Category Archives: Religion

A Global Fiat Currency: “One Ring to Rule Them All”, by Thorsten Polleit

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One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne

In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.

One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,

One Ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them.

In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.

J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings

We’re fighting Sauron. From Thorsten Polleit at mises.org:

1.

Human history can be viewed from many angles. One of them is to see it as a struggle for power and domination, as a struggle for freedom and against oppression, as a struggle of good against evil.

That is how Karl Marx (1818–83) saw it, and Ludwig von Mises (1881–1973) judged similarly. Mises wrote:

The history of the West, from the age of the Greek Polis down to the present-day resistance to socialism, is essentially the history of the fight for liberty against the encroachments of the officeholders.1

But unlike Marx, Mises recognized that human history does not follow predetermined laws of societal development but ultimately depends on ideas that drive human action.

From Mises’s point of view, human history can be understood as a battle of good ideas against bad ideas.

Ideas are good if the actions they recommend bring results that are beneficial for everyone and lead the actors to their desired goals;

At the same time, good ideas are ethically justifiable, they apply to everyone, anytime and anywhere, and ensure that people who act upon them can survive.

On the other hand, bad ideas lead to actions that do not benefit everyone, that do not cause all actors to achieve their goals and/or are unethical.

Good ideas are, for example, people accepting “mine and yours”; or entering into exchange relationships with one another voluntarily. Bad ideas are coercion, deception, embezzlement, theft.

Evil ideas are very bad ideas, ideas through which whoever puts them into practice is consciously harming others. Evil ideas are, for example, physical attacks, murder, tyranny.

2.

With Lord of the Rings, J. J. R. Tolkien (1892–1973) wrote a literary monument about the epic battle between good and evil. His fantasy novel, published in 1954, was a worldwide success, not least because of the movie trilogy, released from 2001 to 2003.

What is Lord of the Rings about? In the First Age, the deeply evil Sauron—the demon, the hideous horror, the necromancer—had rings of power made by the elven forges.

Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky,

Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone,

Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die,

One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne

In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.

One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,

One Ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them.

In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.

But Sauron secretly forges an additional ring into which he pours all his darkness and cruelty, and this one ring, the master ring, rules all the other rings.

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Will They Ever Undiaper? by Eric Peters

It’s very difficult to separate adherents from their cult. From Eric Peters at ericpetersautos.com:

Do you remember when you saw your first Effaced Face?

For me, it was around January of 2020 – at the Sweet Donkey Coffee shop, where I used to spend a few hours almost every day with my laptop, working in what was then the pleasant company of other people, coming and going. The background sounds – and sights – of normal life, as it will never be again.

I can pinpoint the moment when that pleasant normalcy ended, probably forever. I glanced up from what I was working on and saw my first weaponized hypochondriac. This woman, wearing a device over her face that I had never seen on anyone’s face – other than Michael Jackson’s – outside of a surgical suite. I saw the fear in her eyes as she scuttled away from the counter, clutching her coffee – quickly exiting the shop. It amused and saddened me at first. On the one hand, this woman was clearly out of her mind with fear, such that she would walk around with a dust mask over her face. On the other, her fear wasn’t strong enough to prevent her from risking death – in her mind – by entering a plague den, to get a cup of coffee.

Textbook DSM hypochondria.

There went a mentally ill person, I though to myself. I never could have imagined, at the time, how quickly this illness would spread. Nor how intractable it would prove.

Today, almost two years later, there are tens of millions of such mentally ill people walking around – and driving around, alone in their cars except for their faithful companion, the comforting rag they wear, everywhere. Over and over, again. The effusions of their noses and mouths collecting in the nasty fabric. People don’t wear the same pair of underwear as long – and wash them more often.

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Biden Administration Blocks rescue of Persecuted Christians from Afghanistan, by Raymond Ibrahim

Christians are often persecuted in Muslim majority countries and Afghanistan is no exception. Are government has done almost nothing to help persecuted Christians in that country, where they are often seen as symbols of the West. From Raymond Ibrahim at gatestoneinstitute.org:

  • “The State Department has blocked us every step of the way. The State Department and the White House have been the biggest problem.  Everyone else, everyone else, has been working together, putting aside differences and trying to get these people to safety. The State Department and the White House have blocked us every single step of the way. In fact, an ambassador was called in Macedonia last night and told not to accept any of these people… We have to send people into even greater danger to try to smuggle these Christians out, who are marked not just for death, but to be set on fire alive because they’re converted Christians.”   — Glenn Beck, Tucker Carlson Tonight, August 26, 2021.
  • Although nearly 80 percent of all persecution Christians experience around the globe is committed in the Islamic world, Afghanistan is actually the worst of all Muslim nations.
  • According to the World Watch List, which ranks the 50 nations in which Christians are most persecuted for their faith, Afghanistan is the second-worst nation in the world, followed on the heels of the worst nation, North Korea…. That report was published nine months ago — when a U.S.-supported government ran Afghanistan. Since then, matters have only significantly worsened for Christians….
  • Even worse, because U.S. and Western leadership are careful not to show any interest in Christian minorities — a sentiment that goes hand in hand with Western acquiescence to “Islamic sensibilities” — they are more prone to turn a blind eye to the persecution of Christians than even some Muslim governments.
While preventing Christian victims of Islamic terror from escape or entry into the US, the Biden administration is possibly granting refugee status to countless, inadequately vetted male Muslims from Afghanistan — not a few of whom may share in the same worldview as ISIS and the Taliban. Pictured: Afghans, hoping to leave Afghanistan, line up at the main entrance gate of Kabul airport on August 28, 2021. (Photo by Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images)

The Biden administration is preventing the rescue of persecuted Christian minorities from the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan, where they face certain and likely gruesome death.

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LIBERA NOS A MALO: Considerations on the Great Reset and the New World Order, by Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò

Heretical thoughts from a Catholic archbishop whose views contradict the church’s institutional embrace of the New World Order. From Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò at insidethe vatican.com:

    Letter #100, 2021, Tuesday, August 31: Viganò issues a new letter entitled “Deliver us from evil” (in Latin, “Libera nos a malo,” the last words of the Lord’s prayer)

    I received today a new text from Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò and send it out here below.

    There is a video of the archbishop delivering this text in Italian at this Lifesitenews link. By reading the English text below while clicking on the link, you can hear the text in Italian, and follow along in English.

    P.S. The archbishop has also granted a long, wide-ranging videotaped interview, in English, to be released later this week.

LIBERA NOS A MALO
Considerations on the Great Reset
and the New World Order
by Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò
August 28, 2021
Feast of St. Augustine

No one will be part of the New World Order
unless he carries out an act of worship to Lucifer.
No one will enter the New Age unless he receives Luciferian initiation.
                 David Spangler, Director of the United Nations Planetary Initiative Project (Reflections on The Christ, Findhorn, 1978) 

    For more than a year and a half we have been helplessly witnessing the succession of incongruent events to which most of us are unable to give a plausible justification.

    The pandemic emergency has made particularly evident the contradictions and illogicalities of measures nominally intended to limit contagion – lockdowns, curfews, closures of commercial activities, limitations of public services and classes, suspension of citizens’ rights – but which are disavowed daily by conflicting voices, by clear evidence of ineffectiveness, by contradictions on the part of the same health authorities.

    There is no need to list the measures that almost all the governments of the world have taken without achieving the promised results.

    If we limit ourselves to the presumed advantages that the experimental gene serum should have brought to the community — above all immunity to the virus and renewed freedom of movement — we discover that an Oxford University study published in The Lancet (here) stated that the viral load of those vaccinated with a double dose is 251 times greater than the first strains of the virus (here), despite the proclamations of world leaders, starting with the Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi, according to whom “whoever gets vaccinated lives, whoever does not get the vaccine dies.”

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Do You Live in a Social Capital Desert? by Charles Hugh Smith

What can you draw on from the people around you, the people you know? What can they draw on from you? From Charles Hugh Smith at oftwominds.com:

Necessity is a magnet, and perhaps as what’s essential in our lives changes, social capital will start sprouting, even in the most unlikely places.

“Desert” has become a favored metaphor: food deserts describe neighborhoods with few places to buy fresh fruits and vegetables, democracy deserts describe political regions rigged by gerrymandering, and so on.

Many of us working our way forward to a more resilient, sustainable and healthier future talk about social capital–the intangible but very real network of connections and relationships that characterize social mammals such as humans.

We call this network of ties and trust “capital” because it takes time and effort to build and maintain, and it generates value.

The value generated by social capital has many forms, but the one most commonly cited is favors with an economic value. We say we’re “calling in favors” when we seek help in locating clients, contractors, mechanics, employees, etc., or ask for help in childcare, yardwork, picking someone up at the airport, etc.

The foundations of this form of social capital are 1) longstanding ties to families, schools, home towns or neighborhoods, etc., and 2) reciprocity, being generous with one’s connections, time, experience and expertise to one’s network.

This “investment” isn’t made with calculated returns in mind (though some people do offer help in the hopes of gaining something of far more value than they offered); the eventual value generated is unknown, but everything that’s given–especially the trust that you do what you say you’ll do– is like a savings account that adds value to your place in the network.

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What Would Temüjin Do? by Articles of Confederation

The US government could learn something about fighting in Asia from an historical figure who was pretty darn good at fighting in Asia. From Articles of Confederation at theburningplatform.com:

Over the past few days, I – like most of the rest of the world, I would imagine – have been riveted to news of the most epic boondoggle in American history. I couldn’t help but obsess over how a real leader would have handled not just Afghanistan, but the entire passive-aggressive, effeminate state of affairs in these “United” States since the end of World War 2. As usual, I always circle back to the most maligned (in the West) and misunderstood (in both the East and the West) leader over the last couple of millennia – Temüjin, known to most folks as Genghis Khan.

If the reader is so inclined, pick up a copy of Weatherford’s Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World. It reads more like a fascinating biography than a classical history text, and I’ve made sure my elementary and middle school children have read it along with The Art of War. I wanted them to consume real history and Eastern philosophy before they get into high school and are forced to write essays on such illustrious American topics as The 1619 Project or I Have Two Daddies.

This whole train of thought started not only over Uncle Depends’ dereliction of duty in Bactria, but also the idiotic, talking head hacks in The Exceptional Nation that believe “nobody has won in Afghanistan since, like, the Dawn of Man”. Wrong, you bumbling Western maroons. I’m tired of listening to that garbage rhetoric. Here’s my take on how the Great Genghis Khan (GGK) would have handled Afghanistan.

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Escobar: The Taliban Go To Tianjin

Will Russia, China, and their Eurasian consortium be able to sort out the mess that is Afghanistan? From Pepe Escobar at The Asia Times via zerohedge.com:

China and Russia will be key to solving an ancient geopolitical riddle: how to pacify the ‘graveyard of empires’…

So this is the way the Forever War in Afghanistan ends – if one could call it an ending. Rather, it’s an American repositioning.

Regardless, after two decades of death and destruction and untold trillions of dollars, we’re faced not with a bang – and not with a whimper, either – but rather with a pic of the Taliban in Tianjin, a nine-man delegation led by top political commissioner Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, solemnly posing side by side with Foreign Minister Wang Yi.

Lateral echoes of another Forever War – in Iraq – apply. First, there was the bang: the US not as “the new OPEC,” as per how the neo-con mantra had visualized it, but with the Americans not even getting the oil. Then came the whimper: “No more troops” after December 31, 2021 – except for the proverbial “contractor” army.

The Chinese received the Taliban on an official visit in order once again to propose a very straightforward quid pro quo: We recognize and support your political role in the process of Afghan reconstruction and in return you cut off any possible links with the East Turkestan Islamic Movement, regarded by the UN as a terrorist organization and responsible for a slew of attacks in Xinjiang.

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang explicitly said, “The Taliban in Afghanistan is a pivotal military and political force in the country, and will play an important role in the process of peace, reconciliation, and reconstruction there.”

This follows Wang’s remarks back in June, after a meeting with the foreign ministers of Afghanistan and Pakistan, when he promised not only to “bring the Taliban back into the political mainstream” but also to host a serious intra-Afghan peace negotiation.

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TGIF: How Science Becomes Religion, by Sheldon Richman

Real science is as about as far as you can get from unyielding religious domatism. From Sheldon Richman at libertarianinstitute.org:

The popular slogan today is “Believe in science.” It’s often used as a weapon against people who reject not science in principle but rather one or another prominent scientific proposition, whether it be about the COVID-19 vaccine, climate change, nutrition (low-fat versus low-carb eating), to mention a few. My purpose here is not to defend or deny any particular scientific position but to question the model of science that the loudest self-declared believers in science seem to work from. Their model makes science seem almost identical to what they mean by, and attack as, religion. If that’s the case, we ought not to listen to them when they lecture the rest of us about heeding science.

The clearest problem with the admonition to “believe in science” is that it is of no help whatsoever when well-credentialed scientists–that is, bona fide experts–are found on both (or all) sides of a given empirical question. Dominant parts of the intelligentsia may prefer we not know this, but dissenting experts exist on many scientific questions that some blithely pronounce as “settled” by a “consensus,” that is, beyond debate. This is true regarding the precise nature and likely consequences of climate change and aspects of the coronavirus and its vaccine. Without real evidence, credentialed mavericks are often maligned as having been corrupted by industry, with the tacit faith that scientists who voice the established position are pure and incorruptible. It’s as though the quest for government money could not in itself bias scientific research. Moreover, no one, not even scientists, are immune from group-think and confirmation bias.

So the “believe the science” chorus gives the credentialed mavericks no notice unless it’s to defame them. Apparently, under the believers’ model of science, truth comes down from a secular Mount Sinai (Mount Science?) thanks to a set of anointed scientists, and those declarations are not to be questioned. The dissenters can be ignored because they are outside the elect. How did the elect achieve its exalted station? Often, but not always, it was through the political process: for example, appointment to a government agency or the awarding of prestigious grants. It may be that a scientist simply has won the adoration of the progressive intelligentsia because his or her views align easily with a particular policy agenda.

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We’re Ben and Jerry. Men of Ice Cream, Men of Principle. by Bennet Cohen and Jerry Greenfield

The Ben and Jerry of Ben and Jerry’s explain their stance on ending the company’s business in the occupied territories. From Cohen and Greenfield at archive.vn:

We are the founders of Ben & Jerry’s. We are also proud Jews. It’s part of who we are and how we’ve identified ourselves for our whole lives. As our company began to expand internationally, Israel was one of our first overseas markets. We were then, and remain today, supporters of the State of Israel.
But it’s possible to support Israel and oppose some of its policies, just as we’ve opposed policies of the U.S. government. As such, we unequivocally support the decision of the company to end business in the occupied territories, which a majority of the international community, including the United Nations, has deemed an illegal occupation.
While we no longer have any operational control of the company we founded in 1978, we’re proud of its action and believe it is on the right side of history. In our view, ending the sales of ice cream in the occupied territories is one of the most important decisions the company has made in its 43-year history. It was especially brave of the company. Even though it undoubtedly knew that the response would be swift and powerful, Ben & Jerry’s took the step to align its business and operations with its progressive values.

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Wait, Slavery Is OUR “Original Sin”? by Jared Taylor

American settlers certainly didn’t invent slavery. From Jared Taylor at unz.com:

How many times have you heard that slavery was “America’s original sin”? I’m not quite sure what that means, but I think the idea is that slavery was a uniquely horrible thing that defines the United States and will stain whites forever. It’s one of the few things Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and Barack Obama agree on. There are books about it. Here’s a college course at UC Davis called “Slavery: America’s Original Sin: Part 1.”

The fact is, there has been slavery in every period of history, and just about everywhere. The Greeks and Romans had it, the ancient Egyptians had it, it’s all over the Bible, the Chinese and the pre-Columbian Indians had it, the Maoris in New Zealand had it, and the Muslims had it in spades. But I have never, ever heard of slavery being anyone else’s “original sin.”

About the only societies that never had slaves were primitive hunter-gatherers. As soon as people have some kind of formal social organization, they start taking slaves.

You’ve heard about slavery and mass human sacrifices of Central and South American Indians, but North American Indians were enslaving each other long before the white man showed up.

Tlingit and Haida Indians, who lived in the Pacific Northwest, went raiding for slaves as far South as California. About one quarter of the population were slaves, and the children of slaves were slaves. During potlatches, or huge ceremonial feasts, the Tlingit would sometimes burn property and kill slaves, just to show how rich they were. What’s a couple of slaves to a guy who lives in a house like this?

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