Tag Archives: Resistance

Resistance is Setting the Right Example, by Eric Peters

It’s heartening, some people are standing on principle at great cost amidst the coronavirus hoax. From Eric Peters at ericpetersautos.com:

A teacher recently lost his job for refusing to Face Diaper as ordered by the Sickness Psychotics who run the school where he works. And for refusing to abide the Face Diapering of the kids in his school. As he put it in a letter, his job was to “teach, not terrorize” the kids in his care.

Which is precisely what it is to force kids to walk around with a Face Diaper on. Unlike adults, who can understand the sickness of this “pandemic” of manufactured hysteria, kids – the elementary school-age kids this man taught – are especially vulnerable to psychological damage caused by making them believe everyone’s going to die by making everyone wear a Face Diaper and thus live in terror of everyone.

This teacher refused to go along with it.

After his dismissal, this man was contacted by several parents disgusted by the treatment he received but who admired his taking a stand for himself, on principle – and for the sake of their kids. They pulled their kids out of school and will now homeschool – to be taught by this same teacher, Undiapered and unafraid. Their kids will not be Diapered or made afraid, either.

This is the example to follow if you oppose acceptance of Sickness Psychosis as the “new normal.” Playing along with the deranged isn’t going to cure them. It will enable them. It will empower them. Each giving in to them is just another step toward a very dark place.

Which is why taking not one more step in that direction is so essential.

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Welcome to the Epic the Other Generations Could Only Have Dreamt of, by Allan Stevo

In the great stories, individuals overcome daunting odds to defeat evil. What we’re living through now could end up being a great story. From Allan Stevo at lewrockwell.com:

“From my youngest days I always had the feeling that we were all involved in some great crusade, that the world was a battleground for good and evil, and that our lives would be consumed in that conflict.”

  • Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.

With those lines, Kennedy begins his book “American Values.” In them, he cites a fundamental conflict. This conflict is at the heart of the greatest stories of literature going back to Gilgamesh: a battle between good and evil.

Welcome to 2020.

In Gilgamesh: The tyrant king, Gilgamesh, does harm to the people of Uruk. The gods make a mighty counterweight to him, Enkidu. At first coming into conflict with one another, the two go on a journey together in search of everlasting life, Enkidu dies along the way, Gilgamesh returns a changed man.

In The Odyssey: With Odysseus still not home from the Trojan War, a group of young men have moved into his home where they are eating his food, drinking his wine, and courting his wife. He must go through a series of ordeals on his journey to make his way home, where he finally accomplishes a great feat, kills the freeloaders, and is accepted back home by his wife.

In Beowulf: The title hero, a great warrior, gathers a few people together to save another man’s land from a terrible monster, Grendel. He must repeat that task with the monster’s mother who wants revenge for the death of her son. Years later, Beowulf, repeats this feat against an evil dragon bringing terror.

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The Fear Mask and the “I Surrender” Pose, by Allan Stevo

Governments traffic in fear because fear leads to power. From Allan Stevo at lewrockwell.com:

“For if you put me to death, you will not easily find another, who, to use a rather absurd figure, attaches himself to the city as a gadfly to a horse, which, though large and well bred, is sluggish on account of his size and needs to be aroused by stinging. I think the god fastened me upon the city in some such capacity, and I go about arousing…”

-Socrates, as reported by Plato in The Apology

A gadfly friend of mine has never done the pose of submission to the great state, the “I surrender” pose.

You know, the one where you stick your hands up in the air when someone points a gun at you, exposing your vulnerable torso and midsection.

You know, that “I surrender” pose – the pose that is drilled into you every time you pass through airport security. You must enter the naked body scanner and do the pose of submission. If you don’t you will be barked at, eye-rolled at, and huffed at until you do.

Notably, this “I surrender” pose is mere security theater. It looks like it works. It doesn’t actually work. That, alongside the dehumanizing: take off your shoes, get groped, and throw away whatever items you recently bought that happen to be more than 3.3 ounces.

3.4 ounces will take down a plane, we are assured. 3.3 ounces can’t.

Oh really?

Yes, that’s why it must be confiscated. Otherwise, we would never do such an awful thing like confiscate your private property. A half-full 3.4 ounce container can take down a plane too.

Oh really?

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Predators and Saprophytes, by Robert Gore

They’re not your protectors if they’re eating you.

Bruno walks into a neighborhood shop and threatens the shopkeeper with unspecified “bad things” if the shopkeeper doesn’t fork over $200 a week. The shopkeeper pays. If Bruno runs a “legitimate” protection racket, bad things don’t happen.

You can skip a class, indeed an entire four-year program in political theory, if you realize that governments are everywhere and always protection rackets. Fork over money and personal freedom and the state will protect you from bad things, specified or otherwise. Sometimes the state aligns itself with a deity or deities, demanding not just money and obedience but worship, too.

What if the shopkeeper pays Bruno, but his shop is still beset with burglaries? What if he discovers that Bruno is the burglar? The shopkeeper faces the same quandary as billions of people who are subjugated by governments: they need protection from their protection rackets. The protector has dropped all pretense of protection and has become a predator.

When the Soviet Union conducted its first successful atomic bomb test on August 29, 1949, it undercut the protection-racket rationale for governments. No one realized it at the time, but how can you run a protection racket if you can’t protect those you’re purportedly protecting from annihilation? Perhaps that wasn’t the case in 1949―the US still had a lead in nuclear armaments―but by 1955, when the Soviets detonated their first hydrogen bomb, it was clear that all either the Soviet or American government could offer its people was assured destruction of the other side, and most likely their own, in the event of an attack.

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Slouching Toward Okeefenoke, by James Howard Kunstler

The real Russian collusion conspiracy, the one involving Hillary Clinton’s campaign, the DNC, and Robert Mueller and team, is gradually being exposed. From James Howard Kunstler at kunstler.com:

Quite a hot time in the ole Swamp this week, with the gators, ‘possums, snakes, and snappers roiling the filthy waters to a bloody froth in the battle for supremacy of the food chain. The Swamp even has its own version of Bigfoot, the Golden Golem of Greatness. Lumbering and garrulous, unlike his shy cousin of the Oregon forests, the flaxen-haired giant plies the sloughs, oak domes, and cypress hammocks desperately seeking respect. His bellowing can be heard each night through the din of chittering insects, croaking bullfrogs, laughing anhingas, and the baying bloodhounds at his heels, as he searches for the fabled drain-plug that might convert this treacherous ecology into an upland peaceable kingdom.

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A Blueprint for Resistance: Jesus Christ vs. the Police State, by John W. Whitehead

Jesus Christ was a pain in the ass to the reigning police state—the Roman Empire—of his time. That’s why they nailed him to the cross. From John W. Whitehead at rutherford.org:

“In that dramatic scene on Calvary’s hill three men were crucified. We must never forget that all three were crucified for the same crime — the crime of extremism. Two were extremists for immorality, and thus fell below their environment. The other, Jesus Christ, was an extremist for love, truth and goodness, and thereby rose above his environment. Perhaps …the nation and the world are in dire need of creative extremists.” —Martin Luther King Jr.

Just as police states have arisen throughout history, there have also been individuals or groups of individuals who have risen up to challenge the injustices of their age.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer risked his life to undermine the tyranny at the heart of Nazi Germany.

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn challenged the soul-destroying gulags of the Soviet Union.

Martin Luther King Jr. called America on the carpet for its color-coded system of racial segregation and warmongering.

And then there was Jesus Christ, an itinerant preacher and revolutionary activist, who not only died challenging the police state of his day—namely, the Roman Empire—but provided a blueprint for standing up to tyranny that would be followed by those, religious and otherwise, who came after him.

A radical nonconformist who challenged authority at every turn, Jesus was a far cry from the watered-down, corporatized, simplified, gentrified, sissified vision of a meek creature holding a lamb that most modern churches peddle. In fact, he spent his adult life speaking truth to power, challenging the status quo of his day, and pushing back against the abuses of the Roman Empire.

Those living through this present age of militarized police, SWAT team raids, police shootings of unarmed citizens, roadside strip searches, and invasive surveillance might feel as if these events are unprecedented, the characteristics of a police state and its reasons for being are no different today than they were in Jesus’ lifetime: control, power and money.

Much like the American Empire today, the Roman Empire of Jesus’ day was characterized by secrecy, surveillance, a widespread police presence, a citizenry treated like suspects with little recourse against the police state, perpetual wars, a military empire, martial law, and political retribution against those who dared to challenge the power of the state.

As I point out in my book Battlefield America: The War on the American People, a police state extends far beyond the actions of law enforcement.  In fact, a police state “is characterized by bureaucracy, secrecy, perpetual wars, a nation of suspects, militarization, surveillance, widespread police presence, and a citizenry with little recourse against police actions.”

Indeed, the police state in which Jesus lived and its striking similarities to modern-day America are beyond troubling.

To continue reading: A Blueprint for Resistance: Jesus Christ vs. the Police State