Tag Archives: Electricity

What’s Next, Inevitably . . . by Eric Peters

Houses use a lot of power, which could mean that a compulsory downsizing for many Americans is on the green agenda. From Eric Peters at ericpetersautos.com:

 
 

Electric cars are, of course, merely for starters.

Because it follows, inevitably, that if Americans must give up fossil-fueled cars in order to “reduce their carbon footprint,” no matter the cost to Americans – they will be told they may no longer use fossil fuels to power their homes. 

To keep them warm. To heat water. To cook food.

No need to wait, either.

People in California have already been told. Decrees have been issued by the same people decreeing the wearing of the Holy Facial Burqa – and the closing of businesses – that in future (by 2023, the not-far future) building codes will require new construction homes to not use fossil fuels such as natural gas for heat, including hot water.

It is very probable that existing homes that have gas heat – or fireplaces, even – will be the object of “break their will” policies such as punishing taxes on natural gas, propane and bans on the use of wood-burning stoves to heat these homes – the latter already also a decree in parts of California.

And since California now determines national policy, attempts will be made to impose similar measures nationally as the same kinds of people who have their hands on the levers of power in California also have their hands on the levers of power practically everywhere.

Including Texas.

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“Power Bills To The Moon”: Chaos, Shock As Electricity Prices Across US Explode, by Tyler Durden

A lot of people may have trouble getting head during a mammoth Arctic cold spell across the Midwest and South. This could get quite serious and potentially deadly. From Tyler Durden at zerohedge.com:

Updated (1726 ET): Weather forecast models suggest the polar vortex will continue pouring Arctic air into much of the central US through Feb. 20. This means nat gas prices could rise even higher early next week as electricity demand continues to soar over the weekend as Americans crank up their thermostats and watch Netflix shows or mine Bitcoin.

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On Thursday, when we reported that nat gas prices across the plains states had soared to never before seen levels as a result of a brutal polar vortex blast…

… which literally froze off nattie supply as wellheads freeze-offs, cutting production receipts just when they’re most needed by customers’ demand for heating, we said that since the winter blast is expected to last for the duration of the week, it is likely that nattie prices across the plains states could hit GME batshit levels.

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California’s Looming ‘Green New Car Wreck’, by Anthony Watts

The state that doesn’t have enough electricity is mandating electric cars. From Anthony Watts at wattsupwiththat.com:

The numbers don’t pencil out for the future where just 25% of cars in California would be electric.

Governor Newsom announces major climate initiative, September 23, 2020. (Screenshot via California Gavin Newsom)

On September 23, California Gov. Gavin Newsom issued an executive order that will ban the sale of gasoline-powered cars in the Golden State by 2035. Ignoring the hard lessons of this past summer, when California’s solar- and wind-reliant electric grid underwent rolling blackouts, Newsom now adds a huge new burden to the grid in the form electric vehicle charging. If California officials follow through and enforce Newsom’s order, the result will be a green new car version of a train wreck.

Let’s run some numbers. According to Statista, there are more than 15 million vehicles registered in California. Per the U.S. Department of Energy, there are only 256,000 electric vehicles registered in the state—just 1.7 percent of all vehicles.

Using the Tesla Model3 mid-range model as a baseline for an electric car, you’ll need to use about 62 kilowatt-hours (KWh) of power to charge a standard range Model 3 battery to full capacity. It will take about eight hours to fully charge it at home using the standard Tesla NEMA 14-50 charger.

Now, let’s assume that by 2040, five years after the mandate takes effect, also assuming no major increase in the number of total vehicles, California manages to increase the number of electric vehicles to 25 percent of the total vehicles in the state. If each vehicle needs an average of 62 kilowatt-hours for a full charge, then the total charging power required daily would be 3,750,000 x 62 KWh, which equals 232,500,000 KWh, or 232.5 gigawatt-hours (GWh) daily.

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Progressive Utopia Of California Becomes First State To Eliminate Electricity Entirely, from The Babylon Bee

SACRAMENTO, CA—California is being heralded as a progressive utopia after eliminating electricity entirely.

Working by candelight at his desk, Governor Gavin Newsom signed a new law that bans electricity, propelling the state into a progressive futuristic paradise. Newsom said he got the idea while experiencing the latest round of rolling blackouts in the state. He decided to make the blackouts the law of the land.

“Other, backward states still use carbon-heavy electricity, gas for heating and cooking, and wasteful air conditioning,” he said proudly as people applauded around him. “But not on my watch. California has progressed beyond these archaic concepts.”

The law also bans vehicles, forcing pedestrians to use innovative new horse-driven carriages.

Next on the legislative docket? The elimination of water-wasting toilets, to be replaced by just going on the sidewalk. A pilot program in San Francisco has been very successful, according to the homeless population there.

A Perspective on Electric Vehicles, by Gary Novak

It is more inefficient to power a car with electricity than it is with gasoline. From Gary Novak at Science Errors on nov79.com:

An electric auto will convert 5-10% of the energy in natural gas into motion. A normal vehicle will convert 20-30% of the energy in gasoline into motion. That’s 3 or 4 times more energy recovered with an internal combustion vehicle than an electric vehicle.

Electricity is a specialty product. It’s not appropriate for transportation. It looks cheap at this time, but that’s because it was designed for toasters, not transportation. Increase the amount of wiring and infrastructure by a factor of a thousand, and it’s not cheap.

Electricity does not scale up properly to the transportation level due to its miniscule nature. Sure, a whole lot can be used for something, but at extraordinary expense and materials.

Using electricity as an energy source requires two energy transformation steps, while using petroleum requires only one. With electricity, the original energy, usually chemical energy, must be transformed into electrical energy; and then the electrical energy is transformed into the kinetic energy of motion. With an internal combustion engine, the only transformation step is the conversion of chemical energy to kinetic energy in the combustion chamber.

The difference matters, because there is a lot of energy lost every time it is transformed or used. Electrical energy is harder to handle and loses more in handling.

The use of electrical energy requires it to move into and out of the space medium (aether) through induction. Induction through the aether medium should be referred to as another form of energy, but physicists sandwich it into the category of electrical energy. Going into and out of the aether through induction loses a lot of energy.

Another problem with electricity is that it loses energy to heat production due to resistance in the wires. A short transmission line will have 20% loss built in, and a long line will have 50% loss built in. These losses are designed in, because reducing the loss by half would require twice as much metal in the wires. Wires have to be optimized for diameter and strength, which means doubling the metal would be doubling the number of transmission lines.

To continue reading: A Perspective on Electric Vehicles