Tag Archives: Health

Modern Medicine’s Aversion To Vitamin C Therapy Results In A Half-Million Needless Deaths From Sepsis In U.S. Hospitals Every Year, by Bill Sardi

We know why modern medicine is averse to vitamin therapies: there’s no money in it. From Bill Sardi at lewrockwell.com:

While modern medicine casts a blind eye towards vitamin therapy and even exhibits open disdain for health practitioners and patients who incorporate vitamins into daily health regimens, it now appears a half-million Americans are losing their lives to a mortal bloodstream infection called sepsis that is induced by a deficiency of vitamin C.

After three decades, and more than one-hundred failed clinical trials of synthetic drugs to quell the most common cause of death in American hospitals, modern medicine is dragging its feet over what has now been demonstrated to be obvious — intravenous vitamin C demonstrably reduces death from sepsis.  Sepsis patients are being brought back from the precipice of death, enough to make ICU nurses cry tears of joy.  But medical overseers have attempted to obscure this fact.

Here is what modern medicine did to quash the compelling though preliminary data showing vitamin C saves lives of sepsis patients.

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Food Is Freedom: How Washington’s Food Subsidies Have Helped Make Americans Fat and Sick, by Sam Jacobs

Surely the prevalence of high fructose corn syrup in so many products might have something to do with the fact that corn is heavily subsidized by the US government. From Sam Jacobs at theburningplatform.com:

Farm subsidies are perhaps the ultimate, but secret, third rail of American politics. While entitlements are discussed out in the open, farm subsidies are rarely talked about – even though they are the most expensive subsidy Washington doles out.

All told, the U.S. government spends $20 billion annually on farm subsidies, with approximately 39 percent of all farms receiving some sort of subsidy. For comparison, the oil industry gets about $4.6 billion annually and annual housing subsidies total another $15 billion. A significant portion of this $20 billion goes not to your local family farm, but to Big Aggie.

(Note that this $20 billion annual farm subsidy figure doesn’t take into account the 30+ years of ethanol subsidies to the corn industry nor export subsidies to U.S. farmers issued by the USDA.)

The government never properly explains why this is. Certainly small farmers are growing their crops at enormous risk. However, it’s not clear that agriculture is any different than other high-risk industries – especially because the United States is blessed with some of the most fertile farmland in the world, and a highly skilled labor force.

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The 2 Most Important Things I Learned When the SHTF in Venezuela, by J.G. Martinez D.

Some things just cannot be taken for granted. From J.G. Martinez D. at theorganicprepper.com:

Hello again fellows.

It’s has been a while since our last interaction.

Some health issues have knocked me down on my back, literally, this last week, but here I am again. Stress seems to be charging a toll on me.

Let’s go straight to the topic now. I know this is not something I usually do, you’re right.

If there is something that looks like SHTF, it is the extreme change of the situation we faced. I will elaborate a small prelude for those readers unaware of our story. I had a good life back there in Venezuela, until 3 or 4 years ago. Living in an already paid for house, in a good subdivision, a city the exact size not too big not too small..good medical care, good salary, a great job. In less than one year (a few months, indeed) all of that is gone. Couple relationship, everything. A total extension, all of a sudden, life reset. And a bugout getting through two foreign countries, now becoming increasingly violent against us migrants.

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How Environmental Conditioning Helps You Tap Into Your Evolutionary Strengths, by Joseph Mercola

The title may look like spam internet advertising, but this a serious, and fascinating article. From Joseph Mercola at lewrockwell.com:

Effortless comfort has made us fat and sick. In this interview, Scott Carney, an investigative journalist, anthropologist and author of “What Doesn’t Kill Us: How Freezing Water, Extreme Altitude and Environmental Conditioning Will Renew Our Lost Evolutionary Strength,

The book reveals how environmental conditioning can improve your health by boosting your metabolic efficiency. A large portion of the book focuses on Danish fitness guru Wim Hof’s philosophies.1

Hof does not lead a healthy lifestyle and does not optimize his diet or other healthy lifestyle strategies, which makes these accomplishments even more impressive. Please understand this interview is not an endorsement of Hof’s lifestyle.

Hof, perhaps better known as “The Iceman,” has gained a fair amount of notoriety for his ability to withstand extreme cold — an ability he attributes to a specific set of techniques involving breath work and extreme temperature conditioning.

Conquering Mount Kilimanjaro

Carney was initially hired by Playboy Magazine to investigate Hof, but wound up embracing this program, and actually climbed Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest mountain in Africa, wearing nothing but shoes and shorts, going shirtless most of the way.

He also completed the climb in 28 hours, which is very fast. It usually takes five to 10 days to get to the top, as you need to acclimatize to the altitude. Altitude sickness occurs when your blood oxygen level gets so low that you start having headaches.

As it progresses it can turn into hypobaric hypoxia, which leads to swollen limbs, cardiac arrest and pulmonary embolism. Ninety percent of people who attempt the summit get some version of altitude sickness.

Carney’s training allowed him to make the climb without acclimatization, which is nearly unheard of.

“The U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, which is the environmental unit for the U.S. army, has really advanced tables for high altitude ascents. They predicted about 70 percent [of the group] would come down with acute mountain sickness …

Instead, 93 percent of us made it up to the top. The first group, where I was, did it in 28 hours, which was incredibly fast. When we asked the Dutch Mountaineering Association what our success rate would be, they predicted a 100 percent fatality rate,” Carney says.

To continue reading: How Environmental Conditioning Helps You Tap Into Your Evolutionary Strengths

He Said That? 1/2/17

The following quote is attributed to Theodore Roosevelt:

The reason fat men are good natured is they can neither fight nor run.

Today the gym was packed with the New Year’s resolution crowd. It will remain so, to be charitable, for the next couple of weeks.

America You Need To Lose Weight: At Least 1 Out Of Every 5 People Are Obese In All 50 States, by Michael Snyder

America is way too fat for its own good. From Michael Snyder at theeconomiccollapseblog.com

The United States officially has an obesity crisis. According to a brand new report that was just released by the Trust for America’s Health, at least one out of every five people meet the clinical definition for obesity in all 50 states. But of course in some states things are far worse than that. More than 35 percent of all adults are obese in four states, and the obesity rate is between 30 and 35 percent in 21 other states. And it is important to keep in mind that just needing to lose weight does not mean that you are obese. According to the CDC, you have got to have a body mass index of at least 30.0 to meet the clinical definition for obesity.

Each year, the American people spend 60 billion dollars on weight loss programs and products. That breaks down to about 188 dollars for every man, woman and child in the country. We are a nation that is absolutely obsessed with losing weight, and yet obesity levels are hovering near all-time record highs.

But some parts of the U.S. are definitely doing better than others. The following is an excerpt that comes directly from the new report…

In 2015, Louisiana has the highest adult obesity rate at 36.2 percent and Colorado has the lowest at 20.2 percent. While rates remained steady for most states, they are still high across the board. The 13th annual report found that rates of obesity now exceed 35 percent in four states, are at or above 30 percent in 25 states and are above 20 percent in all states. In 1991, no state had a rate above 20 percent.

Did you catch that last part?

I put it in bold for a reason. To me, it is absolutely incredible that no state in the entire country had an obesity rate of more than 20 percent just 25 years ago.

How is that possible?

How could obesity explode to such a dramatic level in just a couple of decades?

Well, a lot of it has to do with what we eat and drink, and I will have some comments about that below. But first, let’s take a look at some more statistics from this new report. It turns out that there seems to be a significant link between obesity and poverty…

• 9 of the 11 states with the highest obesity rates are in the South and 22 of the 25 states with the highest rates of obesity are in the South and Midwest.
• 10 of the 12 states with the highest rates of diabetes are in the South.
American Indian/Alaska Natives have an adult obesity rate of 42.3 percent.
• Adult obesity rates are at or above 40 percent for Blacks in 14 states.
•Adult obesity rates are at or above 30 percent in: 40 states and Washington, D.C. for Blacks; 29 states for Latinos; and 16 states for Whites.

The report also noted that it has been estimated that our obesity epidemic costs the United States somewhere between 147 billion dollars and 210 billion dollars every single year.

That is an enormous amount of money, and if we were all a bit healthier it would benefit our society tremendously.

To continue reading: America You Need To Lose Weight: At Least 1 Out Of Every 5 People Are Obese In All 50 States