kerry.

“He’s asking them to boost production in the immediate moment,” Kerry said in response, as quoted by the Wall Street Journal. “And as the transition cuts in, there won’t be that need as you deploy the solar panels, as you deploy the transmission lines, as you build out the grid.”

Kerry’s statement is in line with Biden’s own defense of his latest moves in the energy area.

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