Category Archives: Entertainment

Hollywood Midterm Endorsements Reveal Dwindling Celebrity Influence, by Jon Hall

Have people stopped listening to celebrities? Judging by the midterms, it appears so. From Jon Hall at fmshooter.com:

Ahead of the 2018 Midterm elections, many Hollywood celebrities threw their hat in the ring to back a particular candidate in hopes of boosting their chances of winning their respective races.

For instance, Taylor Swift made headlines last month when she endorsed Democratic Senator Phil Bredesen in Tennessee’s elections

Bredesen, however – even with Swift’s endorsement – lost handily to Republican Marsha Blackburn on election night.

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Not Too Big to Fail: Facebook’s Long Reign May Be Coming to an End, by Brittany Hunter

It seems like a daunting challenge to knock Facebook off its pedestal, but seemingly unbeatable companies come and go all the time. By the way, I deactivated my Facebook account. From Brittany Hunter at theantimedia.org:

Sears and Blockbuster fell because neither was able to adapt and grow with its consumer base. Is Facebook making the same mistakes?

Over the last several years, Facebook has gone from facilitating the free flow of information to inhibiting it through incremental censorship and account purges. What began with the ban of Alex Jones last summer has since escalated to include the expulsion of hundreds of additional pages, each political in nature. And as more people become wary of the social media platform’s motives, one thing is absolutely certain: we need more market competition in the realm of social media.

Facebook might seem too big to fail, but rest assured it is not. Unless it is protected by a government monopoly, every single product and service is vulnerable to market forces, even those considered too powerful. Just a few weeks ago, the once-mighty Sears announced its plans to file for bankruptcy and close 142 of its department store locations. It also wasn’t so long ago when Blockbuster Video, a staple of weekend fun in the 90s, announced its closure, as well. These institutions were at the top of their games at one point but were each unable to satisfy their customers as they once did. And both were inevitably replaced by better services like Amazon Prime and Netflix.

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Midterms 2018: Battle Of The NPCs, by Caitlin Johnstone

The NPC meme offends exactly who is it supposed to offend: NPCs. From Caitlin Johnstone at medium.com:

The NPC meme has gone mainstream. Reports by major mass media outlets like the New York Times and the BBC have turned it into a viral sensation, and now everyone and their grandma knows about the meme used to spoof mindless followers of liberal media herd mentality programming. Any venture into the fray of the political Twittersphere now comes with a twist of alternate accounts with gray-faced profile pictures bleating things like “Orange man bad” and “#IMPEACH” in cartoonish mockery of the repetitive lines used by the rank-and-file opposition to Donald Trump.

And it’s great. The foam-brained mainliners of MSNBC and Washington Postpropaganda deserve to have their unquestioning faith in establishment narratives mocked at every turn, and the propagandists who promulgate those lies day after day deserve to be lampooned. One of the most fundamentally profane things a human being can do is turn over their mental sovereignty to the institutions and agendas of the powerful, and by allowing themselves to be indoctrinated into establishment narratives that is exactly what is happening. They abdicate their rightful position as a creative participant in this world and allow their mental processes to be transformed into a looping churn of ideas manufactured in some DC think tank for the benefit of a few billionaires and their lackeys.

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A Clockwork Orange: Waiting for the Sun, by Doug “Uncola” Lynch

This will appeal to a certain type of philosophically speculative mind. From Doug  “Uncola” Lynn at theburningplatform.com:

 Society should not do the wrong thing for the right reason, even though it frequently does the right thing for the wrong reason.

History has shown us what happens when you try to make society too civilized, or do too good a job of eliminating undesirable elements. It also shows the tragic fallacy in the belief that the destruction of democratic institutions will cause better ones to arise in their place.

Stanley Kubrick on “A Clockwork Orange”, an interview with film critic Michel Ciment

An obscure Texas political consultant named Bill Miller once said “politics is show business for ugly people”.  It’s true for the most part, aside from the consequences.  This is because the theatrics of politicians result in policies that affect the lives of others; often against the will of the governed. In books and movies, however, the characters are much ado about nothing. Until, that is, life imitates art.

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Michael Moore’s “Fahrenheit 11/9” Aims Not at Trump But at Those Who Created the Conditions That Led to His Rise, by Glenn Greenwald

This movie has got to be better than another comic book film. From Glenn Greenwald at the intercept.com:

2017 AP YEAR END PHOTOS - Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th president of the United States by Chief Justice John Roberts, as Melania Trump and his family looks on during the 58th Presidential Inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, on Jan. 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th president of the United States by Chief Justice John Roberts during the 58th Presidential Inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington D.C., on Jan. 20, 2017.

Photo: Patrick Semansky/AP

“FAHRENHEIT 11/9,” the title of Michael Moore’s new film that opens today in theaters, is an obvious play on the title of his wildly profitable Bush-era “Fahrenheit 9/11,” but also a reference to the date of Donald J. Trump’s 2016 election victory. Despite that, Trump himself is a secondary figure in Moore’s film, which is far more focused on the far more relevant and interesting questions of what – and, critically, who – created the climate in which someone like Trump could occupy the Oval Office.For that reason alone, Moore’s film is highly worthwhile regardless of where one falls on the political spectrum. The single most significant defect in U.S. political discourse is the monomaniacal focus on Trump himself, as though he is the cause – rather than the by-product and symptom – of decades-old systemic American pathologies.

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Hollywood Can’t (Won’t) Make Awesome Movies Anymore, by Kurt Schlichter

Hollywood can’t even make moderately likable movies anymore. From Kurt Schlichter at theburningplatform.com:

Hollywood Can’t (Won’t) Make Awesome Movies Anymore

When Burt Reynolds drove his celestial Trans-Am into the Great Beyond he took a significant chunk of America’s dwindling reserve of testosterone along with him. Unless you grew up in the ‘70s, its hard to understand his influence and impact, and how he reflected what Americans (particularly American men) wanted to be. Flicks like The Longest Yard, Smokey and the Bandit, and the criminally underrated Sharkey’s Machine, all offered us a tough but funny hero who took on the bullies in authority with a smirk, a joke, and when appropriate, a football to the “nether regions.”

Of course, you couldn’t make any of those movies in 2018. They are all too subversive, and Hollywood – a key component of the elite establishment – isn’t interested in subversion. It’s won. It’s taken power. Now it’s interested in submission.

Your submission.

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The Freedom to Destroy You, by Porter

Where current trends will take what’s left of our civil liberties—we won’t have any. From Porter at kakistocracyblog.wordpress.com:

I hope you won’t think me anything less than a grinning optimist if I were to opine that the path from corporate censorship to corporate oppression is practically frictionless. Social media, Internet infrastructure, and now even payment processors have raised their red flags in a coordinated assault. It’s been quite a demonstration of malice. And I suspect it’s one that’s barely even begun.

That’s because the corporate-left’s attacks have all been ad-hoc to this point. Think of it as artisanal totalitarianism. All communist heroes and no five-year plans. The entire process relies too much on individual bolshevik valor. Normally it requires a twitter bugler to scream anathema, which may or may not generate the necessary prog frenzy, which then induces the relatively slow corporate gears to grind the offender into unpersonhood. It’s effective, but inefficient. And inefficiency is something corporations can efficiently resolve. But they formal need policy and procedure. Continue reading