Tag Archives: Red Flag laws

San Francisco spends almost $30 per flush for public toilets, by Simon Black

It’s time for Simon Black’s weekly tabulation of the absurd. From Black at sovereignman.com:

Are you ready for this week’s absurdity? Here’s our Friday roll-up of the most ridiculous stories from around the world that are threats to your liberty, your finances, and your prosperity.

British school controls where children eat and shop after school

Imagine a man in a high visibility jacket comes into your take-out restaurant, and starts berating your customers, telling them to leave, and threatening them if they don’t.

That is what business owners in Bristol, England are dealing with. The man in the official looking high-viz reflective vest was a teacher, and the customers were students.

It is school policy to restrict what shops and restaurants students can patronize on their way home from school, by sending teachers out to patrol the streets.

Students who disobey the rule are punished with detention, even though this happens outside of school hours and off school property.

The business owner had to call the police to get the teacher to leave, and stop blocking the doorway to his shop (which prevented customers from entering).

He says it has cut down on his business significantly, including intimidating other customers besides the school children.

When the man spoke to the school Superintendent, he was treated to a lecture about how his food is unhealthy, and should not be available to students.

Click here to read the full story.

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Sin Taxes & Other Orwellian Methods of Compliance That Feed the Government’s Greed, by John Whitehead

We live in a kleptocratic, increasingly totalitarian state. From John Whitehead at rutherford.org:

“Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victim may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron’s cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated, but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience.”—C.S. Lewis

“Taxman,” the only song written by George Harrison to open one of the Beatles’ albums (it featured on the band’s 1966 Revolver album), is a snarling, biting, angry commentary on government greed and how little control “we the taxpayers” have over our lives and our money.

If you drive a car, I’ll tax the street,

If you try to sit, I’ll tax your seat.

If you get too cold I’ll tax the heat,

If you take a walk, I’ll tax your feet.

Don’t ask me what I want it for

If you don’t want to pay some more

‘Cause I’m the taxman, yeah, I’m the taxman.

When the Beatles finally started earning enough money from their music to place them in the top tax bracket, they found the British government only-too-eager to levy a supertax on them of more than 90%.

Here in America, things aren’t much better.

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Everyone Wants to Win and Nobody Likes Being Wrong, by Doug “Uncola” Lynn

Doug “Uncola” Lynn returns to a favorite question: is Trump one of them or one of us? From Lynn at theburningplatform.com:

The axiomatic adages contained in the title of this article would be labeled as common sense by most Americans; especially Americans because, in the United States, everyone loves a winner.  It’s also true no one ever wins by being wrong – unless in the instances of dumb luck or corruption and these never ensure long-lasting success.

Of course, the inverse of this article’s title would be: Everyone wants to be right and nobody likes to lose. And, particularly, in America, the land of the free and the home of the brave. The shining city on a hill.

Such are the stories we tell ourselves.

Twenty years ago, this blogger had a friend and former co-worker who entered into a downward spiral in the wake of his father’s death.  Being a former drinking buddy and someone I’d not seen in some time, we ran into each other again at a party and him with a real floozy on his arm. They were making out like teenagers and it was sort of embarrassing.

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