Tag Archives: Mohammad bin Salman

Murder of Saudi Journalist Builds Opposition to Yemen War, by Reese Erlich

If the backlash from Jamal Khashoggi’s murder leads to the end of Saudi Arabia’s war in Yemen, then some good will have come from the murder. From Reese Erlich at antiwar.com:

The murder of dissident Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi has backfired on the Saudi royal family by focusing new attention on its vicious war on Yemen.

The last few weeks have seen startling new reports on civilian atrocities and growing support for a House of Representative resolution invoking the War Powers Act to stop the war. Rep. Ro Khanna (D-San Jose) now has 73 cosponsors for a resolution that would stop US participation in the Yemen slaughter.

The Arab Spring spread through Saudi Arabia and continued for years in the mostly Shia Muslim, eastern part of the country. When the current Crown Prince Muhammed bin Salman came to power, he escalated the war in Yemen and cracked down on dissent at home. Photo by Reese Erlich.

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The Man For Our Age, by Robert Gore

Mohammad bin Salman has a bright future.

Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman, known by his initials, MbS, stands as the quintessential figure of our age. He represents the ultimate, larger-than-life fulfillment of the stated aspirations of the world’s many power grabs disguised as political philosophies. That “respectable” potentates and media worthies are denouncing him now is not because he allegedly had Jamal Khashoggi murdered, but in allegedly doing so, had the bad taste to reveal the blood-soaked tactics of their power grabs.

MbS is a beacon for Democratic Socialists, Regular Socialists, and Marxists. The differences between these sects are mere labeling. At root, they all believe that reward should be separated from production, which entails forcibly separating production from those who produced it. MbS has produced nothing, yet the thirty-three-year-old has rewarded himself with a $500 million yacht, a $450 million Leonardo da Vinci painting, and a château near Versailles for which he paid over $300 million.

Most socialists claim they’d be happy with state-provided jobs, housing, medical care, and incomes (they wouldn’t, they’re a permanently unhappy lot), so they might be a bit envious of MbS’s rewards. However, not one riyal has come from capitalist exploitation, it has all came from the munificence of the Saudi government he in effect heads. From each according to his ability to each according to his need—the government has decided he’s the country’s neediest person. He’s living the something-for-nothing dream.

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US Pressuring Saudis To Heal Qatar Rift, Ease Sanctions, As Riyadh’s Isolation Grows, by Tyler Durden

The US will probably exact some concessions from Saudi Arabia as its price for looking the other way concerning Jamal Khashoggi’s murder and Mohammad bin Salman’s part in it. From Tyler Durden at zerohedge.com:

In the latest fallout over the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, the United States is demanding that Saudi Arabia make nice with Qatar, according to sources quoted in Bloomberg.

Three officials with knowledge of the issue have described to Bloomberg that the US is “raising pressure” on the kingdom to “wind down” its ongoing “political and economic isolation of Qatar” at a moment that Riyadh is potentially facing its own such isolation as international outrage has grown since the October 2nd slaying of Khashoggi inside the Istanbul consulate.

One U.S. official further says the Saudis are being asked to “take steps” to wind down its over three-year long bombing campaign in Yemen, or at least to greatly mitigate the factors causing a massive humanitarian crisis in famine — an ironic and contradictory request given the Pentagon’s own lead role as part of the Saudi coalition.

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10 Embarrassing Questions for Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad Bin Salman, by Middle East Monitor

These questions would certainly put good old MbS on the spot. From Middle East Monitor at theantimedia.org:

Human Rights Watch (HRW) has asked ten questions to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad Bin Salman, all of them related to the human rights situation in the Kingdom and Riyadh’s violations against neighbouring countries.

This came in a statement issued by the organisation demanding Bin Salman provide answers to questions related to the war in Yemen, the detention of activists and academics, the arrest of princes and businessmen, forced disappearances, the oppression of women and non-Muslims in the Kingdom. It also demanded Riyadh explain its campaign against oppositionists abroad, the most recent victim of which was journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

HRW’s statement pointed out that the Kingdom’s admission that government representatives killed Khashoggi in its consulate in Istanbul has provoked an extensive, albeit belated, review of the country’s record of human rights violations. Human Rights Watch also called on foreign government officials to hold Saudi Arabia accountable for this record.

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‘Mohammad bin Salman Must Go’, but US-Saudi Ties Are Here to Stay, by Federico Pieraccini

Regime change in Saudi Arabia? It might well serve Deep State interests. From Federico Pieraccini at strategic-culture.org:

'Mohammad bin Salman Must Go’, but US-Saudi Ties Are Here to Stay

Mohammad bin Salman is fully aware of the Western elite’s understanding of its own values. While he may be given a pass to bomb Yemen and kill thousands of innocent civilians, he should know better than to dare touch a Washington Post columnist – “one of ours”, as one MSNBC host said. Did he not realize there would be consequences?

As more information came out, many analysts began to confront the most obvious question. Was it possible that Mohammed bin Salman (MBS) was so arrogant that he could not imagine the consequences of such a heinous crime? How could MBS betray Trump this way, not anticipating that the Democrats and the mainstream media would jump all over Trump’s friendship with him? Could he be so foolish as to place in jeopardy foreign investments planned at the Davos in the Desert conference on October 23? The answer to that question is apparently: yes, he could.

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Should US-Saudi Alliance Be Saved? by Patrick J. Buchanan

If you climb into bed with the morally reprehensible, sooner or later the moral reprehensibility rubs off. From Patrick J. Buchanan at buchanan.org:

Over the weekend Donald Trump warned of “severe punishment” if an investigation concludes that a Saudi hit team murdered Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi in the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

Riyadh then counter-threatened, reminding us that, as the world’s largest oil exporter, Saudi Arabia “plays an impactful and active role in the global economy.”

Message: Sanction us, and we may just sanction you.

Some of us yet recall how President Nixon’s rescue of Israel in the 1973 Yom Kippur War triggered a Saudi oil embargo that led to months of long gas lines in the United States, and contributed to Nixon’s fall.

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Skripal and Khashoggi: A Tale of Two Disappearances, by Finian Cunningham

The presumption of innocence, as applied by the US government, is far stronger for Mohammad bin Salman than it is for Vladimir Putin. From Finian Cunningham at strategic-culture.org:

Two disappearances, and two very different responses from Western governments, which illustrates their rank hypocrisy.

When former Russian spy Sergei Skripal went missing in England earlier this year, there was almost immediate punitive action by the British government and its NATO allies against Moscow. By contrast, Western governments are straining with restraint towards Saudi Arabia over the more shocking and provable case of murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

The outcry by Western governments and media over the Skripal affair was deafening and resulted in Britain, the US and some 28 other countries expelling dozens of Russian diplomats on the back of unsubstantiated British allegations that the Kremlin tried to assassinate an exiled spy with a deadly nerve agent. The Trump administration has further tightened sanctions citing the Skripal incident.

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